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Is there a standard way to use a Python Queue in a with statement? This is how I would like to be able to use it:

import Queue
myqueue = Queue.Queue()
...
...
...
with myqueue as nextItem:
    doStuff(nextItem)

There are no __enter__ or __exit__ methods for Queue objects, so this does not work. Is there any syntactic sugar to make it look better than this?

import Queue
myqueue = Queue.Queue()
...
...
...
try:
    nextItem = myqueue.get()
    doStuff(nextItem)
finally:
    myqueue.task_done()

Edit: I have two reasons for wanting to use a with statement in this case. First, I think that a with statement would help my code be a little bit cleaner, especially when there is more than just the single call to doStuff. Second, it would be nice to have something simple that I could get in the habit of using every time that would ensure that I don't ever forget to call task_done or have a situation in which an error could cause the call to be skipped.

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5  
I think what you have is perfectly fine. Spend your time worrying about bigger issues. :) –  arshajii Oct 18 '13 at 16:47
1  
Subclass Queue with __enter__ and __exit__ methods? But really I don't think it matters that much. –  sweeneyrod Oct 18 '13 at 16:55
    
Unless you're playing code golf (why are you doing that, be productive, not pedantic) there's no reason to over-optimize like this. –  g.d.d.c Oct 18 '13 at 16:56
2  
I don't think this is especially good use of the with statement. with myqueue as next_item seems confusing, you myqueue isn't an item in a queue, so treating it as one strikes me as illogical. I suppose with myqueue.get() as nextitem makes sense. –  sweeneyrod Oct 18 '13 at 17:02
1  
remember that a 'context manager' is supposed to do something within a context. a Queue is not a context. i suppose a context could be something like 'in a task', but really if you want to abuse something for this, abuse a generator, not a context manager. –  Corley Brigman Oct 18 '13 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like the answer is no - there is no built-in way to do this.

However as sweeneyrod mentioned, it is possible to subclass Queue and add __enter__ and __exit__ methods. That would look like this:

import Queue

class MyQueue(Queue.Queue):
    def __enter__(self):
        return self.get()

    def __exit__(self, excType, excValue, traceback):
        self.task_done()

Which would allow for it to be used like I showed above, though this has the problem that it treats the queue as if it were a task. To fix that, we can use contextlib to create a method that acts as a context manager.

import Queue
from contextlib import contextmanager

class MyQueue(Queue.Queue):
    @contextmanager
    def task(self):
        try:
            yield self.get()
        finally:
            self.task_done()

You would use this version like this:

with myqueue.task() as next_task:
    doStuff(next_task)

It is also possible to have the task and __exit__ methods do some exception handling, though there are some differences between the two in how that is done.

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