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let's say we have two datasets:

assays:

BHID<-c(127,127,127,127,128)
FROM<-c(950,959,960,961,955)
TO<-c(958,960,961,966,969)
Cu<-c(0.3,0.9,2.5,1.2,0.5)
assays<-data.frame(BHID,FROM,TO,Cu)

and litho

BHID<-c(125,127,127,127)
FROM<-c(940,949,960,962)
TO<-c(949,960,961,969)
ROCK<-c(1,1,2,3)
litho<-data.frame(BHID,FROM,TO,ROCK)

and I want to join the two sets and the results after running the algorithm would be:

BHID  FROM  TO  CU  ROCK
125   940   970  -   1
127   949   950  -   1
127   950   958 0.3  1
127   958   959 -    1
127   959   960 0.9  1
127   960   961 2.5  2
127   961   962 1.2  -
127   962   966 1.2  3
127   966   969 -    3
128   955   962 0.5  -

thanks in advance

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3  
Could you explain what is the relation between input and output? Right now it is not clear. –  zero323 Oct 19 '13 at 22:49
    
In addition What you have tried? Can you detail your algorithm at least? –  agstudy Oct 19 '13 at 22:51
    
@zero323 and I want to join the two sets –  Michele Oct 19 '13 at 22:51
1  
@Michele, look at the output data. It is not a simple merge. There are values which are not present in input. Also if I count correctly there is 9 rows in the input data frames and 10 in the output. –  zero323 Oct 19 '13 at 22:52
1  
I apologize for not being clear, the problem is to join the ASSAYS and LITHO sets. Both share the same column ranges FROM TO and these ranges overlap at certain points. How would you divide these ranges to produce a data set of non-overlapping ranges, while retaining information associated with their original range in this case the associated information are the columns Cu and ROCK –  Sireloko Oct 20 '13 at 10:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Tough one but the code seems to work. The idea is to first expand each row into many, each representing a one-increment from FROM to TO. After merging, identify contiguous rows and un-expand them... Obviously it is not a very efficient approach so it may or may not work if your real data has very large FROM and TO ranges.

library(plyr)
ASSAYS <- adply(assays, 1, with, {
  SEQ <- seq(FROM, TO)
  data.frame(BHID,
             FROM = head(seq(FROM, TO), -1),
             TO   = tail(seq(FROM, TO), -1),
             Cu)
})

LITHO <- adply(litho, 1, with, {
  SEQ <- seq(FROM, TO)
  data.frame(BHID,
             FROM = head(seq(FROM, TO), -1),
             TO   = tail(seq(FROM, TO), -1),
             ROCK)
})

not.as.previous <- function(x) {
  x1 <- head(x, -1)
  x2 <- tail(x, -1)
  c(TRUE, !is.na(x1) & !is.na(x2) & x1 != x2 |
           is.na(x1) & !is.na(x2) |
          !is.na(x1) & is.na(x2))
}

MERGED <- merge(ASSAYS, LITHO, all = TRUE)
MERGED <- transform(MERGED,
  gp.id = cumsum(not.as.previous(BHID) |
                 not.as.previous(Cu)   |
                 not.as.previous(ROCK)))

merged <- ddply(MERGED, "gp.id", function(x) {
  out <- head(x, 1)
  out$TO <- tail(x$TO, 1)
  out
})

merged
#    BHID FROM  TO  Cu ROCK gp.id
# 1   125  940 949  NA    1     1
# 2   127  949 950  NA    1     2
# 3   127  950 958 0.3    1     3
# 4   127  958 959  NA    1     4
# 5   127  959 960 0.9    1     5
# 6   127  960 961 2.5    2     6
# 7   127  961 962 1.2   NA     7
# 8   127  962 966 1.2    3     8
# 9   127  966 969  NA    3     9
# 10  128  955 969 0.5   NA    10

Note that the first row is not exactly the same as in your expected output, but I think mine makes more sense.

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Use merge

merge(assays, litho, all=T)

In essence, all=T is the SQL equivalent for FULL OUTER JOIN. I haven't specified any columns, because in this case merge function will perform the join across the column with same names.

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