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I'm new to PHP and PDO, and I try to use prepared statements here. After 1 hour of trying around I give up. Or my tutorial was just horribly bad.

EDIT:

This works perfectly without prepared statements:

try {
    $dbh = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test', 'root', 'root');
    $prepared = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * from sys_navigation_point WHERE name="root"');
    //$prepared->bindParam('foo', 'root');

    $prepared->execute();

    foreach($prepared as $row) {
        print_r($row);
    }
    $dbh = null;
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    print "Error!: " . $e->getMessage() . "<br/>";
    die();
}

But this does not work at all with a prepared statement. Getting a totally blank page when doing this:

try {
    $dbh = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test', 'root', 'root');
    $prepared = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * from sys_navigation_point WHERE name=:foo');
    $prepared->bindParam('foo', 'root');

    $prepared->execute();

    foreach($prepared as $row) {
        print_r($row);
    }
    $dbh = null;
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    print "Error!: " . $e->getMessage() . "<br/>";
    die();
}

foo should be replaced with root. However, it doesn't.

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You seem to have accepted an incorrect answer, and ignored the real answer (you are missing a : in the bindParam $prepared->bindParam(':foo', 'root')) –  rjmunro Feb 24 '12 at 10:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't use params for stuff like table and column names, it's meant to be used for data only, not for fully dynamic queries

This should work:

$prepared = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * from sy_navigation_point WHERE Foo=:whatever');
$prepared->bindParam('whatever', 'Bar');

EDIT: This should be the real solution.

By looking at the documentation, it's clear that the pattern has to be:

$prepared = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * from sy_navigation_point WHERE Foo=:whatever');
$prepared->bindParam('whatever', $value);

Then you do:

$value = 'Bar';
$prepared->execute();
share|improve this answer
    
does not work: I get a blank page as soon as I do any param binding –  openfrog Dec 22 '09 at 14:06
    
I've updated my question with better examples. It doesn't work. –  openfrog Dec 22 '09 at 14:11
    
Doesn't work, yet the answer is accepted? What was the solution? –  Sander Rijken Dec 22 '09 at 16:11
1  
Prepared Statements aren't for preventing SQL injections. They were invented to parse the SQL statement and build the execution plan once and then execute it multiple times using different values so one first sent the "raw" query and then, independently, all data. That this protects from SQL injection is a side-effect but not the intention. (Especially as it doesn't work in all areas, like dynamic field names etc.) –  johannes Dec 22 '09 at 23:11
    
This answer doesn't seem to apply to the question, possibly because it was edited. –  rjmunro Feb 24 '12 at 10:27

Try using the colon in the name, too while binding:

$prepared->bindParam(':foo', 'root');

As it is done in the docs: http://php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.bindparam.php

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I'm pretty sure that this is the right answer, and should be accepted. The other answers are getting PDO confused with MySQLi. –  rjmunro Feb 24 '12 at 10:22

Your bindParam's second parameter has to be a variable, otherwise you'll get a fatal error. So,

$value='root';
$prepared->bindParam('foo', $value);

or:

$prepared->bindValue('foo', 'root');


It's easy to figure out when error messages are displayed:

if ($in_development) ERROR_REPORTING(E_ALL);
// ... code
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http://www.php.net/manual/en/pdo.prepare.php A commenter there says that it doesn't work properly for keywords, table names, view names and field names So you'd need $prepared = $dbh->prepare('SELECT * from ' . $table);

As it only really works for column variables.

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I've updated my question with better examples. It doesn't work even for column variables. –  openfrog Dec 22 '09 at 14:11

You cannot bind a table in a MySQL prepared statement, you can only bind values. From the manual:

However, they are not allowed for identifiers (such as table or column names), or to specify both operands of a binary operator such as the = equal sign.

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