Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a REST web service and I'm wondering if there is any convention on how should information exposed by the service be atomized. So far I've been unable to find a satisfactory solution so now I'm asking to the greatest minds ever found in the Internet :P

For example, let's suppose I want to implement an API to access to some sort of library registry, so we have a resource with path /books. By reading /books/123 we would get, for instance, the XML data below:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<book>
    <title>Visit Catalonia</title>
    <author>J. Hans</author>
    <year>2000</year>
</book>

Imagine the author information were wrong and I wanted to change it thru the web service's API. I come up with two possible options, each one with advantages and drawbacks:

OPTION 1: Issue a HTTP PUT method to /books/123 with the data below:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<book>
    <author>G. Robinson</author>        
</book>

Advantages:

  • It's only necessary to implement 1 resource handler: /books/BOOKID
  • We can modify as many pieces of information as XML tags are defined in the data (e.g.: adding in the code above we would update the book's year too).

Drawbacks:

  • GET method always returns all data about a book; we cannot access just a single piece of information. In this example getting all data is not an issue, but what if /book/123 also had a tag with the book's content itself in order to read it online?

OPTION 2: Issue a HTTP PUT method to /books/123/author sending the data:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<author>G. Robinson</author>

Advantages:

  • Information can be accessed in an arbitrary level of depth: the API client can just download the piece of information he/she needs.

Drawbacks:

  • We can't get or modify several pieces of information with a single HTTP request.
  • Implementation is tough: as many subresources as information fields.

So, summarizing, my question is if there's any commonly accepted convention to expose information in a web service. Of course, in simple web services that manage little amount of data this is not an issue, but what if we are exposing a real world database?

Thank you very much in advance.

share|improve this question
    
I'm confused. What does your PUT request have to do with your question? –  Jonathan W Oct 21 '13 at 2:24
    
It's just an example of accessing to a resource. What I am asking is up to what level of depth information should be sparsed along web resources. Put in other words: is it better to create few resources that retrieve or write big amounts of data or to create many resources that retrieve/write little amounts of data? –  Claudix Oct 21 '13 at 5:28
    
Ah, okay. I don't think there is a good answer. I think you need to optimize based on usage. I have a tendency to start with a larger number of resources with more navigation between them, giving the user the option to pass parameters to compose (i.e., embed) some of the resources inline if that helps with optimization. –  Jonathan W Oct 21 '13 at 5:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remote interfaces (like webservices) are usually coarsely grained. This minimizes network overhead.

Issueing a HTTP PUT to /books/123 with the data

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<book>
    <author>G. Robinson</author>        
</book>

seems to me like the book does not have a <title> and a <year> anymore. Data that you PUT to /books/123 should include all relevant information about the book, even the ones that did not change.

Issuing a HTTP PUT to /books/123/author with data

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<author>G. Robinson</author>

is the kind of finely grained control that you would expect from a local interface, not a remote interface. Use this in addition to the coarsly grained interface if updating the whole book data at once with the coarsly grained interface is prohibitively expensive (e.g. if the book data also contains the full text of the book and you frequently need to update only a single property).

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good point; I didn't consider the local/remote issue. Indeed, option 1 is quite confusing since the absence of other book fields actually breaks the data model. Regarding to option 2, would it be a good idea to define resources /book/ID/info and /book/ID/content? In this situation, getting /book/ID would get/put the whole data, and the other two subresources would get/put their corresponding pieces of information. –  Claudix Oct 20 '13 at 15:39
1  
The other option would be to use PATCH in lieu of PUT for /books/123/. That would make it clear that the client is only sending what it wants to change. –  Jonathan W Oct 21 '13 at 5:51
    
OMG, I have never listened about the PATCH method before... Shame on me! –  Claudix Oct 21 '13 at 15:22

I believe you can have both, depending on the client needs/situation you want to support:

  • GET/POST /books/123 : you get and post (create/update) the complete book properties
  • GET/POST /books/123/author : you get and post (create/update) the author of the book

there is no reason why you couldn't use both options. The clients can follow one or the other depending on the situation they are... Option 1 seems to be more appropriate when creating new book entries, or updating the whole entry... whereas option 2 if you in the client UI allow to update "one property" at a time. So, this may very much depend on the client "intents"/situations you want to support... You should take that into consideration when making your design.

I have just read a nice article on InfoQ that touched some of these points (among other things). Take a look at "don't expose your domain model" and "design your API based on intent" points - http://www.infoq.com/news/2013/10/gotober-do-dont-webapi.

share|improve this answer
    
The article gives some recommendations I didn't think of, so thank you for linking it. However this problem seems to be quite "open" and its solution indeed highly depends on the client's needs. Still not very satisfied :D –  Claudix Oct 20 '13 at 15:29
1  
Indeed, there does not seem to be a "best design" generalization... one needs to try to optimize based on the use cases to be supported. This is however tricky if you do not have a clear client use case and want to support different application, on that case maybe the combination of approaches/options is a good one to go with. But again, there does not seem to be "general guidelines" to do this :p –  emgsilva Oct 21 '13 at 7:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.