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I there a way to apply type annotation to an object literal directly? By directly I mean without having to assign it to a variable which is type annotated. For example: I know I can do it like this:

export interface IBaseInfo {}
export interface IMyInfo extends IBaseInfo { name: string; }
function testA(): IBaseInfo = {
   var result: IMyInfo = { name: 'Hey!' };
   return result;
}

I also can do it like this:

function testB(): IBaseInfo = {
   return { name: 'Hey!' };
}

But what I need is something like:

function testC(): IBaseInfo = {
   return { name: 'Hey!' }: IMyInfo; // <--- doesn't work
}

Or like this:

function testD(): IBaseInfo = {
   return IMyInfo: { name: 'Hey!' }; // <--- doesn't work
}
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Could you please explain why you "need something like" the third and fourth examples? –  David Norman Oct 19 '13 at 1:32
    
@DavidNorman, in order to enable the intellisense autocompletion –  1365 Oct 19 '13 at 1:45
    
Where do you want to use intellisense? In the third and fourth examples, there aren't any variables anywhere that you could use intellisense on. In the first example intellisense works on var. Could you expand one of the examples to explain what you want intellisense for? –  David Norman Oct 19 '13 at 3:03
    
@DavidNorman, in the 3rd and 4th examples all I want is to construct an instance of IMyInfo and return it immediately. I do need intellisense while working on the content of the object I am returning. So again the question was how can I put an object literal to a context that would impose the type on that object, so that the intellisense is able to help me constructing it. I don't want to involve variables just for the sake of inducing that context, because it would be an unnecessay memory allocation and assignment. Ryan already suggested a nice way of doing it. –  1365 Oct 19 '13 at 3:18
    
Note that in Ryan's example, the function returns an IMyInfo, not an IBaseInfo as in your examples. That's why intellisense on the returned value knows about the name property. If, as in your examples, the return value is IBaseInfo, then the intellisense won't know about the name property. –  David Norman Oct 19 '13 at 3:27
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3 Answers 3

Intellisense for members of object literals is provided by the contextual type (see section 4.19 of the spec) of the expression.

You can acquire a contextual type in a variety of ways. Some of the most common places where a contextual type is applied are:

  • The initializer of a variable with a type annotation
  • The expression in a return statement in a function or getter with a return type annotation
  • The expression in a type assertion expression (<T>expr)

In your example, you can use a type assertion to force your object literal to have a contextual type:

function testB() {
   return <IMyInfo>{ name: 'Hey!' };
}
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Your first and second examples fail, so yo can't do that. :)

Pretty sure you don't have to specify any types on your literal. As long as your literal meets the interface requirements, you're good.

interface IMyInfo { name: string; }
var asdf = {
   name: "test"
}

var qwer: IMyInfo = asdf;

If you want intellisense, you have to do something like:

enter image description here

Or maybe this is what you're looking for. Intellisense works here, at least on the playground.

enter image description here

Or maybe this. :)

enter image description here

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although I don't have to specify it explicitly as long as the type can be inferred I wish I could do that anyway for the sake of having Intellisense support at defining that object literal –  1365 Oct 18 '13 at 18:04
    
Udpated my answer. –  Alex Dresko Oct 18 '13 at 18:08
    
you don't get it, I don't want to assign my object to a variable ("something" in your example) in order to have intellisense assistance, what I am asking is if there is a way to annotate the object literal iteself and thus have the intellisense help skipping assigning it to a variable –  1365 Oct 18 '13 at 18:12
    
Updated again. :) –  Alex Dresko Oct 18 '13 at 18:18
    
same thing, can't you see it? you annotated the "asdf" variable, let me help you, try doing it without using the "var" keyword –  1365 Oct 18 '13 at 18:21
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Remember that that interfaces follow duck typing: if an object looks like it matches the interface, it does match the interface.

So

function testB(): IBaseInfo = {
   return { name: 'Hey!' };
}

is exactly the same as

function testA(): IBaseInfo = {
   var result: IMyInfo = { name: 'Hey!' };
   return result;
}

Either way, the returned object looks like an IMyInfo, so it is an IMyInfo. Nothing that happens inside the function affects what interfaces it matches.

However, in your examples, the return value of the function is IBaseInfo, so the compiler and intellisense will assume that the object is just an IBaseInfo. if you want the caller of the function to know that the return value is an IMyInfo, you need to make the return value of the function IMyInfo:

function testB(): IMyInfo = {
   return { name: 'Hey!' };
}

or using type inference, simply

function testB() = {
   return { name: 'Hey!' };
}
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Thank you, I know about duck typing and type inference. The question is about a diffrent thing though. –  1365 Oct 19 '13 at 1:02
    
Updated to talk about intellisense outside the function. –  David Norman Oct 19 '13 at 4:13
    
The example I wrote is simplified version of some code I am working on. I put it this way not to draw the attention away from the things in focus. I can't just return IMyInfo instead of IBaseInfo because the original function returns either an instance of IMyInfo or an instance of another type inherited from IBaseInfo. So the IBaseInfo is the common denominator. As Ryan pointed out you can tell the compiler to use IMyInfo as the type of the result value (even though the function is annotated with IBaseInfo) by using the type assertion operator. I checked it and it worked just as I wanted. –  1365 Oct 19 '13 at 4:43
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