Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an unformatted Fortran file, containing strings of different lengths, and I'm having trouble reading these strings with Fortran itself.

Sample program:

program test
implicit none
character(len=200) :: line

open(32,file="testfile",form="unformatted",action="write")
write(32) "A test string"
write(32) "Another longer test string"
close(32)

open(33,file="testfile",form="unformatted",action="read")
read(33) line
write(6,*) trim(line)
read(33) line
write(6,*) trim(line)
close(33)

end program test

This fails (compiled with gfortran) with:

At line 11 of file test.f90 (unit = 33, file = 'testfile')
Fortran runtime error: I/O past end of record on unformatted file

I could get it to work by trying the read with decreasing lengths and backspacing (read_string subroutine), but this looks highly inefficient:

program test
implicit none
character(len=200) :: line

open(32,file="testfile",form="unformatted",action="write")
write(32) "A test string"
write(32) "Another longer test string"
close(32)

open(33,file="testfile",form="unformatted",action="read")
call read_string(33,line)
write(6,*) trim(line)
call read_string(33,line)
write(6,*) trim(line)
close(33)

contains

subroutine read_string(u,string)
integer, intent(in) :: u
character(len=*), intent(out) :: string
integer :: i, error

do i=len(string),0,-1
  read(u,iostat=error) string(:i)
  if (error == 0) then
    string(i+1:) = ''
    exit
  end if
  backspace(u)
end do

end subroutine read_string

end program test

Is there a better way to read variable-length strings from unformatted files?

share|improve this question
1  
the short answer is do not use unformatted fortran. As you see you need to know the structure. If you have legacy files written that way you can open direct access or streams and decipher the so-called-unformatted format. That may be more painful than the solution you already worked out though. –  agentp Oct 19 '13 at 13:36
2  
if you really want to write files this way, two approaches would be to blank pad everything to a fixed length, or precede each string with an integer record informing the read code of the length of the string to read. –  agentp Oct 19 '13 at 13:49
    
@george Unfortunatelly I have to deal with legacy files (or files written by legacy code, which must be backward-compatible because there's other C code reading them). But modifying the writing code to pad all strings looks like a possible solution to look into. –  Jellby Oct 20 '13 at 18:16
    
Ok, as a bit of irony your C code has to read the "format" which specifies the byte lenght of the record and so the C "knows" the length of the string. You might study the c and consider doing the same in fortran (As I say, you need to open direct access or streams) –  agentp Oct 21 '13 at 18:15
    
..played with this a bit, the direct acess approach is really painful as you need ot read 1 byte records (because of your variable length strings) -- If you have a f2003 compiler with stream access it might be worth a try though. –  agentp Oct 21 '13 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

I slightly reworked your sample program, reading the file in binary. This works for Intel's compiler; gfortran does not know the binary format, so ymmv. See where I got my ideas at Intel's reference on record types

program test
implicit none
character(len=200) :: line
integer(4) recl_at_start, recl_at_end

open(32,file="testfile",form="unformatted",action="write")
write(32) "A test string"
write(32) "Another longer test string"
close(32)

! initialization is required to fill the line with blanks
! because trim() does not work on line filled with zero characters
line = ""

open(33,file="testfile",form="binary",action="read")

read(33) recl_at_start
read(33) line(1:recl_at_start)
read(33) recl_at_end
write(6,*) trim(line)

read(33) recl_at_start
read(33) line(1:recl_at_start)
read(33) recl_at_end
write(6,*) trim(line)

close(33)

end program test

its output is

A test string
Another longer test string

Now that you know the line length, trim() is not really necessary anymore. Just use

write(6,*) line(1:recl_at_start)

This also prevents troubles when you add "A shorter test string" to the data.

share|improve this answer
    
form="binary" has long been superseded by the standard access="stream" –  Vladimir F Mar 27 '14 at 14:36
    
Which is even mentioned in the comments above. –  Vladimir F Mar 27 '14 at 14:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.