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I have a system where all pages (views) and all controls (buttons, links, menu itens ...) have security roles applied to them.

So I have an admin interface where all pages and controls are registered. And each user has a set of individual permissions.

So, for example:

I have a View EditCar, with 3 buttons: "New", "Delete" and "Back".

So the user X have permission to see View EditCar, and only the button "Back"

So each new view must be registered, and the users associated with. There is no roles, because each user is 100% configurable.

So, I have a FilterAttribute:

public class CustomAuthorize : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAuthenticated)
        {

            var userPermissions = repository.GetAll().Where(x => x.Name.Equals(User.Identity.Name);                

            //   if (!userPermissions.Pages.Any(x => x.NamePage.Contains(???))))               
        }
        else
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();          
        }
    }
}

So my question is : - What should I keep in database to identify each View(Action) ? Maybe 3 values? Area-Controller-Action?

Is it the best option? Any other idea about that solution?

Thanks

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Do you want to control each user accessibility manually on super panel? –  AmirHossein Mehrvarzi Oct 21 '13 at 19:21
    
Yes... The user accessibility is manually controlled and created –  Paul Oct 22 '13 at 9:36
1  
So why you are using FilterAttributes? They'll be used for Monitoring Actions? While you need to customizing page elements accessibility! And in this manner you have forced to allow specific access to each Action?! Your question refers to element accessibility inside of each action, not to a complete action! –  AmirHossein Mehrvarzi Oct 22 '13 at 13:17
    
@Paul Why do you need such fine tuned security? Seems like a lot of work to setup a single user. More on topic, have you thought about created an Flag Enums to determine permission type (read, write, edit) and assign a GUID to the action/control? This way you can store the user, control/action GUID, and the bit mask of the actions allowed. –  Justin Oct 23 '13 at 17:05
    
@Justin Its a client requirement... I think using Area/Controller/Action names its better than creating a GUID... –  Paul Oct 23 '13 at 18:09
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

I have same scenario in my web-application and it is working in the following way:

we have in database:

Permission contains View, Add, Edit, Delete

Feature contains all the feature which can be set over role

FeaturePermission bind the feature with permission like which feature has what permisssion

UserRole has the role of a user

RoleFeaturePermission shows that which role has what permission to allowed

Now in code I do when a user authenticate I generate the list of permission assigned to it with features then I defined an Enum like:

public enum FeatureValue
{
    Custom = 1,
    Schedule = 2,
    Export=3          
}

public enum PermissionValue
{
    View = 1,
    Add = 2,
    Edit = 3,
    Delete = 4
}

and the UserPermission static class to get authorization:

  public static bool VerifyPermission(FeatureValue feature, PermissionValue permission, int id) {
      return getFeaturePermissionsForReport(feature, permission, id);
  }


  private static bool getFeaturePermissionsForReport(FeatureValue feature, PermissionValue permission, int id) {
      SessionHelper sessionHelper = new SessionHelper(null);
      UserModel userModel = sessionHelper .getUser()//get user from session.

      if (userModel != null && userModel.IsAuthorized == false) return false;

      UserProfile userProfile = sessionHelper.Get<UserProfile> ();

      if (userProfile != null && userProfile.AssignedRoleList != null) {
          List<Core.Entities.FeaturePermission> featurePermission = userProfile.AssignedRoleList.SelectMany(b => b.RoleFeaturePermission).ToList();


          if (featurePermission != null) {
              if (featurePermission.Count(f = > f.Feature.Id == (int) feature && f.Permission.Id == (int) permission) > 0) {
                  bool isAllowed= false;

                  int featurePermissionId = featurePermission.Where(f = > f.Feature.Id == (int) feature && f.Permission.Id == (int) permission).Select(i = > i.Id).FirstOrDefault();
                  isAllowed = (reports.Count(r = > (r.FeaturePermissionId == featurePermissionId && r.Id == id)) > 0) ? true : false;

                  return isAllowed;
              }
          }
      }

      return false;
  }

and now one each link, button or action use:

