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I have code like this:

public void testThreads() throws Exception {
   MyThreadManager mgr = createAndStartMyManager();
   Thread t1 = createMyThread(mgr, 1);
   Thread t2 = createMyThread(mgr, 2);

   t1.start();
   t2.start();

   //do some checks

   t1.join();
   t2.join();
}

The MyThreadManager operates with threads and may interrupt any of them in any time. Because this is part of test case and I need to debug running threads, I added joins to let the test wait for finish my debugging (JUnit disconnects debugger when tests finishes).

The problem is, that in some cases the join hangs - jstack output is like this:

    at java.lang.Object.wait(Native Method)
    - waiting on <0xeec68eb0> (a java.lang.Thread)
    at java.lang.Thread.join(Thread.java:1143)
    - locked <0xeec68eb0> (a java.lang.Thread)
    at java.lang.Thread.join(Thread.java:1196)
    at MyClass.testThreads(MyClass.java:100)

and according to join JDK (I use 1.6.0_07) implementation it seems that thread finishes just between calling isAlive and wait (marked in source code):

public final synchronized void join(long millis)
throws InterruptedException {
    long base = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long now = 0;

    if (millis < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("timeout value is negative");
    }

    if (millis == 0) {
        while (isAlive()) {
            // -----> here ???? <------
            wait(0);
        }
    } else {
        while (isAlive()) {
            long delay = millis - now;
            if (delay <= 0) {
                break;
            }
            wait(delay);
            now = System.currentTimeMillis() - base;
        }
    }
}

I tried the same with ThreadPoolExecutor and FutureTask, but the behavior was the same (it is hanging).

So my question is, if I am true with the race condition and also how to clearly join threads without any hanging ...

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

So my question is, if I am true with the race condition and also how to clearly join threads without any hanging ...

No there is not a race in that method. The race condition is solved because the method is synchronized. If it was a race condition then a large number of Java thread could would have been failing before now. I suspect that the thread you are joining on is still running. Is that not possible?

The problem is, that in some cases the join hangs - jstack output is like this:

This stack output shows that it is blocking in join(). As @Holger mentions, can you see the t1 or t2 stacks also there? It might be useful to name your threads so you can see them more easily in the stack trace output:

Thread t1 = createMyThread(mgr, 1, "t1"); // name passed to thread constructor
Thread t2 = createMyThread(mgr, 2, "t2"); // name passed to thread constructor

MyThreadManager operates with threads and may interrupt

Are you calling thread.interrupt()? If so this will not cause the thread to stop unless you are testing for the thread interrupt bit and/or are handling the InterruptedException correctly.

while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {

You also need to work if a 3rd party library is not reenabling the interrupt bit if it catches InterruptedException. The proper pattern is to do something like:

try {
    ...
} catch (InterruptedException ie) {
    // re-enable interrupt bit since catching InterruptedException clears it
    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    // handle the interrupt by maybe quitting the thread
    return;
}

I tried the same with ThreadPoolExecutor and FutureTask, but the behavior was the same (it is hanging).

With the TPE, you need to make sure that the executor is shutdown after all of the jobs have been submitted to it. That will cause your application to hang however and not show the same behavior as blocking in join().

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1  
Anyone who down votes an answer ought to leave a comment explaining why. An explanation helps both the person who's answer was down voted, and anyone else who happens upon the answer. –  axiopisty Oct 18 '13 at 17:32
1  
Well, I give you an upvote. I just want to add one remark to the questioner: when using jstack it’s worth looking what the threads t1 and t2 are doing. But everything else is already said in this answer. –  Holger Oct 18 '13 at 17:50
    
This is a very good write up. I think the op's thread is running/blocking on a non-interruptable/interrupt-unware code. Op should call getStackTrace() on the threads to see what they're doing (or use jvisual VM or similar). –  billc.cn Oct 18 '13 at 18:10

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