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I have a following class :

[DataContract]
public class Pair<TKey, TValue> : INotifyPropertyChanged, IDisposable
{
    public Pair(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        Key = key;
        Value = value;
    }

    #region Properties
    [DataMember]
    public TKey Key
    {
        get
        { return m_key; }
        set
        {
            m_key = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Key");
        }
    }
    [DataMember]
    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return m_value; }
        set
        {
            m_value = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Value");
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Fields
    private TKey m_key;
    private TValue m_value;
    #endregion

    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    { }

    #endregion
}

Which I've put in an ObservableCollection :

ObservableCollection<Pair<ushort, string>> my_collection = 
    new ObservableCollection<Pair<ushort, string>>();

my_collection.Add(new Pair(7, "aaa"));
my_collection.Add(new Pair(3, "xey"));
my_collection.Add(new Pair(6, "fty"));

Q : How do I sort it by key ?

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for a sorting implementation within the class or just any type of sorting will do? –  o.k.w Dec 22 '09 at 10:25
    
Not sure how to understand that. Basically I just want to have it sorted, the collection isn't going to be very big (20 items max) so anything will do (most likely) –  Maciek Dec 22 '09 at 10:29

15 Answers 15

up vote 5 down vote accepted

OP Edit: as many have correctly pointed out the original answer does not return the same collection, (originally focused more on sorting the dictionary part of the Q). Please see edit at bottom where I address the sorting of an observable collection. Original left here as still receiving up votes

You can use linq as the doSort method below illustrates. A quick code snippet: produces

3:xey 6:fty 7:aaa

Alternatively you could use an extension method on the collection itself

var sortedOC = _collection.OrderBy(i => i.Key);

private void doSort()
{
    ObservableCollection<Pair<ushort, string>> _collection = 
        new ObservableCollection<Pair<ushort, string>>();

    _collection.Add(new Pair<ushort,string>(7,"aaa"));
    _collection.Add(new Pair<ushort, string>(3, "xey"));
    _collection.Add(new Pair<ushort, string>(6, "fty"));

    var sortedOC = from item in _collection
                   orderby item.Key
                   select item;

    foreach (var i in sortedOC)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(i);
    }

}

public class Pair<TKey, TValue>
{
    private TKey _key;

    public TKey Key
    {
        get { return _key; }
        set { _key = value; }
    }
    private TValue _value;

    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set { _value = value; }
    }

    public Pair(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        _key = key;
        _value = value;

    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Key + ":" + this.Value;
    }
}

EDIT

To return an ObservableCollection, call .ToObservableCollection on sortedOC using e.g. this implementation.

OP EDIT Sorting an observable and returning the same object sorted can be done using an extension method. For larger collections watch out for the number of collection changed notifications eg

public static void Sort<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> observable) where T : IComparable<T>, IEquatable<T>
    {
        List<T> sorted = observable.OrderBy(x => x).ToList();

        int ptr = 0;
        while (ptr < sorted.Count)
        {
            if (!observable[ptr].Equals(sorted[ptr]))
            {
                T t = observable[ptr];
                observable.RemoveAt(ptr);
                observable.Insert(sorted.IndexOf(t), t);
            }
            else
            {
                ptr++;
            }
        }
    }

usage: Sample with an observer (used a Person class to keep it simple)

public class Person:IComparable<Person>,IEquatable<Person>
    { 
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }

        public int CompareTo(Person other)
        {
            if (this.Age == other.Age) return 0;
            return this.Age.CompareTo(other.Age);
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return Name + " aged " + Age;
        }

        public bool Equals(Person other)
        {
            if (this.Name.Equals(other.Name) && this.Age.Equals(other.Age)) return true;
            return false;
        }
    }

  static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("adding items...");
        var observable = new ObservableCollection<Person>()
        {
            new Person { Name = "Katy", Age = 51 },
            new Person { Name = "Jack", Age = 12 },
            new Person { Name = "Bob",  Age = 13 },
            new Person { Name = "John", Age = 14 },
            new Person { Name = "Mary", Age = 41 },
            new Person { Name = "Jane", Age = 20 },
            new Person { Name = "Jim",  Age = 39 },
            new Person { Name = "Sue",  Age = 15 },
            new Person { Name = "Kim",  Age = 19 }
        };

