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I have three vectors

vector<string> usersA = {"a15_afd","a19_afd","a20_afd"}
vector<string> usersB = {"b15_afd","b26_afd","b98_afd"}
vector<string> usersC = {"c94_afd","c92_afd","c99_afd"}

I want to check whether the number after the character a exists in other vectors or not. example: usersA index 0 , is a15_254, i want to check whether 15 exists in the other vectors usersB or usersC.

likewise, i have to check the number after b and c exists in other vectors or not. what i have done so far. is storing the numbers into a specific vector

     vector<string> usersANumber;  // it has the numbers of usersA {"15","19","20"}
     vector<string> usersBNumber;  // it has the numbers of usersB {"15","26","98"}
     vector<string> usersCNumber;  // it has the numbers of usersC {"94","92","99"}

i have three for loops first loop i check if the numbers of usersANumber are there in the other two vectors, second loop i check if the numbers of usersBNumber are there in the other two vectors, third loop i check if the numbers of usersCNumber are there in the other two vectors

I find this not efficient. is there any other way I can do this

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Why do you store numbers as strings? –  Aleph Oct 20 '13 at 10:13
    
this is the requirement. –  meWantToLearn Oct 20 '13 at 10:14
    
C++ have many nice algorithms in the standard library, like for example std::any_of, which looks like it could be used for this. It might not be "efficient" as it loops through all vectors once, but it will be shorter. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 20 '13 at 10:17
    
Do you need to do this for all the elements? –  jrok Oct 20 '13 at 10:17
1  
I suspect std::set and std::set_intersection would probably come in pretty handy for this. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 10:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After storing the numbers into new vectors, you only need to sort those vectors and then search for duplicate items using a binary search algorithm:

vector<string> usersA = { "15", "19", "20" };
vector<string> usersB = { "15", "26", "98" };
vector<string> usersC = { "94", "92", "99" };

sort(usersA.begin(), usersA.end());
sort(usersB.begin(), usersB.end());
sort(usersC.begin(), usersC.end());

searchForDuplicateItems(usersA, usersB);
searchForDuplicateItems(usersA, usersC);
searchForDuplicateItems(usersB, usersC);

Notice that you only need to compare vectors once, i.e, after going through all items of vector usersA to check if they exist in vector usersB, there is no need to go through all items of vector usersB to check if they exist in vector usersA.

The searchForDuplicateItems function implementation is shown below:

void searchForDuplicateItems(vector<string> &v1, vector<string> &v2)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < v1.size(); i++)
    {
        if (vectorContainsItem(v2, v1[i]))
        {
            // duplicate item found
        }
    }
}

And here is the implementation of the vectorContainsItem function, which internally uses a binary search algorithm for efficiency:

bool vectorContainsItem(vector<string> &v, string &item)
{
    int left = 0;
    int right = (int) v.size() - 1;
    int mid = (right + left) / 2;

    while (left <= right)
    {
        mid = (right + left) / 2;
        if (v[mid].compare(item) == 0)
            return true;
        else if (v[mid].compare(item) < 0)
            left = mid + 1;
        else if (v[mid].compare(item) > 0)
            right = mid - 1;
    }

    return false;
}
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