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In postgres I want to know the time taken to generate plan. I know that \timing gives me the time taken to execute the plan after finding the optimal plan. But I want to find out the time which postgres takes in finding out the optimal plan. Is it possible to determine this time in postgres. If yes, then how?

Also query plan generators at times do not find the optimal plan. Can I force postgres to use the optimal plan for plan generation. If yes, then how can I do so?

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"Also query plan generators at times do not find the optimal plan." -- Are you actually certain about that? Did you disable or fiddle the costs of some of the operations (see the manual) in order to determine that this is the case? (Just because you have an index somewhere doesn't mean it's optimal to use it. If you need to read half of a table and hit nearly every disk page while doing so, for instance, it's almost always faster to read the entire table and filter invalid rows in memory.) –  Denis de Bernardy Oct 19 '13 at 11:22
    
@Denis Usually it happens e.g. in DB2 that since finding the optimal plan takes a lot of time..therefore the database engine decides to use a suboptimal plan...i think it must be the case with postgres also. If it is then how can i fiddle with postgres such that it chooses the optimal plan. –  Alice Everett Oct 19 '13 at 11:28
    
The only way to really determine the best plan is to execute them all, which might be too costly. –  wildplasser Oct 19 '13 at 11:42
    
Still, per my answer and prior comment, be very wary of messing around with this kind of stuff unless you know precisely why Postgres is picking a plan rather than another that you think is more sound. Almost always, Postgres is actually correct and the user seeking to force a plan is very, very wrong. –  Denis de Bernardy Oct 19 '13 at 11:43

1 Answer 1

For the time taken to prepare a plan and the time taken to execute it, you can use explain (which merely finds a plan) vs explain analyze (which actually runs it) with \timing turned on:

test=# explain select * from test where val = 1 order by id limit 10;
                                   QUERY PLAN                                   
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.00..4.35 rows=10 width=8)
   ->  Index Scan using test_pkey on test  (cost=0.00..343.25 rows=789 width=8)
         Filter: (val = 1)
(3 rows)

Time: 0.759 ms
test=# explain analyze select * from test where val = 1 order by id limit 10;
                                                        QUERY PLAN                                                         
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.00..4.35 rows=10 width=8) (actual time=0.122..0.170 rows=10 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using test_pkey on test  (cost=0.00..343.25 rows=789 width=8) (actual time=0.121..0.165 rows=10 loops=1)
         Filter: (val = 1)
         Rows Removed by Filter: 67
 Total runtime: 0.204 ms
(5 rows)

Time: 1.019 ms

Note that there is a tiny overhead in both commands to actually output the plan.

Usually it happens e.g. in DB2 that since finding the optimal plan takes a lot of time..therefore the database engine decides to use a suboptimal plan...i think it must be the case with postgres also.

In Postgres, this only occurs if your query is gory enough that it cannot reasonably do an exhaustive search. When you reach the relevant thresholds (which are high, if your use-cases are typical), the planner uses the genetic query optimizer:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/geqo-pg-intro.html

If it is then how can i fiddle with postgres such that it chooses the optimal plan.

In more general use cases, there are many things that you can fiddle, but be very wary of messing around with them (apart, perhaps, from collecting a bit more statistics on a select few columns using ALTER TABLE SET STATISTICS):

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/runtime-config-query.html

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Thanks a lot for the replying. The reply is indeed very useful but is it feasible to force postgres to adopt the most optimal query optimizer(if there is any) rather than the genetic query optimizer(as it uses randomized choices so for bad queries it may not be optimal). –  Alice Everett Oct 19 '13 at 11:57
1  
@AliceEverett : 1) Don't write bad queries. 2) first find a badly performing query plan, then start optimising it. 3) given a reasonable data model + reasonable tuning + valid statistics, it is very hard to get a bad query plan. If you encounter one, try to find the cause. (in most cases the cause will be the data model, and not the optimiser) –  wildplasser Oct 19 '13 at 12:04
    
@wildplasser I understand. But my concern is even if I have a bad query..I want the postgres to optimize it in the best possible manner..even if generation of best query plan takes 2 days for postgres (as is the case with db2. In db2 we can set optimal value which takes even 5 days to generate an optimal plan)..I am not able to find if it is possible to do so in postgres (just like i can do so in db2). Thanks a lot for the reply. It was very helpful for me. –  Alice Everett Oct 19 '13 at 12:31
1  
"is it feasible to force postgres to adopt the most optimal query optimizer." Unless Geqo kicks in, it'll do an exhaustive search and yield the optimal plan already. No ifs nor buts -- it is optimal. When a user shows up in the pg-performance list arguing that Postgres should use this or that index or join method, it turns out that this user is almost always wrong. Exceptions include insufficient amounts of stats being collected (see the note in my answer), and planner bugs which invariably get fixed by Tom Lane et al in a follow-up release. –  Denis de Bernardy Oct 19 '13 at 12:34
    
In the (approx) five years I used Postgres, I've never seen the optimiser run out of time, or stalling. If it would happen, I'd notice it, and solve it. Very bad queries (like those ugly beasts that are generated by frameworks) will work as expected. Don't be afraid of things that could happen. Instead improve your code or datamodel or framework. WRT DB2: Ingres used to have a tracepoint (set JOINOP_NOTIMEOUT, IIRC) to avoid the optimiser take more time than the (expected) query.) But today, CPU time is extremely cheap. (and disk I/O is still expensive, and I/O latency never changed) –  wildplasser Oct 19 '13 at 12:41

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