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I was given a question and was asked to give the output.

int main(void){  
    int x = 2;  
    switch(x){  
        case 1,2,1: printf("Case 1 is executed");  
            break;  
        case 2,3,1: printf("Case 2 is executed");  
            break;  
        default : printf("Default case us executed");  
    }  
    return 0;  
}

The above code gives output as "Case 1 is executed" in Turbo C, But on codeblocks and compile online, it gives a compiler error.

Which one is correct? Is it a compiler error or not? And if not, why does the code run only on Turbo C?

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8  
That looks bizarre. I have a hunch turbo C is probably evaluating those cases first comma operator –  RageD Oct 19 '13 at 14:06
3  
@RageD That wouldn't explain it either: both 1,2,1 and 2,3,1 ordinarily evaluate to the same value, so I would still expect Turbo C to give a compiler error if that is the reason. –  hvd Oct 19 '13 at 14:08
    
@hvd Good point-- in any event, it's still ambiguous. Even in the answers below, it should not be allowed since case enumeration would still provide duplicates. –  RageD Oct 19 '13 at 14:11
    
My compiler is doing exactly what RageD stated. It evaluates only the 1 in 1,2,1 and then complains that it didn't see a colon (:) after that number. –  Jason Enochs Oct 19 '13 at 14:15
    
Testing with Turbo C++ 3.0 shows that it gives a compiler error: imgur.com/KsIy2ja –  hvd Oct 19 '13 at 14:25

6 Answers 6

is it a compiler error or not.

The code is invalid in both languages: the case expression must be a constant expression, and a constant expression can't contain a comma operator. (In C, this is stated explicitly; in C++, you have to unpick the grammar to find that a constant-expression must be a conditional-expression, which can't contain a comma).

Even if you were allowed to use the comma operator here, the switch statement would still be invalid since two cases would both have the same value, 1.

And if not why does the code run only on turbo C.

Because both languages have changed significantly since that prehistoric compiler was last updated. Don't use it if you want to learn variants of C or C++ from this century.

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7  
Agree with @Mike - If you are using Code::Blocks, minGW is a well maintained, open source compiler available for no charge. It would be a better choice than Turbo C. –  ryyker Oct 19 '13 at 14:32
5  
The only variant of C form this century is C11. Not all "modern" compilers even support C99. –  Keith Thompson Oct 19 '13 at 18:16
    
To quote a comment on another turbo-c question: Take the hint, use gcc. –  gerrit Oct 19 '13 at 20:03
    
@KeithThompson: Sorry, I keep forgetting not to be sarcastic when the question is tagged "C". –  Mike Seymour Oct 19 '13 at 23:18
    
Compilers are allowed to implement extensions that don't affect conforming programs, and every compiler does; so the fact that Turbo C allows this shouldn't be considered a slight on Turbo C –  Matt McNabb Nov 11 at 21:18

What does comma operator mean in a switch statement?
It means you have an old compiler

Edit post (to show case range example)

The first two examples (including your original code ) exhibit incorrect switch statement syntax (with explanations). The third code example shows how stacking case labels is done correctly:

In your code, the compiler should have flagged the first comma after case 1,<-- here

#include <ansi_c.h>
int main(void){  
    int x = 2;  
    switch(x)
    {  
        case 1,2,1: printf("Case 1 is executed");  
        break;  //error flagged at first comma, and all comma after in case
        case 2,3,1: printf("Case 2 is executed");  
        break;  
        default : printf("Default case us executed");  
    }  
    return 0;  
}  

And, even modified like this you should also get a duplicate label error:

#include <ansi_c.h>
int main(void){  
    int x = 2;  
    switch(x)
    {  
        case 1:
        case 2:
        case 1: printf("Case 1 is executed"); //duplicate label 1 error. (and others below) 
            break;  
        case 2:
        case 3:
        case 1: printf("Case 2 is executed");  
            break;

        default : printf("Default case us executed");  
    }
    return 0;  
}

This example is perfectly legal (C99, C11) and useful: i.e., there are no duplicate labels, and the syntax complies with correct switch usage by stacking unique labels to handle conditions where case 1: OR case 2: OR case 3: should be handled the same way, (in the same block). And of course the same is true for cases 4, 5 and 6.

#include <ansi_c.h>
int main(void){  
    int x = 2;  
    switch(x)
    {  
        case 1:
        case 2:
        case 3: printf("Case 1,2 or 3 is executed"); //duplicate label 1 error. (and others below) 
            break;  
        case 4:
        case 5:
        case 6: printf("Case 4,5 or 6 is executed");  
            break;
    }
    getchar();
    return 0;  
}

This last example is included just for completeness. It illustrates the case range expression. Although gaining interest among C programmers, it is not yet part of C99 or C11, rather an extension of Sun (a flavor of unix) and GNU C compiler (et al.?):

...
    switch(x)
    {  
            case 'a' ... 'z':  //note: spaces between all characters ('a') and ellipses are required
                    printf("lowercase alpha char detected");
                    break;
            case 'A' ... 'B':
                    printf("uppercase alpha char detected");
                    break;

            default: printf("Default case is executed");  
    }
...

The reason for the ambiguous results you are seeing from one compiler to another is that Turbo C is really really old. The version you are using may not parse and compile the same way a newer compiler would. :)

For an (inexpensive) alternative, I suggest you try minGW. I use it with Code::Blocks, it is very well integrated with that IDE. It is more current, and maintained that way fairly well for an open source compiler. (perhaps better than some commercial compilers)

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Turbo C uses comma operator on switch cases and takes the last value, for example case 1, 2, 3: will be compiled as case 3: case 2, 3, 1 as case 1: hence Turbo C will not give you any error. Where as other compilers will not allow you case 1, 2, 3: kind of statement itself.

But in your case even Turbo c will give error because case statements are something like this case 1, 2, 1: and case 3, 2, 1: which will be complied as case 1: and case 1: hence as per switch case rules you can have only 1 case with a value and you cannot repeat the case

I prefer to use gcc compiler rather Turbo C

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You can not use twice the same 'case' value
This is not correct: case 1: case 2: case 1: printf("Case 1 is executed");
Tried to compile on VS2010 => (error C2196: case value '1' already used)

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No, you can't, but that's not relevant. The code in the question is case 1, 2, 1: (which is illegal because comma operators are not allowed in that context), not case 1: case 2: case 1:. –  Keith Thompson Oct 19 '13 at 18:19

is it a compiler error or not.

It will cause a compilation error (don't know about TURBO C++ but in modern compilers).
This is not the way switch statement works (invalid syntax in c/c++). You cannot reuse a case value in switch statement (see the link given by chris) The way you can do this;

 switch(x){
            case 1: case 2: case 3: printf("Case 1 is executed");
            break;
            default : printf("Default case us execyted"); 
          }
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4  
    
@chris; Oops! I forgot about that. –  haccks Oct 19 '13 at 14:13
4  
@haccks But still you don't answer the question. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 19 '13 at 14:18
2  
@haccks - I am not one of the downvoters, but can you see that your statement It is not a compiler error but it will cause a compilation error could be confusing to a person not yet familiar with debugging lingo? Just offering a possible why –  ryyker Oct 19 '13 at 14:38
1  
@downvoter; It is a very bad practice not to remove downvote after answer being edited (corrected). –  haccks Oct 19 '13 at 15:13

FYI, today one may use the GCC case ranges extension when it is appropriate (which is not often) for similar results (only ranges are supported, not arbitrary lists of values).

case 1 ... 5:
case 'A' ... 'Z':
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