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I have been trying to solve a Java exercise on a Codility web page.

Below is the link to the mentioned exercise and my solution.

https://codility.com/demo/results/demoH5GMV3-PV8

Can anyone tell what can I correct in my code in order to improve the score?

Just in case here is the task description:

A small frog wants to get to the other side of a river. The frog is currently located at position 0, and wants to get to position X. Leaves fall from a tree onto the surface of the river.

You are given a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers representing the falling leaves. A[K] represents the position where one leaf falls at time K, measured in minutes.

The goal is to find the earliest time when the frog can jump to the other side of the river. The frog can cross only when leaves appear at every position across the river from 1 to X.

For example, you are given integer X = 5 and array A such that:

  A[0] = 1
  A[1] = 3
  A[2] = 1
  A[3] = 4
  A[4] = 2
  A[5] = 3
  A[6] = 5
  A[7] = 4

In minute 6, a leaf falls into position 5. This is the earliest time when leaves appear in every position across the river.

Write a function:

class Solution { public int solution(int X, int[] A); } 

that, given a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers and integer X, returns the earliest time when the frog can jump to the other side of the river.

If the frog is never able to jump to the other side of the river, the function should return −1.

For example, given X = 5 and array A such that:

  A[0] = 1
  A[1] = 3
  A[2] = 1
  A[3] = 4
  A[4] = 2
  A[5] = 3
  A[6] = 5
  A[7] = 4

the function should return 6, as explained above. Assume that:

    N and X are integers within the range [1..100,000];
    each element of array A is an integer within the range [1..X].

Complexity:

    expected worst-case time complexity is O(N);
    expected worst-case space complexity is O(X), beyond input storage (not counting the storage required for input arguments).

Elements of input arrays can be modified.

And here is my solution:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

class Solution {

    public int solution(int X, int[] A) {
        int list[] = A;
        int sum = 0;
        int searchedValue = X;

        List<Integer> arrayList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        for (int iii = 0; iii < list.length; iii++) {

            if (list[iii] <= searchedValue && !arrayList.contains(list[iii])) {
                sum += list[iii];
                arrayList.add(list[iii]);
            }
            if (list[iii] == searchedValue) {
                if (sum == searchedValue * (searchedValue + 1) / 2) {
                    return iii;
                }
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}

Kind Regards

Przemek

share|improve this question
2  
You should put your problem in your question, otherwise if that link goes down, this question becomes useless. – Filipe Silva Oct 18 '13 at 21:37
    
For example, given X = 7 and array A such that: A[0] = 1 A[1] = 3 A[2] = 1 A[3] = 4 A[4] = 2 A[5] = 5 the function should return 3, could you explain as well ? – Shrivatsan Mar 14 '15 at 11:49

14 Answers 14

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You are using arrayList.contains inside a loop, which will traverse the whole list unnecessarily.

Here is my solution (I wrote it some time ago, but I believe it scores 100/100):

    public int frog(int X, int[] A) {
        int steps = X;
        boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[steps+1];
        for(int i = 0; i < A.length; i++){
            if(!bitmap[A[i]]){
                bitmap[A[i]] = true;
                steps--;
            }
            if(steps == 0) return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It gives 100/100, But when I have int A[] = {6,4,3,2,1,5}; int steps = 5; I get Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 6 I believe you have to omit values that A[i] > X; – pshemek Oct 19 '13 at 12:28
    
The spec said that array A only contains elements in range [1,X] so the code is valid I think. Always read the spec very carefully, sometimes some constraint can lead you to solve a problem in a way you wouldn't have thought of without it. You should also accept answers if you think they helped you. – rafalio Oct 20 '13 at 13:06
    
