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I need to add the ability to change timezones for North America only. There are a total of six timezones, including Hawaii and Alaska.

I am on the eastern part of the USA, so my timezone is Eastern. When choosing a timezone for my location, I can choose New York, Chicago and a few others. I'm not sure why there are so many different timezones that all resolve to the same offset; unless because of DST.

All I'm basically looking for are these six zones:

  • EST
  • CST
  • MST
  • PST
  • AKST
  • HST

Can someone tell me why there are so many different timezones to choose from that resolve to the same offset?

share|improve this question
    
I would certainly hope that if I chose Chicago as my location, that I did not end up in the Eastern Time Zone as it is in Central. – Schleis Oct 19 '13 at 16:14
    
@Schleis, Hmm.. When did Chicago allow computers into their city?? – NaN Oct 19 '13 at 16:18
1  
The list is based on the IANA Time Zone Database (iana.org/time-zones). – Sergiu Paraschiv Oct 19 '13 at 16:18
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The list of PHP timezones is pulled from the PECL timezone database. The PECL timezone database comes from the "Olson" database, which is maintained by the IANA organization.

On the IANA website, they state the following about their upkeep of the timezone database:

The Time Zone Database (often called tz or zoneinfo) contains code and data that represent the history of local time for many representative locations around the globe. It is updated periodically to reflect changes made by political bodies to time zone boundaries, UTC offsets, and daylight-saving rules. Its management procedure is documented in BCP 175: Procedures for Maintaining the Time Zone Database.

The topic of timezones is further complicated by the fact that not all states use daylight savings (Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, for example do not use daylight savings).

So, what one could conclude from this is that a timezone for a particular City is based on its zone boundaries, its daylight savings time rules, and other political factors. Thus, just because some city happens to be physically in the west does not mean it is guaranteed to be PST, for example.

Furthermore, by manually setting a western region to PST is technically less maintainable than it would be to set its actual country/city timezone identifier, so that way, should their offset change in the future, your application would continue to set the correct time.

share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent answer Kristian! Thank you, that explains all I need to know. I was hoping to get away from having to build a timezone table but based on your answer, it looks like I'll have to do it anyhow. – NaN Oct 19 '13 at 16:28
    
You are most welcome, @NaN – Kristian Oct 19 '13 at 16:29
1  
@NaN - Kristian's answer is spot on. But I don't see how that would lead you to think you need to make a timezone table. You should definitely not do that. Everything you could want to know about the time zones are in the IANA database. – Matt Johnson Oct 19 '13 at 18:48
    
@NaN - You may also find the timezone tag wiki to be useful. Key point being that offsets can change within a single time zone due to daylight saving time. An offset by itself cannot represent a complete time zone. – Matt Johnson Oct 19 '13 at 18:51
    
@MattJohnson, Hey Matt, thanks for the input. What I wanted to do was to store the North America timezones in a table, such as America/NewYork, etc and call them that way. I wasn't planning to calculate the offsets. Am I still incorrect on this? Just to clarify, if I have a client in New York, I want to be able to pull that tz and load it for them. If that customer is in California, then I want to be able to load the America/Pacific tz. – NaN Oct 20 '13 at 2:58

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