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I wrote a DLL file that I can inject into another process. Once injected, it is supposed to create a message box. It seems to create an infinite number of messageboxes and my computer crashes. Any ideas? Also, what is the difference between DLLIMPORT and DWORD WINAPI? Should Main be DLLIMPORT or the other?

dllmain.c

/* Replace "dll.h" with the name of your header */
#include "dll.h"
#include <windows.h>

DLLIMPORT void HelloWorld() {
    MessageBox(0,"Hello World from DLL!\n","Hi",MB_ICONINFORMATION);
}

int main() {
    MessageBox(0,"Hello World from DLL!\n","Hi",MB_ICONINFORMATION);
}

DWORD WINAPI Main(LPVOID lpParam) {
    main();
    return S_OK;
}

BOOL WINAPI DllMain(
    HINSTANCE hinstDLL, DWORD fdwReason, LPVOID lpvReserved) {
    switch(fdwReason) {
        case DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH:
        break;

        case DLL_PROCESS_DETACH:
        break;

        case DLL_THREAD_ATTACH:
        DisableThreadLibraryCalls(hinstDLL);
        CreateThread(NULL, 0, &Main, NULL, 0, NULL);
        break;

        case DLL_THREAD_DETACH:
        break;
    }

    return TRUE;
}

dll.h

#ifndef _DLL_H_
#define _DLL_H_

#if BUILDING_DLL
#define DLLIMPORT __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define DLLIMPORT __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

DLLIMPORT void HelloWorld();

#endif
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Maybe CreateThread() in DLL_THREAD_ATTACH causes another thread attach event, which calls DllMain(), thus starting the recursion. That's just my guess. I don't know a whole lot about pure Win32. –  siride Oct 20 '13 at 0:29
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Execute the thread when the DLL is attached to the process not the thread:

...
        case DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH:
        DisableThreadLibraryCalls(hinstDLL);
        CreateThread(NULL, 0, Main, NULL, 0, NULL);
        break;

        case DLL_PROCESS_DETACH:
        break;

        case DLL_THREAD_ATTACH:
        break;

        case DLL_THREAD_DETACH:
        break;
...

and check the callback you pass to CreateThread, it should be Main not &Main, it's already pointer.

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1  
    
@BSH: Why is Main already a pointer? If I understand correctly, Main is a DWORD. Therefore, it is an unsigned integer. –  user2899050 Oct 20 '13 at 2:30
    
@user2899050 Main is a pointer, address, to the function so it's not necessary here to use &Main. I honestly don't know where DWORD came from, but Main isn't DWORD, it's a function pointer. If you refer to the size, The address is 32 bit and DWORD is 32 bit type, but this is not the case on 64 bit systems, DWORD is 32 bit and Main address is 64 bit. –  BSH Oct 20 '13 at 3:09
    
I believe when it comes to taking the address of functions then Main and &Main are equivalent. Taking the address of anything else is a different matter. –  ta.speot.is Oct 20 '13 at 3:10
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