For example, given X = 7 and array A such that: A[0] = 1 A[1] = 3 A[2] = 1 A[3] = 4 A[4] = 2 A[5] = 5 the function should return 3, could you explain as well ? – Shrivatsan Mar 14 '15 at 11:49
    
modified this code a bit to make it 100/100 solution. added a 'if' condition that filters out the invalid input case of A.length<X - public int solution(int X, int[] A) { if (A.length >= X) { long total = X; boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[A.length+1]; for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) { if (!bitmap[A[i]]) { bitmap[A[i]] = true; total--; if (total == 0) return i; } } } return -1; } – Quest Monger Apr 19 '15 at 7:12
    
@QuestMonger is my code no longer 100/100 without that check? It was before, but maybe the test cases were updated. I would be surprised if it didn't pass though since the array has at most 100k elements, not that many. – rafalio Apr 21 '15 at 15:50

Here is my solution. It got me 100/100:

public int solution(int X, int[] A)
{
     int[] B = A.Distinct().ToArray();
     return (B.Length != X) ? -1 : Array.IndexOf<int>(A, B[B.Length - 1]);
}
share|improve this answer

100/100

public static int solution (int X, int[] A){

    int[]counter = new int[X+1];
    int ans = -1;
    int x = 0;

    for (int i=0; i<A.length; i++){
        if (counter[A[i]] == 0){
            counter[A[i]] = A[i];
            x += 1;
            if (x == X){
                return i;
            }
        } 
    }

    return ans;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's my solution. It isn't perfect, but it's good enough to score 100/100. (I think that it shouldn't have passed a test with a big A and small X)

Anyway, it fills a new counter array with each leaf that falls

counter has the size of X because I don't care for leafs that fall farther than X, therefore the try-catch block.

AFTER X leafs fell (because it's the minimum amount of leafs) I begin checking whether I have a complete way - I'm checking that every int in count is greater than 0. If so, I return i, else I break and try again.

public static int solution(int X, int[] A){
    int[] count = new int[X];
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++){
        try{
            count[A[i]-1]++;
        } catch (ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){ }
        if (i >= X - 1){
            for (int j = 0; j< count.length; j++){
                if (count[j] == 0){
                    break;
                }
                if (j == count.length - 1){
                    return i;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
share|improve this answer

Better approach would be to use Set, because it only adds unique values to the list. Just add values to the Set and decrement X every time a new value is added, (Set#add() returns true if value is added, false otherwise); have a look,

public static int solution(int X, int[] A) {
    Set<Integer> values = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (values.add(A[i])) X--; 
        if (X == 0) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}

do not forget to import,

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;
share|improve this answer

Here's my solution with 100 / 100.

public int solution(int X, int[] A) {
    int len = A.length;
    if (X > len) {
        return -1;
    }
    int[] isFilled = new int[X];
    int jumped = 0;
    Arrays.fill(isFilled, 0);
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        int x = A[i];
        if (x <= X) {
            if (isFilled[x - 1] == 0) {
                isFilled[x - 1] = 1;
                jumped += 1;
                if (jumped == X) {
                    return i;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return -1;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's my solution, scored 100/100:

import java.util.HashSet;

class Solution {
    public int solution(int X, int[] A) {
        HashSet<Integer> hset = new HashSet<Integer>();

        for (int i = 0 ; i < A.length; i++) {
            if (A[i] <= X)
               hset.add(A[i]);   
            if (hset.size() == X)
               return i;
        }

        return -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A Java solution using Sets (Collections Framework) Got a 100%

import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeSet;
public class Froggy {
    public static int solution(int X, int[] A){
    int steps=-1;
    Set<Integer> values = new TreeSet<Integer>();
    for(int i=0; i<A.length;i++){
        if(A[i]<=X){
            values.add(A[i]);
        }
        if(values.size()==X){
            steps=i;
            break;
        }
    }
        return steps;
    }
share|improve this answer

Just tried this problem as well and here is my solution. Basically, I just declared an array whose size is equal to position X. Then, I declared a counter to monitor if the necessary leaves have fallen at the particular spots. The loop exits when these leaves have been met and if not, returns -1 as instructed.

