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I want to sort my objects in descending order using comparator.

class Person {
 private int age;
}

Here I want to sort a array of Person objects.

How can I do this?

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closed as off-topic by Duncan, Cruncher, Richard Tingle, Zong Zheng Li, Andrew Medico Dec 18 '13 at 15:40

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7  
what have you tried so far ? –  pgras Dec 22 '09 at 14:32
    
I edited your question lowercasing the class keyword. –  Bozho Dec 22 '09 at 14:32

7 Answers 7

For whats its worth here is my standard answer. The only thing new here is that is uses the Collections.reverseOrder(). Plus it puts all suggestions into one example:

/*
**  Use the Collections API to sort a List for you.
**
**  When your class has a "natural" sort order you can implement
**  the Comparable interface.
**
**  You can use an alternate sort order when you implement
**  a Comparator for your class.
*/
import java.util.*;

public class Person implements Comparable<Person>
{
    String name;
    int age;

    public Person(String name, int age)
    {
       	this.name = name;
       	this.age = age;
    }

    public String getName()
    {
    	return name;
    }

    public int getAge()
    {
    	return age;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
    	return name + " : " + age;
    }

    /*
    **  Implement the natural order for this class
    */
    public int compareTo(Person p)
    {
    	return getName().compareTo(p.getName());
    }

    static class AgeComparator implements Comparator<Person>
    {
    	public int compare(Person p1, Person p2)
    	{
    		int age1 = p1.getAge();
    		int age2 = p2.getAge();

    		if (age1 == age2)
    			return 0;
    		else if (age1 > age2)
    			return 1;
    		else
    			return -1;
    	}
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
    	List<Person> people = new ArrayList<Person>();
    	people.add( new Person("Homer", 38) );
    	people.add( new Person("Marge", 35) );
    	people.add( new Person("Bart", 15) );
    	people.add( new Person("Lisa", 13) );

    	// Sort by natural order

    	Collections.sort(people);
    	System.out.println("Sort by Natural order");
    	System.out.println("\t" + people);

    	// Sort by reverse natural order

    	Collections.sort(people, Collections.reverseOrder());
    	System.out.println("Sort by reverse natural order");
    	System.out.println("\t" + people);

    	//  Use a Comparator to sort by age

    	Collections.sort(people, new Person.AgeComparator());
    	System.out.println("Sort using Age Comparator");
    	System.out.println("\t" + people);

    	//  Use a Comparator to sort by descending age

    	Collections.sort(people,
    		Collections.reverseOrder(new Person.AgeComparator()));
    	System.out.println("Sort using Reverse Age Comparator");
    	System.out.println("\t" + people);
    }
}
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this actually worked for me , and it's also a very easy solution (just one line) . –  android developer Dec 24 '12 at 9:59
    
Perfect example! Thanks. –  Michael Wildermuth Mar 27 '13 at 0:00
    
Is there a way to sort Strings in a TreeSet using a comparator like this? Same thing, People by age. –  Zeff520 May 13 '13 at 14:00
    
I've never used a TreeSet, but the API documentation says - The elements are ordered using their natural ordering, or by a Comparator provided at set creation time, depending on which constructor is used, so I would guess it is possible. –  camickr May 13 '13 at 15:13

You can do the descending sort this way,

Collections.sort(unsortedList,new Comparator<Person>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Person a, Person b) {
     return b.getName().compareTo(a.getName());
    }
 });

Or by using Collection.reverse() to sort descending as user @Prince suggested in the comments.

And you can do the ascending sort like this,

Collections.sort(unsortedList,new Comparator<Person>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Person a, Person b) {
     return a.getName().compareTo(b.getName());
    }
 });
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7  
Or you can just use Collections.reverseOrder(...) for descending sort. –  Prince Feb 17 '14 at 21:40
    
@Prince Not a fan of that approach, it forces me to look at the original method to see how things are sorted to begin with (un-reversed.) –  b1nary.atr0phy Aug 6 at 3:21
String[] s = {"a", "x", "y"};
Arrays.sort(s, new Comparator<String>() {

    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
    	return o2.compareTo(o1);
    }
});
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(s));

-> [y, x, a]

Now you have to implement the Comparator for your Person class. Something like (for ascending order): compare(Person a, Person b) = a.id < b.id ? -1 : (a.id == b.id) ? 0 : 1 or Integer.valueOf(a.id).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(b.id)).

