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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    printf("%s", (1)["abcd"]+"efg"-'b'+1);
}

Can someone please explain why the output of this code is:

fg

I know (1)["abcd"] points to "bcd" but why +"efg"-'b'+1 is even a valid syntax ?

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1  
Yes, someone can. You're statement "I know (1)["abcd"] points to "bcd" " is not correct. It dereferences to the '1' element (second slot) of the literal string, and as such is the value 'b'. Now do the rest of the math, and realize 'b' - 'b' is 0. –  WhozCraig Oct 19 '13 at 23:16
1  
In short, it's 'b' + "efg" - 'b' + 1. Smells undefined on first addition. –  zch Oct 19 '13 at 23:18
    
@zch I concur. I just did the math; the legality is another issue. –  WhozCraig Oct 19 '13 at 23:20
    
@WhozCraig I know char *p = "abc" +10; is UB (even without de. But char *p="abc"+ 10 - 9; is also UB? I am not sure if subexpression should also be within the bounds. Can't find anything in the C standard. One possibility is the overflow: if the pointer couldn't represent the resulting value subexpression. –  Blue Moon Oct 19 '13 at 23:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There seems to be some confusion about the difference between the other two answers. Here's what happens, step by step:

(1)["abcd"]+"efg"-'b'+1

The first part, (1)["abcd"] takes advantage of the way arrays are processed in C. Let's look at the following:

int a[5] = { 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 };
printf("%d %d\n", a[2], 2[a]);

The output will be 20 20. Why? because the name of an array of int evaluates to its address, and its data type is pointer to int. Referring to an element of the integer array tells C add an offset to the address of the array and evaluate the result as type int. But this means C doesn't care about the order: a[2] is exactly the same as 2[a].

Similarly, since a is the address of the array, a + 1 is the address of the element at the first offset into the array. Of course, that's equivalent to 1 + a.

A string in C is just another, human-friendly, way of representing an array of type char. So (1)["abcd"] is the same as returning the element at the first offset into an array of the characters a, b, c, d, \0 ... which is the character b.

In C, every character has an integral value (generally its ASCII code). The value of b happens to be 98. The remainder of the evaluation, therefore, involves calculations with integers and an array: the character string "efg".

We have the address of the string. We add and subtract 98 (the ASCII value of the character b), and we add 1. The b's cancel each other, so the net result is one more than the address of the first character in the string, which is the address of the character f.

The %s conversion in the printf() tells C to treat the address as the first character in a string, and to print the entire string until it encounters the null character at the end.

So it prints fg, which is the part of the string "efg" that starts at the f.

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1  
C does not mandate ASCII as the character encoding. –  Kerrek SB Oct 19 '13 at 23:53
    
No, it doesn't. Can you find an implementation that does otherwise? –  Adam Liss Oct 19 '13 at 23:53
1  
@AdamLiss: There are C implementatations for systems that use EBCDIC. –  Keith Thompson Oct 20 '13 at 15:12
    
Wow. I wonder if they also have an encoding for Sanskrit. :-) –  Adam Liss Oct 20 '13 at 16:51
I know (1)["abcd"] points to "bcd"

No. (1)["abcd"] is a single char (b).

So (1)["abcd"]+"efg"-'b'+1 is: 'b' + "egf" - 'b' + 1 and if you simplify it, it becomes "efg" + 1. Hence it prints fg.


Note: The above answer explains only the observed behaviour which is not strictly legal as per the C language specification. Here's why.

case 1: 'b' < 0 or 'b' > 4

In this case, the expression (1)["abcd"] + "efg" - 'b' + 1 will lead to undefined behaviour, due to the sub-expression (1)["abcd"] + "efg", which is 'b' + "efg" producing an invalid pointer expression (C11, 6.5.5 Multiplicative operators -- quote below).

On the widely used ASCII character set, 'b' is 98 in decimal; on the not-so-widely used EBCDIC character set, 'b' is 130 in decimal. So the sub-expression (1)["abcd"] + "efg" would cause undefined behaviour on a system using either of these two.

So barring a weird architecture, where 'b' <= 4 and 'b' >= 0, this program would cause undefined behaviour due to how the C language is defined:

C11, 5.1.2.3 Program execution

The semantic descriptions in this International Standard describe the behavior of an abstract machine in which issues of optimization are irrelevant. [...] In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced.

which categorically states that whole standard has been defined based on the abstract machine's behaviour.

So in this case, it does cause undefined behaviour.


case 2: 'b' >= 0 or 'b' <= 4 (This is quite imaginary, but in theory, it's possible).

In this case, the subexpression (1)["abcd"] + "efg" can be valid (and in turn, the whole expression (1)["abcd"] + "efg" - 'b' + 1).

The string literal "efg" consists of 4 chars, which is an array type (of type char[N] in C) and and the C standard guarantees (as quoted above) that the pointer expression evaluating to one-past the end of an array doesn't overflow or cause undefined behaviour.

The following are the possible sub-expressions and they are valid: (1) "efg"+0 (2) "efg"+1 (3) "efg"+2 (4) "efg"+3 and (5) "efg"+4 because C standard states that:

C11, 6.5.5 Multiplicative operators

When an expression that has integer type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integer expression. In other words, if the expression P points to the i-th element of an array object, the expressions (P)+N (equivalently, N+(P)) and (P)-N (where N has the value n) point to, respectively, the i+n-th and i−n-th elements of the array object, provided they exist. Moreover, if the expression P points to the last element of an array object, the expression (P)+1 points one past the last element of the array object, and if the expression Q points one past the last element of an array object, the expression (Q)-1 points to the last element of the array object. If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined. If the result points one past the last element of the array object, it shall not be used as the operand of a unary * operator that is evaluated.

So it's not causing undefined behaviour in this case.

Thanks @zch & @Keith Thompson for digging out the relevant parts of C standard :)

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1  
While it is correct on any implementation that I can imagine to be practical, technically, 'b' + "egf" is undefined if 'b' > 4 (one-past terminating 0). –  zch Oct 19 '13 at 23:36
    
@zch I am not sure about UB on subexpressions (excluding the overflow case). Read my comment above. –  Blue Moon Oct 19 '13 at 23:44
2  
@BlueMoon: Why would subexpressions be exempt from UB?! The operators associate on the left, so 'b' + "egf" is evaluated first, which is indeed a candidate for UB. –  Kerrek SB Oct 19 '13 at 23:46
1  
@AdamLiss, C99 6.5.6/8 "When an expression that has integer type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. (...) If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined." –  zch Oct 19 '13 at 23:54
1  
@BlueMoon: "Since the whole expression can be evaluated at compile time, this may not be UB in practice." -- That's incorrect. There's no such thing as "UB in practice". The behavior is simply and unconditionally undefined (assuming 'b' > 4). If a compiler happens to perform some transformation that produces some particular "expected" result, that's just one of the possible consequences of undefined behavior. –  Keith Thompson Oct 20 '13 at 15:12

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