        //what do observers see?
        observable.CollectionChanged += (o, e) => {

            if (e.OldItems != null)
            {
                foreach (var item in e.OldItems)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("removed {0} at index {1}", item, e.OldStartingIndex);
                }
            }

            if (e.NewItems != null)
            {
                foreach (var item in e.NewItems)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("added {0} at index {1}", item, e.NewStartingIndex);
                }
            }};            

        Console.WriteLine("\nsorting items...");
        observable.Sort();
    };

Output from above:
removed Katy aged 51 at index 0
added Katy aged 51 at index 8
removed Mary aged 41 at index 3
added Mary aged 41 at index 7
removed Jane aged 20 at index 3
added Jane aged 20 at index 5
removed Jim aged 39 at index 3
added Jim aged 39 at index 6
removed Jane aged 20 at index 4
added Jane aged 20 at index 5

The Person class implements both IComparable and IEquatable the latter is used to minimise the changes to the collection so as to reduce the number of change notifications raised

share|improve this answer
    
Found this and founc it most helpfull. Is it LINQ that makes up the sortedOC var? –  Jason94 Apr 26 '12 at 8:52
8  
Not a fan of this answer because it doesn't give you a sorted ObservableCollection. –  xr280xr Jun 11 '12 at 16:53
39  
-1 since it doesn't sort the ObservableCollection, but instead creates a new collection. –  Kos Aug 30 '12 at 11:12
    
The updated code will work, but has O(n^2) time complexity. This can be improved to O(n*log(n)) by using BinarySearch instead of IndexOf. –  William Morrison Nov 21 at 15:15

I know this question is old, but just happened across it while googling and found a relevant blog entry that provides a better answer than the ones here:

http://kiwigis.blogspot.com/2010/03/how-to-sort-obversablecollection.html

UPDATE

The ObservableSortedList that @romkyns points out in the comments automatically maintains sort order.

Implements an observable collection which maintains its items in sorted order. In particular, changes to item properties that result in order changes are handled correctly.

However note also the remark

May be buggy due to the comparative complexity of the interface involved and its relatively poor documentation (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/5883947/33080).

share|improve this answer
2  
Indeed, this blog is more useful. However, I am yet to find a decent answer to the question of having an observable collection that maintains its sorting as items are added and removed. I am going to write my own I think. –  Stephen Drew May 10 '11 at 14:42
    
Wonderful, thanks! –  SoMoS Feb 27 '12 at 23:14
    
@Steve You can try this one‌​. –  romkyns Apr 13 '12 at 14:23
    
Thanks for the link, I went with the extension method as this seemed the tidiest solution. Works a charm :D –  pengibot Sep 20 '12 at 14:58
1  
@romkyns the answer was to extend ObservableCollection<T>. The GridView recognizes it just fine then. Then just hide it's methods, much like you do. I'll post a full solution when I have time. –  Weston Oct 11 '13 at 1:18

This simple extension worked beautifully for me. I just had to make sure that MyObject was IComparable. When the sort method is called on the observable collection of MyObjects, the CompareTo method on MyObject is called, which calls my Logical Sort method. While it doesn't have all the bells and whistles of the rest of the answers posted here, it's exactly what I needed.

static class Extensions
{
    public static void Sort<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> collection) where T : IComparable
    {
        List<T> sorted = collection.OrderBy(x => x).ToList();
        for (int i = 0; i < sorted.Count(); i++)
            collection.Move(collection.IndexOf(sorted[i]), i);
    }
}

public class MyObject: IComparable
{
    public int CompareTo(object o)
    {
        MyObject a = this;
        MyObject b = (MyObject)o;
        return Utils.LogicalStringCompare(a.Title, b.Title);
    }

    public string Title;

