Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using portable python 2.7.5.1.

The following line:

x = [{} for i in range(11464882)]

Causes a memory error (with no other messages):

>>> 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<module1>", line 12, in <module>
MemoryError
>>>

Note: there are only comments in lines 1-11.

Decreasing one unit in the funny number above the error disappears.

Considering that 11 million ain't that large, I believe there must be some simple setting that can increase the amount of memory available for my programs.

So, is this something simple I'm missing or an inherent memory limit?

share|improve this question
8  
Trying x = [{} for i in xrange(11464882)] and see if the number changes. –  dawg Oct 18 '13 at 18:27
    
What platform is this on? How much memory do you have? What does import sys; sys.getsizeof({}) say a dictionary requires in bytes? –  Martijn Pieters Oct 18 '13 at 18:27
1  
Also, range(11464882) creates a list of 11464882 integers. Use xrange() instead to avoid using up all that memory. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 18 '13 at 18:28
    
On my macbook air with python 2.7.x it requires ~3.5GB of memory. –  GWW Oct 18 '13 at 18:32
    
Thanks drewk and MartijnPieters, I'm new to python :-) –  Ferdinand.kraft Oct 18 '13 at 18:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

On my Mac OS X 10.8.5 64-bit laptop, a range(11464882) object requires:

>>> import sys
>>> sys.getsizeof(range(11464882))
91719128
>>> sys.getsizeof(11464881)  # largest number
24
>>> sys.getsizeof(0)         # smalest number
24
>>> 91719128 + (24 * 11464882)  # bytes
366876296
>>> (91719128 + (24 * 11464882)) / (1024.0 ** 2) # mb
349.88050079345703

so 350 megabytes of memory.

Here, sys.getsizeof() returns the memory footprint of the given Python objects not counting contained values. So, for a list, it is just the memory a list structure requires; bookkeeping information plus 11 million 64-bit pointers.

In addition, that many empty dictionaries take:

>>> sys.getsizeof({})
280
>>> 91719128 + 280 * 11464882
3301886088
>>> (91719128 + 280 * 11464882) / (1024.0 ** 2) # mb
3148.923957824707
>>> (91719128 + 280 * 11464882) / (1024.0 ** 3) # gb
3.0751210525631905

3 gigabytes of memory. 11 million times 280 bytes is a lot space.

Together with other overhead (most likely garbage collection cycle detection, the Python process itself and memoized values), that means you hit your machine's 4GB per-process memory limit.

If you are running a 32-bit binary, sizes will be smaller as you'd only need room for 32-bit pointers, but you also only get 2GB of addressable memory to fit all your objects into.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Martijn, you nailed it. In my platform, {} takes 140 bytes, so I'm hitting a 2GB barrier I guess. How can I tell if I'm running 32 or 64 bit python? I'm on win7-64. –  Ferdinand.kraft Oct 18 '13 at 18:49
    
@Ferdinand.kraft: look at sys.maxint; 2147483647 means you are running a 32-bit python. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 18 '13 at 18:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.