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I have a college project where need to convert an int to a buffer of char. I need to use memcpy but when I copy the values it's not work because the msg_buf still empty. I have some constraints: - I need to use memcpy because my teacher will test my code like memcmp(msg_str, &opcode, 2) == 0).

Here is my code:

int message_to_buffer(struct message_t *msg, char **msg_buf){
    int opcode = htons(msg->opcode);
    int c_type = htons(msg->c_type);
    int result;
    int buffer = sizeof(opcode) + sizeof(c_type);

    switch(msg->c_type){

      case CT_RESULT:

            result = htonl(msg->content.result);
            buffer += sizeof(result);
            *msg_buf = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 12);

            if(msg_buf == NULL)
                return -1;
            memcpy(*msg_buf,&opcode,sizeof(opcode));

            break;

    };

    return buffer;
}

What is wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
Can you be more specific about how it's not working? –  icktoofay Oct 20 '13 at 1:27
    
The value of opcode it's not to be copy to buffer. –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 1:29
    
You should probably edit your comment about it being a college project into the question so people who answer are aware of the constraints. As of right now, all you did was post code and say 'it isn't working.' –  user1508519 Oct 20 '13 at 1:50
    
I try to improve my description. Thanks for help –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 1:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

More specifically, you need to be copying the shorts as shorts, not ints. sizeof(short) != sizeof(int) (usually, depending on the architecture):

int message_to_buffer(struct message_t *msg, char **msg_buf){
    short opcode = htons(msg->opcode);
    short c_type = htons(msg->c_type);
    int result;
    char* buffer = NULL, *buf_start=NULL;
    *msg_buf = NULL;

    switch(msg->c_type){

      case CT_RESULT:

            result = htonl(msg->content.result);
            buffer = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 12);

            if (buffer == NULL)
                return -1;
            buf_start = buffer;
            memcpy(buffer,&opcode,sizeof(opcode)); // sizeof(short) == 2; sizeof(int) == 4
            buffer += sizeof(opcode);
            memcpy(buffer,&c_type,sizeof(c_type)); // sizeof(short) == 2; sizeof(int) == 4
            buffer += sizeof(c_type);
            memcpy(buffer,&result, sizeof(result));
            buffer += sizeof(result);
            *msg_buf = buf_start;
            break;

    };

    return buffer - buf_start;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works! Thank's a lot for help me. –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 2:00

I think your problem may be that you are calling htons() on an int. htons() is meant to be used with values of type short, so you may be losing the upper 16 bits of your msg->opcode and msg->c_type there. Try replacing htons() with htonl() instead.

Also, it looks like you are allocating a 12-byte buffer with malloc(), but only writing 4 bytes into it, leaving the latter 8 bytes of it uninitialized/undefined. Is that intentional?

share|improve this answer
    
I tried with htonl() and the result was the same. I allocating a 12-byte buffer because I need to copy more two int's –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 1:43

Why don't you use itoa function to convert int to char*? So you replace your memcpy with itoa function.

Reference: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/itoa/

[EDIT] If your compiler does not support itoa, you can use sprintf instead.

share|improve this answer
    
itoa is not a standard function –  sukhvir Oct 20 '13 at 1:32
    
Because I need to send that entire struct:<br> struct message_t { short opcode; short c_type; union content_u { struct entry_t *entry; char *key; char **keys; struct data_t *value; int result; } content; }; –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 1:34
    
I don't quite understand. So what will happen if you change memcpy(*msg_buf,&opcode,sizeof(opcode)); to sprintf(*msg_buf,"%d",opcode); ? –  rcs Oct 20 '13 at 1:41
    
If I change memcpy to sprintf it works but I can't use that because it is a college project and the teachers will test the function like memcmp(msg_str, &opcode, 2) == 0. With sprintf it returns false –  Jorge Serrão Oct 20 '13 at 1:47

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