 @if (UserPermission.VerifyPermission(FeatureValue.Custom, PermissionValue.Edit))
 {
    //action  link to edit custom view
 }

and for action custom attribute is:

  [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All,AllowMultiple=true)]
    public class CustomFeaturePermissionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
    {
        private FeatureValue[] feature;
        private PermissionValue[] permission;
        private bool excludeParamId;
        /// <summary>
        /// Set values of featurelist and permission list
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="featureList"></param>
        /// <param name="permissionList"></param>
        public CustomFeaturePermissionAttribute(object featureList,object permissionList, int excludeParamId)
        {
            FeatureList = (FeatureValue[])featureList;
            PermissionList = (PermissionValue[])permissionList;
            ExcludeParamId = excludeParamId;
        }
        public FeatureValue[] FeatureList
        {
            get
            {
                return feature;
            }
            set
            {
                feature = value;
            }
        }

        public bool ExcludeParamId
        {
            get
            {
                return excludeParamId;
            }
            set
            {
                excludeParamId = value;
            }
        }

        public PermissionValue[] PermissionList
        {
            get
            {
                return permission;
            }
            set
            {
                permission = value;
            }
        }
        public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);

            bool isAccessAllowed = false;
            FeatureValue feature;
            PermissionValue permission;

            for (int i = 0; i < FeatureList.Count(); i++)
            {
                feature = FeatureList[i];
                permission = PermissionList[i];

                    isAccessAllowed = UserPermission.VerifyPermission(feature, permission, Convert.ToInt16(ExcludeParamId));

                if (isAccessAllowed)
                    break;
            }

            if (!isAccessAllowed)
            {
                filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(new RouteValueDictionary(new { action = "UnauthorizedAccess", controller = "Security" }));
            } 

        }
    }

and on actions allow role having view permission over Custom and Export:

[CustomFeaturePermission(new FeatureValue[] { FeatureValue.Custom, FeatureValue.Export }, new PermissionValue[] { PermissionValue.View, PermissionValue.View},pageId)]
public ActionResult Custom()
{
   //action body
}
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I would create an abstract way of defining each permission, such as an enum. For example:

public enum UserPermissions
{
    ViewCars,
    EditCars,
    DeleteCars,
    ViewUsers,
    EditUsers,
    DeleteUsers
}

You could create these in the database in a table called Permissions, then create a many-to-many mapping where each user can be assigned to any number of permissions.

Then you would create a custom authorization attribute by deriving from AuthorizeAttribute and override the OnAuthorization method to load the user from the database. This is exactly what you have done in your question except the key part is that you want to add some property where you can define the permission(s) needed for an action, like so:

public class UserPermissionsAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public IEnumerable<UserPermissions> PermissionsRequired { get; set; }

    public UserPermissionsAttribute()
    {
    }

    public UserPermissionsAttribute(params UserPermissions[] permissionsRequired)
    {
        PermissionsRequired = permissionsRequired;
    }

    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        var user = filterContext.HttpContext.User; // get user from DB

        if (PermissionsRequired.All(x => user.Permissions.Any(y => x == y)))
        {
            // all permissions are met
            base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new UnauthorizedAccessException();
        }

        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);
    }
}

Now you can decorate each action or controller with a permission or list of permissions:

[UserPermissions(UserPermissions.ViewCars, UserPermissions.EditCars)]
public ActionResult Index()
{
    ViewBag.Title = "Home Page";

    return View();
}

This way you separate your permission system from MVC controller/action logic.

Although I'd advise against this method of storing each permission on an individual basis. The role system keeps things much simpler and will improve performance. I really think you could do this with a number of fine-grained roles instead of fine-grained permissions.

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am not sure if the implementation is good enough. But I agree that having a set of permissions is much better way to go than saving in database the action/controller/view thing. –  A Khudairy Oct 18 '13 at 20:18
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Note that Authorizing users to see specific page elements differs from Authorizing for CRUD or other database operations, unless the elements point to operational Actions in Controller. Consider that you may have some elements that there's no need to be saw by a specific user, and don't have specific database operation. Till now we conclude that we need the following permissions :

  1. Permission to See
  2. Permission to Command

I believe that you can use Microsoft Role Provider for both parts. According to MSDN Documentation Considering that :

The Authorize attribute lets you indicate that authorization is restricted to predefined roles or to individual users. This gives you a high degree of control over who is authorized to view any page on the site.

