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Suppose I have some bills with some start dates and end dates.

Mar 10 to Apr 9
Apr 10 to May 9
May 10 to Jun 9

The business rule that I want to check is that

for any given bill, the previous bill is exactly one period behind

So for example, Mar 10 to Apr 9 is about a month apart, and so I use that to check that any two consecutive bill start dates (Apr 10 vs Mar 10) are about a month apart.

Now the problem I'm having is obtaining the length of the period. For example, suppose I have the following data set

Jan 1 to Jan 31
Feb 1 to Feb 28
Mar 1 to Mar 31

I am using JodaTime library, so I say something like

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("dd/MM/yyyy");
DateTime date1 = formatter.parseDateTime("01/01/2013");
DateTime date2 = formatter.parseDateTime("31/01/2013");
System.out.println(Months.monthsBetween(date1, date2).toPeriod().getMonths());

And that returns 0, which is correct, but not useful.

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("dd/MM/yyyy");
DateTime date1 = formatter.parseDateTime("31/01/2013");
DateTime date2 = formatter.parseDateTime("01/02/2013");
System.out.println(Months.monthsBetween(date1, date2).toPeriod().getMonths());

And that returns 1, even though it's a day apart.

What is a better way to do this? I can check days difference but since the billing periods are specified in months I would like any output to be consistent (eg: these bills are not x months apart, etc)

share|improve this question
    
What about the condition that there is no day unbilled? What is toPeriod()? –  clwhisk Oct 18 '13 at 19:39
    
@clwhisk sorry can you provide an example of what you mean? –  MxyL Oct 18 '13 at 19:51
    
I think I understand what you mean. For example, if one period was Jan 1 to Jan 25, and the next period was Feb 1 to Feb 25, and they are still "valid" because the missing days in between were not to be counted. –  MxyL Oct 18 '13 at 20:14
    
That's not what I meant - basically thought the same as dkatzel. The questions were about what you meant. –  clwhisk Oct 18 '13 at 23:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

why not just check the the start date of one period minus one day is equal to the end date of the previous period?

LocalDate endDate1, startDate2...

startDate2.minusDays(1).equals(endDate1)
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that would solve problem, assuming all bill periods are consistent. –  MxyL Oct 18 '13 at 19:59

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