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This question already has an answer here:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#define SIZE 5

struct CircularQueue{
  int front,rear;
  int capacity;
  int *data;
};

typedef struct CircularQueue * Q;

// create  queue
Q createQueue(int size)
{
  Q q;
  q = malloc(sizeof(Q));
  if(!q)
    return NULL;
  q->front=q->rear=-1;
  q->capacity=size;
  q->data=malloc(sizeof(int)*q->capacity);  
  if(!q->data)
    return NULL;
  printf("Queue created successfully...\n");
  return q;
}

// Resize Queue (Here it is showing error in realloc )    
void resize(Q q)
{
  int size = q->capacity;
  q->capacity *=2;  

   // *****Error 
  q->data = realloc(q->data,sizeof(int)*q->capacity);
  // *****

  if(!q->data)
  {
    printf("memory error ...\n");
    return ;
  }
  if(q->front>q->rear)
  {
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<q->front;i++)
      q->data[i+size]=q->data[i];
    q->rear = q->rear+size;  
  }

} 

// Insert in Queue

void Enqueue(Q q,int data)
{
  if(IsQueueFull(q))
    resize(q);
  if(q->front==-1)
     q->front = q->rear=0;
  else
     q->rear = (q->rear+1)  % q->capacity;  
  q->data[q->rear]=data; 
}

int IsQueueFull(Q q)
{
  return (q->rear+1)%q->capacity==q->front;
}

int IsQueueEmpty(Q q)
{
  return q->front==-1;
}

// Delete from queue

int Dequeue(Q q)
{
  if(IsQueueEmpty(q)){
    printf("Queue is empty..\n");
    return -1;
  }
  int data = q->data[q->front];
  if(q->front==q->rear)
    q->front=q->rear=-1;
  else  
    q->front = (q->front+1)%q->capacity;
  return data;
}

void display(Q q)
{
  int i;
  printf("Queue Elements :\n");
  while(!IsQueueEmpty(q))
  {
    printf("%d ",Dequeue(q));
  }
  printf("\n");
}

void main()
{
  int data;
  Q q;
  q = createQueue(SIZE);
  printf("Data : %d\n",Dequeue(q));
  Enqueue(q,10);
  Enqueue(q,20);  
  Enqueue(q,30);
  Enqueue(q,99);
  printf("Data : %d\n",Dequeue(q));
  printf("Data : %d\n",Dequeue(q));    
  Enqueue(q,2);
  Enqueue(q,9);
  Enqueue(q,19);
  Enqueue(q,29);
  display(q);
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jonathan Leffler c May 14 '14 at 6:20

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

1  
Most likely you write out of bounds on the data you already allocated. Use tools such as Valgrind to help you find it. – Joachim Pileborg Oct 19 '13 at 8:03
3  
Use a debugger and do not dump a lot of code – Ed Heal Oct 19 '13 at 8:04
3  
Q q; q = malloc(sizeof(Q)); typedef considered harmful. – wildplasser Oct 19 '13 at 8:13
    
@wildplasser And there you also (accidentally?) pointed out the most likely cause of the problem. – Joachim Pileborg Oct 19 '13 at 11:24
1  
Certainly not accidental. BTW: if(!q->data) return NULL; will leak memory. (just a tiny bit ...) – wildplasser Oct 19 '13 at 11:26

When you do sizeof(Q) in e.g. the line

q = malloc(sizeof(Q));

You actually only allocate size for a pointer, i.e. sizeof(struct CircularQueue *). This is only four or 8 bytes depending on platform (32 or 64 bits).

The actual size of the structure is 21 or 20 bytes (16 bytes plus padding) depending on 32 or 64 bit platform.

This leads to you writing beyond the allocated memory and you then have undefined behavior. What is most likely happening is that you overwrite data needed by the memory allocation system, so the realloc call later will fail rather catastrophically.

share|improve this answer

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