class Solution {
    public int solution(int X, int[] A) {
        int size = A.length;
        int[] check = new int[X];
        int cmp = 0;
        int time = -1;

        for (int x = 0; x < size; x++) {
            int temp = A[x];
            if (temp <= X) {
                if (check[temp-1] > 0) {
                    continue;
                }
                check[temp - 1]++;
                cmp++;
            }

            if ( cmp == X) {
                time = x;
                break;
            }
        }

        return time;
    }
}

It got a 100/100 on the evaluation but I'm not too sure of its performance. I am still a beginner when it comes to programming so if anybody can critique the code, I would be grateful.

share|improve this answer

Maybe it is not perfect but its straightforward. Just made a counter Array to track the needed "leaves" and verified on each iteration if the path was complete. Got me 100/100 and O(N).

    public static int frogRiver(int X, int[] A)
    {
        int leaves = A.Length;
        int[] counter = new int[X + 1];
        int stepsAvailForTravel = 0;

        for(int i = 0; i < leaves; i++)
        {
            //we won't get to that leaf anyway so we shouldnt count it,
            if (A[i] > X)
            {
                continue;
            } 
            else
            {
                //first hit!, keep a count of the available leaves to jump
                if (counter[A[i]] == 0)
                    stepsAvailForTravel++;

                counter[A[i]]++;

            }
            //We did it!!
            if (stepsAvailForTravel == X)
            {
                return i;
            }
        }

        return -1;

    }
share|improve this answer

This is my solution. I think it's very simple. It gets 100/100 on codibility. set.contains() let me eliminate duplicate position from table. The result of first loop get us expected sum. In the second loop we get sum of input values.

class Solution {
    public int solution(int X, int[] A) {

        Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
        int sum1 = 0, sum2 = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i <= X; i++){
            sum1 += i;       
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++){
            if (set.contains(A[i])) continue;
            set.add(A[i]);
            sum2 += A[i];
            if (sum1 == sum2) return i;
        }        
        return -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's what I have in C#. It can probably still be refactored. We throw away numbers greater than X, which is where we want to stop, and then we add numbers to an array if they haven't already been added. When the count of the list has reached the expected number, X, then return the result. 100%

        var tempArray = new int[X+1];
        var totalNumbers = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
        {
            if (A[i] > X || tempArray.ElementAt(A[i]) != 0)
                continue;
            tempArray[A[i]] = A[i];
            totalNumbers++;

            if (totalNumbers == X)
                return i;
        }

        return -1;
share|improve this answer

This is my solution. It uses 3 loops but is constant time and gets 100/100 on codibility.

class FrogLeap
{
    internal int solution(int X, int[] A)
    {
        int result = -1;
        long max = -1;
        var B = new int[X + 1];

        //initialize all entries in B array with -1
        for (int i = 0; i <= X; i++)
        {
            B[i] = -1;
        }

        //Go through A and update B with the location where that value appeared
        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
        {
           if( B[A[i]] ==-1)//only update if still -1
            B[A[i]] = i;
        }

        //start from 1 because 0 is not valid
        for (int i = 1; i <= X; i++)
        {
            if (B[i] == -1)
                return -1;
            //The maxValue here is the earliest time we can jump over
            if (max < B[i])
                max = B[i];
        }

        result = (int)max;
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is linear time. – Wrench Sep 14 '15 at 21:12

JavaScript 100%

function solution(X, A) {
  var i, len = A.length,
    jumped = 0,
    P = new Array(X);

  if (X > len) {
    return -1;
  }

  for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    P[i] = 0;
  }


  for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (A[i] <= X) {
      if (P[A[i] - 1] === 0) {
        P[A[i] - 1] = 1;
        jumped++;
        if (jumped === X) {
          return i;
        }
      }
    }

  }
  return -1;
}

share|improve this answer
1  
This question is for Java, not JavaScript. – Pang Nov 6 '15 at 3:06
    
True, but I searched the answer for js and could find only this page, and I am sure I am not the only one :) – RnG May 27 at 13:41

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