Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use the method outlined this post in conjunction with url_for to determine if the current path is in a mounted engine, but I'm having a hard time figuring out how exactly to use Journey::Path::Pattern (which is what is returned by the mounted_path method outlined in the other post).

class Rails::Engine
  def self.mounted_path
    route = Rails.application.routes.routes.detect do |route|
      route.app == self
    end
    route && route.path
  end
end

There doesn't seem to be too much discussion on it anywhere, aside from the official documentation, which wasn't particularly helpful. I'm sure the solution is relatively simple, and the gist of the helper method I'm trying to write is below:

def in_engine? engine
  current_url.include?(engine.mounted_path)
end

Edit:

Some of my engines are mounted as subdomains and some are mounted within the app itself, preventing me from simply checking if the current subdomain is the same as the mounted path, or using path_for.

share|improve this question
    
I think you could do engine.mounted_path =~ url_for which is a regex match alias for the Journey::Path::Pattern –  CWitty Oct 22 '13 at 16:46
    
I would path_for instead of url_for as well. The Path would be something like '/backend' the url would be a full url. –  CWitty Oct 22 '13 at 16:52
    
My application is subdomain dependent, so I'm stuck with url_for. Additionally, just doing engine.mounted_path =~ url_for didn't work because of those subdomains. –  Jonathan Bender Oct 22 '13 at 21:24

1 Answer 1

Not exactly a solution, but maybe a useful lead.

I found your question interesting, so I started delving deep inside rails source... what a scary, yet instructive trip :D

Turns out that Rails' router has a recognize method that accepts a request as argument, and yields the routes that match the request.

As the routes have an app method you can compare to your engine, and as you can have access to the request object (which takes into account the http method, subdomain, etc), if you find out how to have direct access to the router instance, you should be able to do something along the lines of :

  def in_engine?(engine)
    router.recognize(request) do |route,*| 
      return true if route.app == engine
    end
    false
  end

EDIT

I think i found out, but it's late here in I have no rails app at hand to test this :(

  def in_engine?(engine)
    # get all engine routes. 
    # (maybe possible to do this directly with the engine, dunno)
    engine_routes = Rails.application.routes.set.select do |route| 
      route.app == engine
    end
    !!engine_routes.detect{ |route| route.matches?(request) }
  end

EDIT

also, maybe a simpler workaround would be to do this :

in your main app

  class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
    def in_engine?(engine)
      false
    end
    helper_method :in_engine?
  end

then in your engine's application controller

  def in_engine?(engine)
    engine == ::MyEngine
  end
  helper_method :in_engine?
share|improve this answer
    
also, ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet has a recognize_path that you may find interesting –  m_x Oct 31 '13 at 21:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.