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I have data in csv in the following form:

  1    number     tab    one
  2    number two
  3    number three

Now I want to convert the data to the following form:

  1    number tab one
  2    number two
  3    number three

i.e. I want the first tab to remain as it is..but the second and consecutive tabs to be replaced by spaces. Is it possible to do so using a linux command (like sed, etc). I know I can use sed for substitution but is it possible to make it skip the first tab space and start substitution from the second tab space.

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Looks like you are looking for awk. –  Alexei Levenkov Oct 20 '13 at 6:36
    
What have you tried? You are expected to attempt your own solution first. –  Jim Garrison Oct 20 '13 at 6:36
    
@JimGarrison I tried sed 's/^[ \t]*//' but it does not seem to do the needful –  Alice Everett Oct 20 '13 at 6:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's/\t/ /2g' file
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Using awk, you can do like this.

cat file
1       number  tab     one
2       number two
3       number three

The awk

awk '{$1=$1;sub(/ /,"\t")}1'
1       number tab one
2       number two
3       number three

$1=$1 sets all spaces to default one space.

sub(/ /,"\t") changes first spaces to a tab

1 print everything

PS You can skip first tab using a for loop and going trough all fields, but why make it more complicated then needed when the function are there? Only school work has this type of request.

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cat file
1   number     tab    one
2   number two
3   number three

Try this:

sed 's/\s\+/ /2g' file
1   number tab one
2   number two
3   number three
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Skipping the first tab ain't easy.

But you could reframe the problem this way:

  1. Replace all the tabs with spaces
  2. Replace the first space with tab

This may be a bit lossy, but it's actually negligible, and the outcome is the same:

sed -e 's/    / /g; s/ /      /' < yourfile.txt

To enter TAB characters on the command line you may have to type Ctrl-V TAB.

In older implementations of sed where semicolon doesn't work to separate two commands you can use 2 -e expressions instead:

sed -e 's/    / /g' -e 's/ /      /' < yourfile.txt
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