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Can anyone explain to me why "b" returns undefined and how I can get around this problem? Why does the "this" scope get lost when I call prototype functions by reference?

MyClass = function(test) {
this.test = test;
}

MyClass.prototype.myfunc = function() {       
   return this.test;
}

var a = new MyClass('asd').myfunc();
var b = new MyClass('asd').myfunc;

// Returns "asd" correctly
console.log(a)

// Returns undefined??
console.log(b())

=== EDIT / SOLUTION ===

As plalx writes, the correct solution in my case is to use .bind(). So the result looks like this:

MyClass = function(test) {
    this.test = test;
}

MyClass.prototype.myfunc = function() {       
   return this.test;
}

var a = new MyClass('asd').myfunc();
var b = new MyClass('asd'),
    bfunc = b.myfunc.bind(b)

// Returns "asd" correctly
console.log(a)

// Also returns "asd" correctly!
console.log(bfunc())
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2  
That's how this works. It's set when you call the function. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  SLaks Oct 18 '13 at 19:08
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to explicitely bind the this value if you want this behaviour.

var c = new MyClass('asd'),
    b = c.myfunc.bind(c);


console.log(b());

By default, this will point to the leftSide.ofTheDot(); in an invocation, or simply the object on which the function was called.

Note: Calling b(); is the same as window.b();.

Binding every function to the object instance is possible but rather inefficient because functions will not get shared across instances anymore.

E.g.

function MyClass(someVal) {
    var me = this;

    me.someVal = someVal;

    me.someFn = function () {
        return me.someVal;
    };
}
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Any way to bind it right at the myfunc definition so that it's always bound this way? –  Evgueni Naverniouk Oct 18 '13 at 19:12
    
@EvgueniNaverniouk Yes, I updated the answer, however I would not recommend it, unless you have very specific needs. Why do you need this? –  plalx Oct 18 '13 at 19:19
    
Right, so that's exactly what I want to avoid. I want to define the function as part of the prototype to ensure it's shared correctly, however, I also want to ensure I can call those functions by reference as described in my original answer. Sounds like it's not possible. –  Evgueni Naverniouk Oct 18 '13 at 20:29
    
@EvgueniNaverniouk, Well in that case I would simply use bind when you need to store a function reference. You could also store an object like var ref = {fn: theFunction, thisArg: theObject} and later use ref.fn.call(theObject). –  plalx Oct 18 '13 at 20:51
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The line var b... is a function reference and you're not actually calling the function.

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That's exactly what he's trying to do. –  SLaks Oct 18 '13 at 19:09
    
Yeah, that confused me at first - but when you look down at his console log statement, he's calling b() there, after having retrieved the function from the object. –  Katana314 Oct 18 '13 at 19:15
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Here you are assigning to a variable a result of myfunc() function.

var a = new MyClass('asd').myfunc();

And here, you are asigning to b variable function reference, rather then runing it, and assign result to variable.

var b = new MyClass('asd').myfunc;

And finaly here:

console.log(b())

You trying to log result of function b and in that case b() isn't defined anywhere, only it is assigned reference to function.

Try this:

console.log(b); // It logs [Function]

But besides that, your question is hard to understand.

P.S. Use semicolons!

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