To minimize confusion you should implement an ascending Comparator and convert it to a descending one with a wrapper (like this) new ReverseComparator<Person>(new PersonComparator()).

share|improve this answer
    
Now that's a bit confusing example, because String implements Comparable. And that -1 there isn't the most straighforward thing. –  Bozho Dec 22 '09 at 14:42
1  
The best argument against -1 * x is that -1 * Integer.MIN_VALUE == Integer.MIN_VALUE. Which is not what you want. I swapped the arguments that's easier anyway. –  Thomas Jung Dec 22 '09 at 14:56
    
And I guess it's a ReverseComparator, instead of Reserve... –  Adriaan Koster Dec 22 '09 at 15:02
    
well, that wasn't THE best argument. It was just confusing for beginners :) It still is, because it would require him to know what Comparable is, and realize that his Person doesn't implement it. But then - thinking IS a good thing :) –  Bozho Dec 22 '09 at 15:06

I would create a comparator for the person class that can be parametrized with a certain sorting behaviour. Here I can set the sorting order but it can be modified to allow sorting for other person attributes as well.

public class PersonComparator implements Comparator<Person> {

  public enum SortOrder {ASCENDING, DESCENDING}

  private SortOrder sortOrder;

  public PersonComparator(SortOrder sortOrder) {
    this.sortOrder = sortOrder;
  }

  @Override
  public int compare(Person person1, Person person2) {
    Integer age1 = person1.getAge();
    Integer age2 = person2.getAge();
    int compare = Math.signum(age1.compareTo(age2));

    if (sortOrder == ASCENDING) {
      return compare;
    } else {
      return compare * (-1);
    }
  }
}

(hope it compiles now, I have no IDE or JDK at hand, coded 'blind')

Edit

Thanks to Thomas, edited the code. I wouldn't say that the usage of Math.signum is good, performant, effective, but I'd like to keep it as a reminder, that the compareTo method can return any integer and multiplying by (-1) will fail if the implementation returns Integer.MIN_INTEGER... And I removed the setter because it's cheap enough to construct a new PersonComparator just when it's needed.

But I keep the boxing because it shows that I rely on an existing Comparable implementation. Could have done something like Comparable<Integer> age1 = new Integer(person1.getAge()); but that looked too ugly. The idea was to show a pattern which could easily be adapted to other Person attributes, like name, birthday as Date and so on.

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2  
Once upon a time there was a good habit to leave a comment to help the just downvoted author to improve his message. –  Andreas_D Dec 22 '09 at 16:12
    
I did not downvote, but compare * (-1) is prone to overflow. I did the same mistake in my initial post. –  Thomas Jung Dec 22 '09 at 16:14
    
And the SortOrder should be set in the constructor and be final. Using a wrapper is an better approach I suppose: new Reverse(new PersonComparator()) –  Thomas Jung Dec 22 '09 at 16:17
    
And Integer age1 = ...; has the boxing overhead. –  Thomas Jung Dec 22 '09 at 16:18
    
Yes, yes, yes, enough room for improvement. Boxing was on purpose and the setter allows to use the comparator for ascending and descending ordering - on the other hand, you're right, better create a new one each time then reusing the same. Constructing is cheap enough. –  Andreas_D Dec 22 '09 at 21:31

Using Google Collections:

class Person {
 private int age;

 public static Function<Person, Integer> GET_AGE =
  new Function<Person, Integer> {
   public Integer apply(Person p) { return p.age; }
  };

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
 ArrayList<Person> people;
 // Populate the list...

 Collections.sort(people, Ordering.natural().onResultOf(Person.GET_AGE).reverse());
}
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2  
Overshooting with style :) –  Esko Dec 22 '09 at 22:08
package com.test;

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Person implements Comparable {

private int age;

private Person(int age) {
	super();
	this.age = age;
}

public int getAge() {
	return age;
}

public void setAge(int age) {
	this.age = age;
}

@Override
public int compareTo(Object o) {
	Person other = (Person)o;
	if (this == other)
		return 0;
	if (this.age < other.age) return 1;
	else if (this.age == other.age) return 0;
	else return -1;

}

public static void main(String[] args) {

	Person[] arr = new Person[4];
	arr[0] = new Person(50);
	arr[1] = new Person(20);
	arr[2] = new Person(10);
	arr[3] = new Person(90);

	Arrays.sort(arr);

	for (int i=0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
		System.out.println(arr[i].age);
	}
}

}

Here is one way of doing it.

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The java.util.Collections class has a sort method that takes a list and a custom Comparator. You can define your own Comparator to sort your Person object however you like.

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