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I've tried running the following:

struct B;
struct C;
struct A{
    A() { f(this);}
    virtual A* f(A* a) {
        cout << " A::f(A)" <<endl;
        return a;
    }
    void h() { cout << typeid(*this).name() << endl;}
    void g(B* b);
};

struct B:A{ 
    B() { f(this); }
    virtual A* f(A* a) {
        cout << "B::f(A)" << endl;
        return a;
    }

    virtual B* f(B* b) {
        cout << "B::f(B)" << endl;
        return b;
    }

    virtual C* f(C* c) {
        cout << "B::f(C)" << endl;
        return c;
    }
};

struct C: B{};

void A::g(B* b) { cout << typeid(*this).name() << endl; f(b);};

int main(){
    B* b = new B();
    cout << "------" << endl;
    C* c = new C();
    cout << "------" << endl;
    c->g(b);
    return 0;
}

Notice that g() is non virtual so it's chosen during the compilation.

When running this I get the following output:

A::f(A)
B::f(B)
------
A::f(A)
B::f(B)
------
1C
B::f(A) <----- Notice this

Notice that the last line seems to have called f() as if it were dynamically bound but only to the method f() which A knows about (which I think has to do with the fact that g() is statically bound). What I expected to happen was to get B::f(B).

Why is f()'s call in g() computed at compile time?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Overloads have nothing to do with virtual polymorphism. Only A::f(A*) is virtual and dispatched dynamically. The function B::f(B*) is entirely unrelated.

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straight and to the point. For some reason I looked at it as if the arguments were covariant (which is obviously wrong). –  Shookie Oct 18 '13 at 18:48

A::g doesn't know that B introduces one more overload of f. In fact, it chooses to make a virtual call to f(A*), as it's the only f known at that place.

The virtual dispatch is done only by (invisible) -1st argument (this), not by any other arguments. So the function B::f(B*) is not taking part in the virtual chain. Therefore the actual f(A*) -- that is, B::f(A*) -- is chosen.

Calling a virtual function doesn't mean that the best matching signature is chosen an runtime, only the actual class is. The signature is chosen at compile-time (well, except return type).

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You have a dependency to a derived class in your base class. Since A::g is a member of A, it is compiled using A's vtable. It is not being "computed" at compile time. The dependency you created has it looking at the wrong portion of the vtable. To clarify, A only has f(A*) defined. It knows nothing about f(B*), so there is no way for it to call it.

If you have this kind of situation in real code, you really need to think about your design.

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C++11 added the override keyword to help you deal with your problem here.

When you think a virtual method overrides a base virtual method, append the keyword override to it.

In this case, when you change B to contain:

virtual B* f(B* b) override {
    cout << "B::f(B)" << endl;
    return b;
}

the compiler will complain and tell you that B* f(B*) does not override any method in from its parents. What you did here was introduce a new overload, a completely different function that happens to have the same name as the method A* f(A*).

Methods with the same name participate in overload resolution, but do not override each other virtually.

Because it has the same name, you thought it was an override -- but in reality, it is not. Once you realize that B* f(B*) is unrelated to A* f(A*), everything else that happens makes perfect sense.

Overload resolution in A examines the options it has for f(b), sees exactly one option, determines that it matches (as a A* argument is compatible with a B*), then calls it. At this point the virtual function table is examined, and the proper override is found (which is B::f(A*), the only override), which is then called.

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