}
  .
  .
  .
myCollection = new ObservableCollection<MyObject>();
//add stuff to collection
myCollection.Sort();
share|improve this answer
2  
this should be the answer –  thumbmunkeys Jun 29 '13 at 13:20
    
This appears to be the only answer that actually sorts the original list, and does so without remove/add items. –  Tristan Apr 2 at 23:00
    
Updated my answer above as it was the accepted one and addresses performance improvement over this answer which raises change notifications for everything in the collection –  Andrew Jun 16 at 12:03

You can use this simple method:

public static void Sort<TSource, TKey>(this Collection<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
{
    List<TSource> sortedList = source.OrderBy(keySelector).ToList();
    source.Clear();
    foreach (var sortedItem in sortedList)
        source.Add(sortedItem);
}

You can sort like this:

_collection.Sort(i => i.Key);

More detail: http://jaider.net/2011-05-04/sort-a-observablecollection/

share|improve this answer
4  
This clears the ObservableCollection then re-adds all the objects - so it's worth noting that if your UI is bound to the collection, you would not see animated changes, e.g. when items move –  Carlos P Aug 9 '12 at 13:15
1  
I don't sure why you have to display items moving around... e.g. you normally have ObservableCollection bound to ItemSource of the dropdowns and you don't see the collection at all. Also this operation of clear-out and fill-up is ultra fast... the "slow" one can be the sort that is already optimized. finally, you can modify this code to implement your move method, having the sortedlist and source the rest is easy. –  Jaider Oct 12 '12 at 3:24
    
If you are bound to a drop-down then you wouldn't benefit from seeing items moving around, that's true. If you're bound to a ListBox though, then frameworks such as WPF or Silverlight or Windows Store Apps will provide useful visual feedback as objects in the collection are re-indexed. –  Carlos P Oct 13 '12 at 11:09

I liked the bubble sort extension method approach on "Richie"'s blog above, but I don't necessarily want to just sort comparing the entire object. I more often want to sort on a specific property of the object. So I modified it to accept a key selector the way OrderBy does so you can choose which property to sort on:

    public static void Sort<TSource, TKey>(this ObservableCollection<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
    {
        if (source == null) return;

        Comparer<TKey> comparer = Comparer<TKey>.Default;

        for (int i = source.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
            {
                TSource o1 = source[j - 1];
                TSource o2 = source[j];
                if (comparer.Compare(keySelector(o1), keySelector(o2)) > 0)
                {
                    source.Remove(o1);
                    source.Insert(j, o1);
                }
            }
        }
    }

Which you would call the same way you would call OrderBy except it will sort the existing instance of your ObservableCollection instead of returning a new collection:

ObservableCollection<Person> people = new ObservableCollection<Person>();
...

people.Sort(p => p.FirstName);
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for posting this - as pointed out in the comments on Richie's blog, there are some worthwhile enhancements to this code; in particular using the 'Move' method of the source. I guess this would replace the Remove/Insert lines with source.Move(j-1, j); –  Carlos P Aug 9 '12 at 13:16
1  
This sort algorithm is not optimized en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_algorithm –  Jaider Oct 11 '12 at 21:11
    
works safe and sound! –  AVEbrahimi Mar 3 '13 at 7:49

A variation is where you sort the collection in place using a selection sort algorithm. Elements are moved into place using the Move method. Each move will fire the CollectionChanged event with NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move (and also PropertyChanged with property name Item[]).

This algorithm has some nice properties:

  • The algorithm can be implemented as a stable sort.
  • The number of items moved in the collection (e.g. CollectionChanged events fired) is almost always less than other similar algorithms like insertion sort and bubble sort.

