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Can anybody explain why the following code doesn't compile, and if there is anyway to write the doubleRequestExecute with the desired behavior (being able to pass in a Callback<Pair<? super A, ? super B>>) function that will actually work?

public class Example {
  public interface Callback<T> {
    void onSuccess(T result);
    void onFailure(Throwable caught);
  }

  public interface Entity {}
  public static class Request<T extends Entity> {
    public void execute(Callback<? super T> callback) {
      /* In real code, get a T somewhere and pass it to onSuccess */
      callback.onSuccess(null);
    }
  }

  public static class Holder<T> {
    public T value;
  }
  public static class Pair<A, B> {
    public Pair(A first, B second) {
      this.first = first;
      this.second = second;
    }
    public final A first;
    public final B second;
  }

  public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
      void doubleRequestExecute(Request<A> request1, Request<B> request2,
      final Callback<Pair<C, D>> callback) {
    final Holder<A> result1 = new Holder<>();
    final Holder<B> result2 = new Holder<>();
    request1.execute(new Callback<A>() {
      @Override public void onSuccess(A result) {
        if (result2.value != null) {
          callback.onSuccess(new Pair<C, D>(result, result2.value));
        } else {
          result1.value = result;
        }
      }
      @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {
        callback.onFailure(caught);
      }
    });
    request2.execute(new Callback<B>() {
      @Override public void onSuccess(B result) {
        if (result1.value != null) {
          callback.onSuccess(new Pair<C, D>(result1.value, result));
        } else {
          result2.value = result;
        }
      }
      @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {
        callback.onFailure(caught);
      }
    });
  }
}

If I simply switch the callback argument to Callback<Pair<A, B>> it works fine, but it is overly restrictive on the callback types that can be used.

Here is the compile error I get when I try to build the above code:

Main.java:27: error: > expected
      public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
                                                          ^
Main.java:27: error: illegal start of type
      public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
                                                           ^
Main.java:27: error: '(' expected
      public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
                                                                  ^
Main.java:27: error: <identifier> expected
      public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
                                                                     ^
Main.java:27: error: <identifier> expected
      public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity, C super A, D super B>
                                                                             ^
5 errors

Example desired use:

doubleRequestExecute(new Request<Entity>(), new Request<Entity>(),
    new Callback<Pair<Object, Object>>() {
      @Override onSuccess(Pair<Object, Object> result) {}
      @Oberride onFailure(Throwable caught) {}
    });

Also note that in the actual code, all the handlers are executed on the same thread, so the obvious ToCToU race condition isn't an issue (for a more general approach, one could create an atomic boolean and simply use compareAndSet to check if the other request has completed).

share|improve this question
1  
Type parameters don't have lower bounds. – Rohit Jain Oct 19 '13 at 19:38
2  
Indeed - only wildcards can use super. See docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-4.html#jls-4.4 – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '13 at 19:42
    
Why is this? I understand that in most cases this wouldn't be useful at all (and could be used very incorrectly since anything can decay to object which is super to everything), but in this case it seems there is a valid use, and it simply isn't possible to do what I want because of an arbitrary language restriction. – DRayX Oct 19 '13 at 20:26
    
I'm curious why this question was down-voted. it seems to me like this is a perfectly reasonable thing to do, and the language doesn't seem to support it (or at least nobody has provided a valid method yet). – DRayX Oct 20 '13 at 2:10

Eureka.

The fact that there is no declaration time variance declarations in Java means that deeply-nested generic types like this cause no end of headaches. The solution is to use a stupid wrapper class to force the inheritance to work.

public static class PairCallback< A, B > implements Callback< Pair< A, B > > {
    private final Callback< Pair< A, B > > cbDelegate;
    public PairCallback( Callback< Pair< A, B > > cbDelegate ) {
        this.cbDelegate = cbDelegate;
    }
    public void onSuccess( A a, B b ) {
        onSuccess( new Pair< A, B >( a, b ) );
    }
    @Override public void onSuccess( Pair< A, B > p ) { cbDelegate.onSuccess( p ); }
    @Override public void onFailure( Throwable caught ) { cbDelegate.onFailure( caught ); }
}
public static < A extends Entity, B extends Entity > void doubleRequestExecute(
    Request< A > reqA, Request< B > reqB,
    final PairCallback< ? super A, ? super B > callback
) {
    final Holder< A > result1 = new Holder< A >();
    final Holder< B > result2 = new Holder< B >();
    reqA.execute(new Callback<A>() {
        @Override public void onSuccess(A result) {
            if (result2.value != null) {
                callback.onSuccess(result, result2.value);
            } else {
                result1.value = result;
            }
        }
        @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {
            callback.onFailure(caught);
        }
    });
    reqB.execute(new Callback<B>() {
        @Override public void onSuccess(B result) {
            if (result1.value != null) {
                callback.onSuccess(result1.value, result);
            } else {
                result2.value = result;
            }
        }
        @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {
            callback.onFailure(caught);
        }
    });
}

