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This question builds up on my previous question: Difference Between *list and **list. I decided to split them into two questions to make it less confusing, clear, and fair for people answering.

I have this code:

typedef struct A
{
   char c[100];
}A;

listSize = 5000; 

A *list = malloc(listSize * sizeof(*list));

I want to call a function and create a pointer for every element.

How would I create 5000 pointers and make them point to the elements on the list?

p0 -> list[0]
p1 -> list[1]
..
..
p[n] -> list[n]
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2  
OT: listSize = 5000; won't compile. –  alk Oct 19 '13 at 9:09
    
Assuming it is an int, it should, no? –  Mike John Oct 19 '13 at 9:14
    
@MikeJohn, it should, but size_t is a better option –  Alter Mann Oct 19 '13 at 9:21
1  
Also check the result of malloc instead of cast the return :) –  Alter Mann Oct 19 '13 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
A** p = malloc(listSize * sizeof(A*));
int i;
for(i = 0; i < listSize; ++i) {
    p[i] = &list[i];
}
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typedef struct A
{
   char c[100];
}A;

size_t listSize = 5000; // !

A *list = malloc(listSize * sizeof(*list));
if (!list) {
    // complain about low memory and leave this part of function.
}

A** p = malloc(listSize * sizeof(A*));
if (!p) {
    // complain about low memory and leave this part of function.
    // Maybe free(list) in order not to leak memory.
}

Only then it is safe to write to p:

size_t i;
for(i = 0; i < listSize; ++i) {
    p[i] = &list[i];
}
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