The algorithm is quite simple. The collection is iterated to find the smallest element which is then moved to the start of the collection. The process is repeated starting at the second element and so on until all elements have been moved into place. The algorithm is not terribly efficient but for anything you are going to display in a user interface it shouldn't matter. However, in terms of the number of move operations it is quite efficient.

Here is an extension method that for simplicity requires that the elements implement IComparable<T>. Other options are using an IComparer<T> or a Func<T, T, Boolean>.

public static class ObservableCollectionExtensions {

  public static void Sort<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> collection) where T : IComparable<T> {
    if (collection == null)
      throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");

    for (var startIndex = 0; startIndex < collection.Count - 1; startIndex += 1) {
      var indexOfSmallestItem = startIndex;
      for (var i = startIndex + 1; i < collection.Count; i += 1)
        if (collection[i].CompareTo(collection[indexOfSmallestItem]) < 0)
          indexOfSmallestItem = i;
      if (indexOfSmallestItem != startIndex)
        collection.Move(indexOfSmallestItem, startIndex);
    }
  }

}

Sorting a collection is simply a matter of invoking the extension method:

var collection = new ObservableCollection<String>(...);
collection.Sort();
share|improve this answer
1  
This is my preferred sorting way from all described here, unfortunately the Move method is not available in Silverlight 5. –  Eduardo Brites Apr 18 at 14:23

To improve a little bit the extension method on xr280xr answer I added an optional bool parameter to determine whether the sorting is descending or not. I also included the suggestion made by Carlos P in the comment to that answer. Please see below.

public static void Sort<TSource, TKey>(this ObservableCollection<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector, bool desc = false)
    {
        if (source == null) return;

        Comparer<TKey> comparer = Comparer<TKey>.Default;

        for (int i = source.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
            {
                TSource o1 = source[j - 1];
                TSource o2 = source[j];
                int comparison = comparer.Compare(keySelector(o1), keySelector(o2));
                if (desc && comparison < 0)
                    source.Move(j, j - 1);
                else if (!desc && comparison > 0)
                    source.Move(j - 1, j);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Do you need to keep your collection sorted at all times? When retrieving the pairs, do you need them to be always sorted, or it's only for a few times (maybe just for presenting)? How big do you expect your collection to be? There are a lot of factors that can help you decide witch method to use.

If you need the collection to be sorted at all times, even when you insert or delete elements and insertion speed is not a problem maybe you should implement some kind of SortedObservableCollection like @Gerrie Schenck mentioned or check out this implementation.

If you need your collection sorted just for a few times use:

my_collection.OrderBy(p => p.Key);

This will take some time to sort the collection, but even so, it might be the best solution depending on what your doing with it.

share|improve this answer
    
The link in this answer is to LGPL licensed code, so if you're Silverlight (can't dynamically link) or not open source be careful with that code. –  yzorg Jun 2 '11 at 13:22

Make a new class SortedObservableCollection, derive it from ObservableCollection and implement IComparable<Pair<ushort, string>>.

share|improve this answer
    
How does IComparable work? –  Maciek Dec 22 '09 at 10:27
    
Check out MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4d7sx9hd.aspx –  Gerrie Schenck Dec 22 '09 at 10:56
2  
This one is much easier said than done... –  romkyns Apr 13 '12 at 14:24

One way would be to convert it to a List and then call Sort(), providing a comparison delegate. Something like:-

(untested)

my_collection.ToList().Sort((left, right) => left == right ? 0 : (left > right ? -1 : 1));
share|improve this answer

What the heck, I'll throw in a quickly-cobbled-together answer as well...it looks a bit like some other implementations here, but I'll add it anywho:

(barely tested, hopefully I'm not embarassing myself)

Let's state some goals first (my assumptions):

1) Must sort ObservableCollection<T> in place, to maintain notifications, etc.

