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I am trying to learn C# and I am up to an example that uses a boolean. For the life of me I cant figure out why the program isnt noticing that I am trying to pass a value of true to the boolean. Here is the code in the Form.cs:

namespace WindowsFormsApplication7
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HappyBirthday birthdayMessage = new HappyBirthday();
        string returnedMessage;

        birthdayMessage.PresentCount = 5;
        birthdayMessage.MyProperty = "Adam";
        birthdayMessage.hasParty = true;
        returnedMessage = birthdayMessage.MyProperty;

        MessageBox.Show(returnedMessage);

    }
}
}

Here is the Class that I created:

class HappyBirthday
{

//====================
//  CLASS VARIABLES
//====================
private int numberOfPresents;
private string birthdayMessage;
private bool birthdayParty;

//===========================
//  DEFAULT CONSTRUCTOR
//===========================
public HappyBirthday()
{
    numberOfPresents = 0;
    //birthdayParty = false;
}

//===========================
//      METHOD
//===========================
private string getMessage(string givenName)
{

    string theMessage;

    theMessage = "Happy Birthday " + givenName + "\n";
    theMessage += "Number of presents = ";
    theMessage += numberOfPresents.ToString() + "\n";

    if (birthdayParty == true)
    {
        theMessage += "Hope you enjoy the party!";
    }
    else
    {
        theMessage += "No party = sorry!";
    }

    return theMessage;
}

//================================
//      READ AND WRITE PROPERTY
//================================
public string MyProperty
{
    get { return birthdayMessage; }

    set { birthdayMessage = getMessage(value); }
}

//================================
//     WRITE-ONLY PROPERTY
//================================
public int PresentCount
{
    set { numberOfPresents = value; }
}

public bool hasParty
{
    set { birthdayParty = value; }
}

}

Now I set the initial value to false (even though if my understanding is correct that should be the default value), but when I try to set it = true, the program does not recognize it. Am I supposed to pass a boolean differently then I would a string or int?

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3  
Just wondering if you've set a breakpoint and ran it through a the debugger? You can learn a lot about your logic flow and why things aren't working by doing that. It's perfectly OK to ask here, mind you,just offering a tip in case you weren't aware of how to do that. –  David Stratton Oct 18 '13 at 20:24
    
After 9 hours of working and studying my brain is fried, I totally forgot about stepping through the code. Thanks for the reminder! –  user2405778 Oct 18 '13 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're setting MyProperty before you're setting hasParty. getMessage() is not being called every time MyProperty is polled.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much, I cant believe it was only that. I thought I was going crazy. I will accept your answer when the site allows me. –  user2405778 Oct 18 '13 at 20:24
2  
Yes, this is the right answer. Also, this whole MyProperty idea is not a good implementation. A function that uses this class should be able to treat each property as an associated field or object. MyProperty represents a person's name if you are setting, but a birthday message if you are getting. Instead, make a Name property and a message property. The message will have a getter, but no setter, and the getter uses the Name value that you have set. And if no name is set, it could give a different message, like "Who?" –  Mark Bailey Oct 18 '13 at 20:32
1  
Thank you for the explanation @Mark, Im sure there is a better way to code it but I am trying to follow this tutorial as much as possible. I am starting to realize, as helpful as it is, I will get more out of coming up with my own projects and learning through coding my own things. –  user2405778 Oct 18 '13 at 20:36
1  
@user2405778: I've also had tutorials that perhaps did more harm than good. My recommendation is to follow it closely until you get your code compile and run correctly, and then refactor it until you understand it. –  Jon of All Trades Oct 18 '13 at 21:17

The way MyProperty works is confusing, because the set and get deal with different values (you set the name, and then get the whole message, which is confusing). I'd replace it with a GivenName property and then make the GetMessage() (or expose it as a read-only property Message) public.

Also, you can make your code much simpler by using auto-properties (you can use private gets to keep the write-only behavior, though in the real world write-only properties are very rare, and you should probably just make them public like the sets). And since the default int value is 0, you don't need to specify your default constructor. Here's how the code looks now:

class HappyBirthday
{
    public string Message
    {
        get
        {
            string theMessage;

            theMessage = "Happy Birthday " + GivenName + "\n";
            theMessage += "Number of presents = ";
            theMessage += PresentCount.ToString() + "\n";

            if (HasParty)
            {
                theMessage += "Hope you enjoy the party!";
            }
            else
            {
                theMessage += "No party = sorry!";
            }

            return theMessage;
        }
    }

    public string GivenName { private get; set; }

    public int PresentCount { private get; set; }

    public bool HasParty { private get; set; }
}
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