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I would like to use grep twice:

1) I have 2d array from tsv file, I would like to find row using grep and copy the content of next column.

For example:

File:

red     cat
blue    dog

Code:

open (LIST, "file.tsv");
my @list = <LIST>;
my @grepd = grep /blue/ @list;
print @grepd;

As a result perl prints "blue dog" I would like him to print only "dog"

2) I have list, I would like to find phrase using grep and then copy the object next to it.

For example:

my @list = ('red', 'cat','blue', 'dog');
my @grepd = grep /red/ @list;
print @grepd;

As a result perl prints "red" can I make him to print "cat" instead? Or more generally to print object that is next to query object?

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Part of the complicated and disputed etymology of the word "Perl" is that it derives from a woman's name. So it is more correct to ask "How can I make her to print ''cat'' instead?" –  mob Oct 20 '13 at 7:50
    
@mob: Him -> the script –  F. Hauri Oct 20 '13 at 8:59

3 Answers 3

About the question “can I grep the next element” – let's write a function that does that for us.

First, we loop over all indices except the last. When the element at an index satisfies a condition, we remember the next element. We could write this like:

my @input = ...;
my @output = map  { $input[$_ + 1]                 }  # get the next element
             grep { $input[$_] =~ /some condition/ }  # grep all interesting indices
             0 .. $#input - 1;  # all indices but the last

Or equivalently:

my @input = ...;
my @output;

for my $i (0 .. $#input - 1) {
  push @output, $input[$i + 1] if $input[$i] =~ /some condition/;
}

We now want to abstract this into a function. For that, we will take a callback (or: anonymous function) as first argument. We will then call this function with $_ set to the current element. We have to localize that variable before setting it to avoid polluting any caller of that function:

sub grepnext (&@) {
  my $callback = shift;
  # input is @_
  my @out;
  for my $i (0 .. $#_ - 1) {
    # localize $_ and set it to the current element
    local $_ = $_[$i];
    push @out, $_[$i + 1] if $callback->();
  }
  return @out;
}

We can now do:

my @after_red = grepnext { /red/ } qw(red cat blue dog);

I declared grepnext in a way that allows us to call it like above. This uses a (&@) prototype. Prototypes are an feature that allow us to change the parsing of a function call under certain circumstances. They are very powerful, and should not generally be used. They have nothing to do with named parameters and can't be used for any argument validation. Also, the subroutine must be declared before any calls to it.

Without the prototype, we have to use this form:

my @after_red = grepnext sub{ /red/ }, qw(red cat blue dog);

Either way, @after_red will now correctly contain one element, which is "cat".

share|improve this answer

If I understand your purpose correctly, you can handle this better using hash

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash;
open my $fread, '<', "file.tsv" or die $!;
foreach (<$fread>) {
    push @{$hash{$1}}, $2 if /(\w+)\s+(\w+)/;
}
close $fread;

print @{$hash{'blue'}};
print @{$hash{'red'}};

Output:

dog
cat 

1) Using regex with capturing element $1 instead of grep

open my $fread, '<', "file.tsv" or die $!;
my @list = <$fread>;
my @grepd;
foreach (@list) {
    push @grepd, $1 if /blue\s+(\w+)/;
}
print @grepd;
close $fread;

Output:

dog

2) Using shift

my @list = ('red', 'cat','blue', 'dog');
my @grepd;
while ($_ = shift @list) {
    push @grepd, shift @list if /red/;
}
print @grepd;

Output:

cat
share|improve this answer

Split TSV stream:

perl -ne '
    my @line=split("\t");
    print $line[1] if $line[0] eq "blue"
  ' <<< $'red\tcat\nblue\tdog'
dog

or

perl -E '
    open my $list,"file.tsv";
    my @grepd;
    while (my @line=split "\t",<$list>) {
        push @grepd,$line[1] if $line[0] eq "blue"
    };
    say @grepd;
  '
dog

Grep next element:

perl -E '
    my @list = ("red", "cat","blue", "dog");
    my $print=undef;
    my @grepd=();
    map {
        push @grepd,$_ if $print;
        if (/red/) {
            $print=1;
        } else {
            $print=undef;
        };
    } @list;
    say @grepd; '
cat

or

perl -E '
    my @list = ("red", "cat","blue", "dog");
    my @grepd=();
    foreach my $i (0..$#list) {
        push @grepd, $list[$i+1] if $list[$i]eq"red";
    };
    say @grepd; '
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, you could use =~ in place of eq but a regexp use more resources than a simple equality. –  F. Hauri Oct 21 '13 at 0:01

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