private static class Entity1 extends Entity {}
private static class Entity2 extends Entity1 {}
public static void main( String... args ) {
    doubleRequestExecute(
        new Request< Entity >(), new Request< Entity >(),
        new PairCallback< Object, Object >( new Callback< Pair< Object, Object > >() {
            @Override public void onSuccess( Pair< Object, Object> result ) {}
            @Override public void onFailure( Throwable caught ) {}
        } )
    );
    doubleRequestExecute(
        new Request< Entity2 >(), new Request< Entity1 >(),
        new PairCallback< Entity1, Entity >( new Callback< Pair< Entity1, Entity > >() {
            @Override public void onSuccess( Pair< Entity1, Entity > result ) {}
            @Override public void onFailure( Throwable caught ) {}
        } )
    );
}

I'm going to up-vote your question because of how challenging and relevant it is.

share|improve this answer
    
This works only if you use Pair<Object, Object>. Try changing Object to something else in your main, and see if you can compile. As I tried to explain in other comments, I think you and @DRayX are trying to make inheritance behave as you think it should, rather than making it "work". – Flavio Oct 22 '13 at 20:21
    
No, I'm trying to make it work. Because there's no way to put the existential quantifier on the outside of a nested generic type, I'm forcing it not to be nested. I just tried it using Entity in place of one of the Objects, and also created a Entity2 <: Entity1 <: Entity hierarchy and had the first Request<Entity2> but the PairRequest expected Entity1 in its first type argument, and in both cases it compiled. – Judge Mental Oct 22 '13 at 21:06
    
That surprises me much. Can you update your answer with the new code? Just with Entity, no need to go up to Entity1 and Entity2. – Flavio Oct 22 '13 at 21:18
    
I don't see why you're surprised. A <: C, B <: D => PCB<C,D> <: PCB<?sA,?sB>>. It turns out all the generous wildcards in the PairCallback constructor are not needed to make this work, so I've edited this answer to clarify what I'm trying to do. – Judge Mental Oct 22 '13 at 21:52

First attempt

(Does not work, see comments)

Try this way:

public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity>
    void doubleRequestExecute(Request<A> request1, Request<B> request2,
    final Callback<Pair<? super A, ? super B>> callback)
...
callback.onSuccess(new Pair<A, B>(result, result2.value));
...

Second attempt

I think I got it now. Here:

public static <A extends Entity, B extends Entity> void doubleRequestExecute(Request<A> request1, Request<B> request2,
        final Callback<? super Pair<? extends A, ? extends B>> callback) { ... }

Example usage:

private static final class E1 extends Entity { }
private static final class E2 extends Entity { }

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Request<E1> r1 = null;
    Request<E2> r2 = null;
    // This is the callback you try to define in your comment
    Callback<Pair<? extends Entity, ? extends Entity>> cb = null; 
    // This is another option
    Callback<Object> cb2 = null;
    // Further option mentioned in comments
    Callback<Pair<? extends Object, ? extends Object>> cb3 = null;
    doubleRequestExecute(r1, r2, cb);
    doubleRequestExecute(r1, r2, cb2);
    doubleRequestExecute(r1, r2, cb3);
}

Why can't I simply use Callback<Pair<Object, Object>>?

This is the same problem as why List<Integer> is not assignable to List<Number>. Consider this code:

Pair<Integer, Integer> pII = new Pair<Integer, Integer>();
Pair<Object, Object> pOO = pII; // Compile error
pOO.setFirst("Whoa");
Integer i = pII.getFirst();

I understand your Pairs have no setter method, but the definition of Java generics imply that a Pair<A, B> is not assignable to a Pair<Object, Object>, but only to a Pair<? extends Object, ? extends Object>.

I want Callback<Pair<? super A, ? super B>>!

Unfortunately, you can't instantiate a type with that signature in any useful (to you) way. Consider again Lists.

List<List<? super Integer>> l = null; // TODO
l.add(new ArrayList<Integer>());
l.add(new ArrayList<Number>());
l.add(new ArrayList<Objec>());

How do you instantiate l? It is a list of lists composed of something bounded by Integer.

List<List<? super Integer>> l = new ArrayList<List<Integer>>(); // NO
List<List<? super Integer>> l = new ArrayList<List<Number>>();  // NOPE
List<List<? super Integer>> l = new ArrayList<List<Object>>();  // NEITHER
List<List<? super Integer>> l = new ArrayList<List<? super Integer>>();  // OK

Same goes for your callback.

