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def player(beans):
#forced on 9 
   while beans > 15 :
        if beans == 16 :
            return 3
        if beans == 15 :
              return 1
        if beans == 14 :
            return 1
        if beans == 13 :
            return 1
        if beans == 12 :
            return 3
        if beans == 11 :
            return 2
        if beans == 10 :
            return 1
        if beans == 9 :
            return 1
        if beans == 8 :
            return 3
        if beans == 7 :
            return 2
        if beans == 6 :
            return 1
        if beans == 5 :
            return 1
        if beans == 4 :
            return 3
        if beans == 3 :
            return 2
        if beans == 2 :
            return 1
        if beans == 1 :
            return 1
        else:
            def player(beans):
                if beans == 15 :
                    return 3
                if beans == 14 :
                    return 2
                if beans == 13 :
                    return 1
                if beans == 12 :
                    return 3
                if beans == 11 :
                    return 2
                if beans == 10 :
                    return 1
#forced on 9
                if beans == 9 :
                    return 1
                if beans == 8 :
                    return 3
                if beans == 7 :
                    return 2
                if beans == 6 :
                    return 1
                if beans == 5 :
                    return 1
                if beans == 4 :
                    return 3
                if beans == 3 :
                    return 2 
                if beans == 2 :
                    return 1
                if beans == 1 :
                    return 1
                return beans - 1

I am currently running a bean program against other players, i have written my code but am a little confused on how to execute it in the order i would like it to. So the program is to count beans between you and another player. You start at 16 beans, and can grab only 1, 2, or 3 at a time. The player to pick up the last bean loses. The first set of "ifs" i've coded, is the set that i would like to have if i was the one to first start the pick of beans. and the second set of "if"s after the else statement i would like to have if i don't have first pick. You play a x amount of games, and half of those games you get to start, then the other half player 2 starts. If someone could give me tips on how i could make it so that the first set of "ifs" don't execute after it lands on a lower if statement ex: if beans == 13 so it doesn't take it from the top half of the code if you could give me tips i would greatly appreciate it.

share|improve this question
    
im not a python programmer but in this case you can try switch statement –  Drixson Oseña Oct 19 '13 at 0:55
3  
@DrixsonOseña sadly Python has no switch –  PepperoniPizza Oct 19 '13 at 0:56
1  
@DrixsonOseña Believe it or not, this is Python's switch statement. Yeah, I don't like it either. –  Christian Ternus Oct 19 '13 at 0:58
2  
@ChristianTernus You can use an anonymous dict as a switch statement in Python. I always use this over repetitive if statements. –  SethMMorton Oct 19 '13 at 1:04
    
That's a sad case for python. –  Drixson Oseña Oct 19 '13 at 1:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can simply place this as a method. Make a variable beans and give it an int of 16. From there you can use else statements to help execute your code, or simply use a loop as tcaswell described. Here is a perfect example to help you master the game as there actually is a trick to it where you will win 50% of the time. http://www.algebra.com/algebra/homework/Probability-and-statistics.faq.question.312866.html

share|improve this answer

I would re-factor this to use a dictionary

bean_dict = {16: 3, 15: 1,...}
if bean_count in bean_dict:
    return bean_dict[bean_count]
return bean_count - 1

As pointed out in the comments by @nneonneo this can be compressed further to a single line:

return bean_dict.get(bean_count, bean_count-1)
share|improve this answer
3  
Alternatively, instead of hardcoding responses, one could generalize them using a formula (if there is any), e.g. return {0:3, 1:1, 2:1, 3:2}[beans % 4]. This way the logic will be more clear. –  Bogdan Oct 19 '13 at 1:04
    
@Bogdan I agree, but I did not try to reverse the engineer the pattern. –  tcaswell Oct 19 '13 at 1:20
    
Slight modification: return bean_dict.get(bean_count, bean_count-1) –  nneonneo Oct 19 '13 at 1:25
    
@nneonneo Good point, edited answer. –  tcaswell Oct 19 '13 at 1:31
    
+1 The whole point of a good language is to allow better abstractions (better expressions of intent) to work with! –  Preet Sangha Oct 19 '13 at 1:48

You need to keep your state in a variable. Generally you'd keep it in a specific scope but for this toy example you can store it globally.

first_pick=False

first_pick_dict = {16: 3 , 15: 1, 14: 1 ,...}
second_pick_dict = {15: 3, 14: 2, 13: 1 ,...}

def player(beans):
  global first_pick
  if beans == 16:
    first_pick=True

  if first_pick:
    chosen_dict = first_pick_dict
  else:
    chosen_dict = second_pick_dict
  if beans in chosen_dict:
    return chosen_dict[beans]
  return beans - 1
share|improve this answer
    
you don't need the line chosen_dict = {} –  tcaswell Oct 19 '13 at 2:39
    
@tcaswell yeah, I don't do much python, scope in python confuses me highly, forgot the global as well. –  PeterT Oct 19 '13 at 2:45

One could separate out the two "sets of ifs" into two separate functions first_pick(beans) and second_pick(beans). Then, in pseudocode, you could do something like:

if I_Start:
  first_pick(beans)
else:
  second_pick(beans)
share|improve this answer

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