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I've got a class assignment in C++ that basically wants to me to use a struct and as well an array or two to allow customers to view and select items from a breakfast menu. Whenever I go to run the program it just says that it exited with a return value of 0. I've tried spot checking and I can't figure out what's wrong. I suspect I may not be loading the data from the text file correctly and thus it's causing no results because no data is loaded.

Here is my code:

    //Student Name:  Jacob Gillespie

    //Date:  10/18/13

    //Program:  Breakfast Billing System

    //Summary:  Program allows customer to select different items from a menu and sums up 

their total

//Headers
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

//Define structs

struct menuItemType
{
    string menuItem;
    double menuPrice;
};

//Declare variables and arrays

ifstream inData;

const double tax = 0.05;

int itemSelected[8];

menuItemType menuList[8];


//Provide function prototypes

void getData(ifstream& inFile);
void showMenu();

void printCheck();

void customerSelection();




//Main Program Execution

int main()
{
    //Initialize itemSelected to 0

for (int counter = 0; counter < 8; counter++)
    itemSelected[counter] = 0;

    //Open input file
inData.open("menu.txt");

        //Execute functions
void getData(ifstream& inData); 
void showMenu();
void customerSelection();
void printCheck();



inData.close();
return 0;
}

//Function Definitions

    //getData
void getData(ifstream& inFile)
{
    for (int counter = 0; counter < 8; counter++)
    {
        inData >> menuList[counter].menuItem
           >> menuList[counter].menuPrice;
    }
}

    //showMenu
void showMenu()
{
    for (int counter = 0; counter < 8; counter++)
    cout << menuList[counter].menuItem << " " << menuList[counter].menuPrice << endl;
}

    //printCheck
void printCheck()
{
    double total = 0;
    double addedTax = 0;

    for (int counter = 0; counter < 8; counter++)
        if (itemSelected[counter] = 1)
    {
        cout << menuList[counter].menuItem << " " << menuList[counter].menuPrice << endl;
        total = total + menuList[counter].menuPrice;
    }

addedTax = total * tax;

cout << "Tax " << addedTax << endl;
cout << "Amount Due " << total << endl;

}

    //customerSelection
void customerSelection()
{
string choice;

for (int counter = 0; counter < 8; counter++)
    {
        cout << "If you would like to order the item, " << menuList[counter].menuItem << ", please enter 'yes'. "
        << endl << "If not, please enter 'no'." << endl;
        if (choice == "yes")
            itemSelected[counter] = 1;
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The voids before all the function calls in main are unnecessary where you have

//Execute functions

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1  
More to the point. those void-s are causing all those functions to be declarations rather than invocations. And as declarations, they're do exactly nothing. –  WhozCraig Oct 19 '13 at 4:38
    
Thank you guys so much! It works now! It's silly how obvious that should be but that shows how looking at something from the outside allows you to spot even the little things. –  TheGuy101 Oct 20 '13 at 2:34

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