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I made a messenger that receives data from a server through a ObjectInputStream. I want to be able to retrieve/send serializable files, while also being able to retrieve/send messages from the user.

I couldn't find a good way to sort between the two (Objects and Messages) without causing conflict with messaging.

I've tried using two streams for the same socket (Data*Stream & Object*Stream), and it seems to establish fine, but when I try sending a message from the server to the client through Data*Stream, I get java.net.SocketException: socket closed on my client. (only happens right when I send the message)

Can someone point me in the right direction to how I would approach retrieving 2 different types of information through a stream? (without taking an easy way out. I don't wanna have to do writeObject("[message]"+input); or any cheap tricks like that.



(EDIT) SOLUTION:

Thanks to janos, he has inspired me to write this code. :') Thanks man

The Input receiver:

protected Object data;

public synchronized Object receivedData() throws ClassNotFoundException,
                                                 IOException {
    data = in.readObject();

    if(!(data instanceof String)) {
        retrieveObject();
        data = "";
        System.out.println("Object");
    }
    return data;
}

And the messaging thread:

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);

private Runnable receiveData;
public void receiveData() {
    receiveData = new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            String input;
            try {
                while((input = (String) receivedData()) != null) {
                    if(input.length() > 1) 
                        System.out.println(input);

                }
            }catch(IOException | ClassNotFoundException e){ e.printStackTrace();}
        }
    };

    pool.execute(receiveData);
}

If you have any improving tips, please let me know and I'll update this code.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create a parent class Message, and sub-classes DataMessage and TextMessage.

When receiving a Message, you can check with instanceof its underlying type, and handle it accordingly.

These *Message classes could wrap any objects you want to pass between client and server in their member variables. The *Message classes would have to be serializable, consequently all member variables must be serializable too.

For example given these Message types:

class Message {}

class TextMessage extends Message {
    String text;
}

class DataMessage extends Message {
    User user;
}

You can handle received messages like:

Message message = (Message) in.readObject();
if (message instanceof TextMessage) {
    // do something with ((TextMessage)message).text
} else if (message instanceof DataMessage) {
    // do something with ((DataMessage)message).user
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you give an example? if i were to send (lets say..) User.java from Server -> Client, the Object sent from Server is User, and the Object retrieved is User. User extends Object, so all I would have to do User user = (User) in.readObject();, but if I were sorting using classes, how would that work? –  Vince Emigh Oct 20 '13 at 9:15
    
@VinceEmigh See my updated post. –  janos Oct 20 '13 at 9:31
    
Might take me a while to test out, but this seems logical. I'll try it out, and update you on if it works. Thanks :) also, thanks for the example, that's what I had in mind –  Vince Emigh Oct 20 '13 at 9:34
    
Instead of using the Serializable classes to sort messages and objects, I just sorted them as they came in. At first, I thought everything that came through would be an Object until you casted it, but I guess not. Thanks for the reminder of 'instanceof', don't use it enough to keep it locked in my mind –  Vince Emigh Oct 21 '13 at 5:49

I want to be able to retrieve/send serializable files, while also being able to retrieve/send messages from the user.

You can do all that with an ObjectInputStream and ObjectOutputStream.

I couldn't find a good way to sort between the two (Objects and Messages) without causing conflict with messaging.

That statement is meaningless until you specify the 'conflict'.

I've tried using two streams for the same socket (Data*Stream & Object*Stream)

  1. You can't do that. Use the same stream for the life of the socket.

  2. You don't need to do that. Anything you can do with a Data*Stream you can do with an Object*Stream, because Data*Stream implements Data*Put and Object*Stream implements Object*Put, and Object*Put extends Data*Put.

and it seems to establish fine, but when I try sending a message from the server to the client through Data*Stream, I get java.net.SocketException: socket closed on my client.

That means you closed the stream and continued to use it. This is caused by your use of two streams. Closing any stream wrapped around a socket input or output stream closes the other stream and the socket. You don't need this.

(only happens right when I send the message)

It only happens when you read from or write to a stream that is already closed.

Can someone point me in the right direction to how I would approach retrieving 2 different types of information through a stream?

Just use the API of Object*Stream.

(without taking an easy way out. I don't wanna have to do writeObject("[message]"+input); or any cheap tricks like that.

I have no idea why you consider that a 'cheap trick'. You need to stop making assumptions and start designing.

share|improve this answer
    
No need to be rude. You repeated yourself quite a bit there, and didn't help me one bit. I didn't encounter any conflict, because the conflict would be obvious. If I sorted that way, then unless I go the extra miles to iron out the bugs, users could manually cause confusion in the system. –  Vince Emigh Oct 20 '13 at 9:23
    
There is no rudeness here, and your attempt to introduce irrelevance of this kind is not appreciated. You appear to have no actual interest in clarifying the 'conflict' you want to avoid. Your claim that this 'doesn't help [you] one bit' is patently false. I've told you that you don't need to use both types of streams; I've provided a rigorous proof of why that is so; and I've also explained why you got the exception you encountered. Plainly you are more interested in arguing than in solving your problem. I'm sorry I bothered. –  EJP Oct 20 '13 at 9:27
    
1. If the 'conflict had nothing to do with the problem' why did you mention it at all? 2. If it was obvious to you that you can't use two streams on the same underlying stream, close one of them, then use the other one without getting an exception, why exactly did you do it? 3. What 'help that isn't there' exactly have I made you search for? 3. The Object*Streams API is the answer to your question. If you're going to complain at the help you're kindly given here, at least make some effort to keep it plausible. –  EJP Oct 20 '13 at 9:41
    
Kindly leave the amateur psychology out of it. java.net.SocketException: socket closed means that you closed it. OK? –  EJP Oct 21 '13 at 0:47
    
EJP, you seem frustrated, how are you mate? No need to take your rage out on stackoverflow... –  Chris Gray Jan 19 '14 at 6:37

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