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I'm reading The C Programming Language by K&R and in the section on structures I came across these code snippets:

struct maxpt = { 320, 200 };

and

/* addpoints: add two points */
struct addpoint(struct point p1, struct point p2)
{
    p1.x += p2.x;
    p1.y += p2.y;
    return p1;
}

In the first case, it looks like it's assigning the values 320 and 200 to the members of the variable maxpt. But I noticed the name of the struct type is missing (shouldn't it be "struct struct_name maxpt = {320, 200}"? In the second case, the function return type is just "struct" and not "struct name_of_struct".

I don't get why they don't include the struct names - how does it know what particular type of structure it's dealing with? My confusion is compounded by the fact that in previous snippets they do include the structure name, such as in the return type for the following function, where it's "struct point" and not just "struct". Why do they include the name in some cases and not in others?

/* makepoint: make a point from x and y components */
struct point makepoint(int x, int y)
{
    struct point temp;
    temp.x = x;
    temp.y = y;
    return temp;
}
share|improve this question
    
What edition are you referencing? What page is this on? – Jeremy West Oct 19 '13 at 3:59
1  
struct maxpt = { 320, 200 }; won't compile. I'm almost sure that's not actually in your book. If it is, it's wrong. – Carl Norum Oct 19 '13 at 4:00
    
I am vaguely familiar with the sections in K&R to which you are referring, there are conversations that go on across pages, and sometimes a statement on page x, will be making observations about a variable definition that was created on page x-3. Common occurrence in that book. – ryyker Oct 19 '13 at 4:03
    
@CarlNorum, Yes it does... typedef struct { int a, int b } TEMP; then TEMP temp = {234, 345 }; – ryyker Oct 19 '13 at 4:08
1  
Yes what does? The tag's not missing in that example, the struct keyword is, because of the typedef. OP's question doesn't have that case. – Carl Norum Oct 19 '13 at 4:09
up vote 4 down vote accepted

My copy of K&R includes on page 128:

struct point maxpt = { 320, 200 };

and on page 130:

struct point addpoint(struct point p1, struct point p2)
{
    p1.x += p2.x;
    p1.y += p2.y;
    return p1;
}

This is the Second Edition, 47th printing, February 2011.

If your copy of K&R includes something else, I believe it's mistaken.

share|improve this answer
    
nice catch, confirms my vague recollections of conversations spanning many pages between variable definition, and use. :) – ryyker Oct 19 '13 at 4:22
    
Thanks a bunch for clearing that up. I'm using an ebook copy that's had a fair amount of grammatical typos so far, so I'm not suprised the mistakes extend to the important parts as well. – Tyler Oct 19 '13 at 4:28
    
Nice catch? It's blatantly obvious that the OP misquoted the book even without looking at it. – Jim Balter Oct 19 '13 at 4:32
    
@Tyler If you have an ebook copy of K&R that has the mistakes in your question, then delete it because a) it will terribly mislead you and b) it's stolen property. – Jim Balter Oct 19 '13 at 4:33
    
@Jim: I didn't misquote anything. That having been said, I'm starting to think a print copy would be worth the investment. – Tyler Oct 19 '13 at 4:43

This is a typo. I have the a copy witch has the same error on page 115, should be struct point maxpt = { 320, 200 };:

A structure declaration that is not followed by a list of variables reserves no storage; it merely describes a template or shape of a structure. If the declaration is tagged, however, the tag can be used later in definitions of instances of the structure. For example, given the declaration of point above,

 struct point pt;

defines a variable pt which is a structure of type `struct point``. A structure can be initialized by following its definition with a list of initializers, each a constant expression, for the members:

struct maxpt = { 320, 200 };

An automatic structure may also be initialized by assignment or by calling a function that returns a structure of the right type.

on page 117:

The next step is a set of functions to do arithmetic on points. For instance,

/* addpoints: add two points */
struct addpoint(struct point p1, struct point p2)
{
    p1.x += p2.x;
    p1.y += p2.y;
    return p1;
}

Here both the arguments and the return value are structures. We incremented the components in p1 rather than using an explicit temporary variable to emphasize that structure parameters are passed by value like any others.

share|improve this answer
    
BSH: Is yours a print copy or ebook? – Tyler Oct 19 '13 at 4:36
    
@Tyler It's ebook. – user1129665 Oct 19 '13 at 4:39
1  
Well, it looks like the ebook version is somehow corrupted. I've never encountered that with an e-version of a textbook before. Time to pony up the cash for a print copy I guess. – Tyler Oct 19 '13 at 4:47
    
You should both demand your money back. – Jim Balter Oct 19 '13 at 4:57

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