2) Must not be horribly inefficient (i.e., something close to standard "good" sorting efficiency)

public static class Ext
{
    public static void Sort<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> src)
        where T : IComparable<T>
    {
        // Some preliminary safety checks
        if(src == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("src");
        if(!src.Any()) return;

        // N for the select,
        // + ~ N log N, assuming "smart" sort implementation on the OrderBy
        // Total: N log N + N (est)
        var indexedPairs = src
            .Select((item,i) => Tuple.Create(i, item))
            .OrderBy(tup => tup.Item2);
        // N for another select
        var postIndexedPairs = indexedPairs
            .Select((item,i) => Tuple.Create(i, item.Item1, item.Item2));
        // N for a loop over every element
        var pairEnum = postIndexedPairs.GetEnumerator();
        pairEnum.MoveNext();
        for(int idx = 0; idx < src.Count; idx++, pairEnum.MoveNext())
        {
            src.RemoveAt(pairEnum.Current.Item1);
            src.Insert(idx, pairEnum.Current.Item3);            
        }
        // (very roughly) Estimated Complexity: 
        // N log N + N + N + N
        // == N log N + 3N
    }
}
share|improve this answer

None of these answers worked in my case. Either because it screws up binding, or requires so much additional coding that it's kind of a nightmare, or the answer is just broken. So, here's yet another simpler answer i thought. It's a lot less code and it remains the same observable collection with an additional this.sort type of method. Let me know if there's some reason I shouldn't be doing it this way (efficiency etc.)?

public class ScoutItems : ObservableCollection<ScoutItem>
{
    public void Sort(SortDirection _sDir, string _sItem)
    {
             //TODO: Add logic to look at _sItem and decide what property to sort on
            IEnumerable<ScoutItem> si_enum = this.AsEnumerable();

            if (_sDir == SortDirection.Ascending)
            {
                si_enum = si_enum.OrderBy(p => p.UPC).AsEnumerable();
            } else
            {
                si_enum = si_enum.OrderByDescending(p => p.UPC).AsEnumerable();
            }

            foreach (ScoutItem si in si_enum)
            {
                int _OldIndex = this.IndexOf(si);
                int _NewIndex = si_enum.ToList().IndexOf(si);
                this.MoveItem(_OldIndex, _NewIndex);
            }
      }
}

...Where ScoutItem is my public class. Just seemed a lot simpler. Added benefit: it actually works and doesn't mess with bindings or return a new collection etc.

share|improve this answer

Alright, since I was having issues getting ObservableSortedList to work with XAML, I went ahead and created SortingObservableCollection. It inherits from ObservableCollection, so it works with XAML and I've unit tested it to 98% code coverage. I've used it in my own apps, but I won't promise that it is bug free. Feel free to contribute. Here is sample code usage:

var collection = new SortingObservableCollection<MyViewModel, int>(Comparer<int>.Default, model => model.IntPropertyToSortOn);

collection.Add(new MyViewModel(3));
collection.Add(new MyViewModel(1));
collection.Add(new MyViewModel(2));
// At this point, the order is 1, 2, 3
collection[0].IntPropertyToSortOn = 4; // As long as IntPropertyToSortOn uses INotifyPropertyChanged, this will cause the collection to resort correctly

It's a PCL, so it should work with Windows Store, Windows Phone, and .NET 4.5.1.

share|improve this answer
    
You probably should not be using new on all those methods, if someone has a more generically typed instance those methods will not be called. Instead override every overridable method and change them as necessary or fallback on base.Method(...). You, for example, don't even need to worry about .Add because that internally uses .InsertItem, so if .InsertItem is overridden and adjusted, .Add will not mess with ordering. –  H.B. Jun 17 at 17:17
var collection = new ObservableCollection<int>();

collection.Add(7);
collection.Add(4);
collection.Add(12);
collection.Add(1);
collection.Add(20);

// ascending
collection = new ObservableCollection<int>(collection.OrderBy(a => a));

// descending
collection = new ObservableCollection<int>(collection.OrderByDescending(a => a));
share|improve this answer

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