Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's assume I have a generic type like this one:

class GenericEchoer[T <: Any] {
    var content: T = _
    def echo: String = "Echo: " + content.toString
}

Then it is possible to create a mixin that would allow to extend functionality of GenericEchoer[T] like this:

trait Substitution[T <: AnyRef] extends GenericEchoer[T] {
    def substitute(newValue: T) = { content = newValue }
}

Having those defined, I can instantiate type in this way:

val echoer = new GenericEchoer[Int] with Substitution[Int]

My question is: how to implement similar functionality so that I can omit type parameters in the mixin? In other words, I'd like to be able to instantiate the same type with the following line:

val echoer = new GenericEchoer[Int] with Substitution

This, however, does not work, as Substitution "doesn't know" the underlying type parameter.

share|improve this question
    
If Substitution extends GenericEchoer then Susbstitution with GenericEchoer extends GenericEchoer twice. You might like to fix that. Also why do you constrain the type T <: AnyRef then try to use Int which is most definitely not an AnyRef –  Luigi Plinge Oct 19 '13 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You code is wrong, it won't even compile.

Your GenericEchoer cannot be a class, cause your content member is abstract, or you should init this with a default value:

class GenericEchoer[T <: AnyRef] {
    var content: T = _
    def echo: String = "Echo: " + T.toString
}

You can't write T.toString, i guess you wanted content.toString. You can't pass Int to it, cause Int has AnyVal as its supertype, and your upper bound of T is AnyRef.

self.content in Substitution is also illegal, you should:

1) make self as a selftype:

trait Substitution[T <: AnyRef] extends GenericEchoer[T] { self =>
    def substitute(newValue: T) = { self.content = newValue }
}

2) Replace it with this 3) Just leave { content = newValue }

As for your problem. No it's not possible. I can suggest you replace class with a trait and type constructor with an abstract type member:

trait GenericEchoer {
  type T <: AnyRef  
  var content: T = _
  def echo: String = "Echo: " + content.toString
}

trait Substitution extends GenericEchoer {
  def substitute(newValue: T) { content = newValue }
}

val enchoer = new GenericEchoer with Substitution { type T = String }

or better

val enchoer = new GenericEchoer with Substitution { 
  type T = String 
  var content = "Hello" // either case it will be null
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I fixed the mistakes you pointed out. I haven't thought about using type member - thank you. –  Wojciech Ptak Oct 19 '13 at 13:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.