// Only possible declaration
Callback<Pair<? super E1, ? super E2>> cb = new Callback<Pair<? super E1, ? super E2>>() {
...
}

Example use

doubleRequestExecute(new Request<E1>(), new Request<E2>(),
        new Callback<Pair<? extends Object, ? extends Object>>() {
          @Override public void onSuccess(Pair<? extends Object, ? extends Object> result) {}
          @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {}
        });
share|improve this answer
    
That was the first thing I tried, but it falls over really quick. When called, compilation fails with the following error no instance(s) of type variable(s) A,B exist so that argument type <anonymous Callback<Pair<Entity,Entity>>> conforms to formal parameter type Callback<Pair<? super A,? super B>>. If you explicitly do Example.<Entity, Entity>(doubleRequestExecute), it says actual argument <anonymous Callback<Pair<Entity,Entity>>> cannot be converted to Callback<Pair<? super Entity,? super Entity>> by method invocation conversion. – DRayX Oct 19 '13 at 20:18
    
Furthermore, even if it got past that, Pair<A, B> can't be converted to Pair<? super A, ? super B>. The pair need to be created as the actual type that the call back expects (or at lest ? extends Pair<A, B>). – DRayX Oct 19 '13 at 20:20
    
You're right, I made some corrections. Don't ask me to explain why it works though, I can't entirely wrap my head around this. – Flavio Oct 19 '13 at 21:12
    
Unfortunately it still doesn't work, the goal is to get Callback<Pair<? super A, ? super B>. Example, two requests both of type Entity (Entity extends Entity so this is fine) and a handler of Callback<Pair<Object, Object>> (acceptable since Object super A and B (and everything else)). Your second answer is doing something completely different. – DRayX Oct 19 '13 at 23:18
    
I think I am doing what you need: Pair<A, B> is not assignable to Pair<Object, Object>, the same way as List<A> is not assignable to List<Object>, so you can't supply a Callback<Pair<Object, Object>> with Pair<A, B> instances. Answer updated. – Flavio Oct 20 '13 at 7:39

So, you're trying to implement a workflow join. You want to take a pair continuation and turn it into two component continuations. I think there are race conditions in your implementation, but leaving that aside for the moment, let's talk about the types.

If you're dead-set on allowing the component types to have names and be different from A and B, they need to be superclasses thereof (as you are going to get an A and a B back from your respective requests). Which is what you tried in the OP. Assuming C and D can only be Entity, turn the relationships around, and you can get it without using the super keyword where it isn't allowed:

public static < C extends Entity, D extends Entity, A extends C, B extends D > void doubleRequestExecute(
    Request< A > request1, Request< B > request2,
    Callback< Pair< C, D > > callback
) {
    ...
}

For arbitrary C and D see my other answer. However, I think you can go as simply as

public static < A extends Entity, B extends Entity > void doubleRequestExecute(
    Request< A > request1, Request< B > request2,
    Callback< ? super Pair< A, B > > callback
) {
    // change all Cs to As and Ds to Bs in the original code 
}

if you are willing to have calling code that looks like this (which I believe mimics @Flavio's answer):

doubleRequestExecute(
    new Request<Entity>(), new Request<Entity>(),
    new Callback< Pair< ?, ? > >() {
        @Override public void onSuccess(Pair< ?, ? > result) {}
        @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {}
    }
);

You can also do

public static < C, D > void doubleRequestExecute(
    Request< ? extends C > reqA, Request< ? extends D > reqB,
    final Callback< Pair< C, D > > callback
) {
    // change all As to Cs and Bs to Ds in the original code 
}

(it seems Eclipse's Java is OK with the wildcards in the Request parameters not being expressly bounded by Entity) and call it exactly as you wished in the OP:

doubleRequestExecute(
    new Request<Entity>(), new Request<Entity>(),
    new Callback< Pair< Object, Object > >() {
        @Override public void onSuccess(Pair< Object, Object > result) {}
        @Override public void onFailure(Throwable caught) {}
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
As for the thread safety, the actual code is guaranteed that all handlers are executed on the same thread, so there is no race (should have mentioned that). Unfortunately, both solutions aren't adequate. The first, besides not really solving the problem at hand, isn't even possible since the object of type ? super Pair<A, B> can't possibly be instantiated (and it still requires A and B instead of anything super to them). The second solution is close, but C and D don't necessarily need to extend Entity (just the request type parameters), e.g. Callback<Pair<Object, Object>>. – DRayX Oct 19 '13 at 23:15
    
Edited to allow C and D to be any type (for the first suggestion). – Judge Mental Oct 20 '13 at 0:09
    
Unfortunately, you can't use type parameters in type arguments with multiple bounds. It fails to compile with the error a type variable may not be followed by other bound. If you switch Entity and C/D, it fails with a similar error. – DRayX Oct 20 '13 at 2:06
    
Yep. Edit withdrawn. Still thinking about the problem. – Judge Mental Oct 21 '13 at 18:18
    
Ya, it's a tricky one. Even if Entity is an interface (which it actually is in the real code) it doesn't work (I really thought you had it there for a second). I changed the question to reflect that this would be sufficient. – DRayX Oct 21 '13 at 21:29

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