In The next step/question is how to do that?

I think 3 ways are available to meet our purpose:

  • Solution 1: Creating separate Views with specific page elements due to forwarding each user to related View. In this scenario we must create separate controller actions too. we have to check user types before each action like [Authorise(Roles="Administrator")]. We forced to have static (Pre-defined) Roles and Accessibility. And in one sentence Not a good solution because of redundancy and instability.

  • Solution 2: Creating pages Dynamically simply by adding some if conditions for each access restricted element in One Page(for example Edit Page). That is like employing @if (User.IsInRole("Admin")) to authorize specific users and show related page elements like buttons. In Controller side we can use if conditions (not as FilterAttribute due to add dynamic functionality based on generated/added new roles) and control valid transactions against database. Although FilterAttributes add some great functionalists (like performance optimization). In one sentence A moderate solution.

  • Solution 3: Act like solution 2, just fix Controller problem by creating our own custom FilterAttribute for authorization. That will inherited from AuthorizeAttribute and overrides the OnAuthorize method to do what you need only for Operations.

For Example :

public class TableAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public enum TableAction
    {
        Read,
        Create,
        Update,
        Delete
    }
    public TableAction Action { get; set; }
    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);
        //do custom authorizization using Action and getting TableEntryID 
        //from filterContext.HttpContext.Request.QueryString or
        //filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Form
    }
}

And its usage will be like this :

[TableAuthorize(Action=TableAuthorizeAttribute.TableAction.Update)]

Here is complete example about above concept. Here is complete example for creating dynamic AuthorizeAttribute for authorizing new roles added to application.

Solution 3 in one sentence A perfect but Complex Solution.

Note that by using FilterAttribute before Actions we have limited our application to static/predefined roles. No need to use another Data Structure or generate tables in Database.

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I've seen a similar implementation in the past which utilized a token concept.

Each Action method is represented by a token. A selection of tokens define a role. A role is assigned to a user.

I used a simple console application to reflect my MVC application and look for all Controllers and determine every action method within them.

Store these "Tokens" in your database along with your roles.

The implementation kept it simple and just used the fully qualified name with namespaces etc to identify them. This way the data has to be specific to your application which can increase security

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I would take Trevor's approach, but It wouldn't use an attribute. I would create a common action permission enum like :


[Flags]
internal enum PermissionsEnum
{
    listbutton   = 1,
    editbutton   = 2,
    deletebutton = 4,
    savebutton   = 8,
    createbutton = 16,
    action03 = 32,
    action04 = 64,
    action05 = 128,
    action06 = 256,
    action07 = 512,
    action08 = 1024,
    action09 = 2048,
    action10 = 4096,
    action11 = 8192,
    action12 = 16384,
    action13 = 32768
}

Such a permission object I store for every area/controller and user in the database like with some additional constraints permission value -1 not allowed to call the action and permission value 0 to call the action but no other permissions:


Controller/Action   UserId    Permission
=================   ======    =========
cars/delete         User0001  -1 
cars/edit           User0001  8  
cars/index          User0001  0
cars/list           User0001  16
cars/show           User0001  2

The apply the permissions I would create a base controller. When ever an action is called, the base controller retrieves the permissions for the called controller:


var currentController = this.Url.RouteData["controller"];
var currentAction = this.Url.RouteData["action"];
var currentUserPermissons = GetUserPermissonForController(string.Format("{0}/{1}",currentController,currentAction), userId);
if( 0 > currentUserPermissons ) RedirectToAction("PermissonDenied","Error");
ViewBag.UserPermissons = (PermissionsEnum)currentUserPermissons;

In each view I would check the ViewBag.UserPermissons before create a protected item like:


@{ if((ViewBag.UserPermissons & PermissionsEnum.listbutton) == PermissionsEnum.listbutton)
    {
        @Html.ActionLink("Listitems","List")
    }
}
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