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At the moment a default entry looks something like this:

Oct 12, 2008 9:45:18 AM myClassInfoHere
INFO: MyLogMessageHere

How do I get it to do this?

Oct 12, 2008 9:45:18 AM myClassInfoHere - INFO: MyLogMessageHere

Clarification I'm using java.util.logging

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11  
Is there any reason why you seem to ask questions but accept no answers? It's usually good practice on these sites to reward good answers with feedback in recognition for the time people invest in answering your question. You've got a few very good answers below... (nudge) –  Assad Ebrahim Oct 7 '12 at 5:46
    
@AssadEbrahim OTOH, letting new answers float up to the top is better than having an outdated and low-voted but accepted answer stay on top. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky May 24 at 3:54
    
@AleksandrDubinsky: Might want to look at his profile: not a single answer accepted across 14 questions. –  Assad Ebrahim May 26 at 21:15
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7 Answers 7

Like Obediah Stane said, it's necessary to create your own format method. But I would change a few things:

  • Create a subclass directly derived from Formatter, not from SimpleFormatter. The SimpleFormatter has nothing to add anymore.

  • Be careful with creating a new Date object! You should make sure to represent the date of the LogRecord. When creating a new Date with the default constructor, it will represent the date and time the Formatter processes the LogRecord, not the date that the LogRecord was created.

The following class can be used as formatter in a Handler, which in turn can be added to the Logger. Note that it ignores all class and method information available in the LogRecord.

import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.io.StringWriter;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.logging.Formatter;
import java.util.logging.LogRecord;

public final class LogFormatter extends Formatter {

    private static final String LINE_SEPARATOR = System.getProperty("line.separator");

    @Override
    public String format(LogRecord record) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        sb.append(new Date(record.getMillis()))
            .append(" ")
            .append(record.getLevel().getLocalizedName())
            .append(": ")
            .append(formatMessage(record))
            .append(LINE_SEPARATOR);

        if (record.getThrown() != null) {
            try {
                StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
                PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(sw);
                record.getThrown().printStackTrace(pw);
                pw.close();
                sb.append(sw.toString());
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                // ignore
            }
        }

        return sb.toString();
    }
}
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I tried this - but it gives me the log in XML - what am I doing wrong - stackoverflow.com/questions/16030578/… –  user93353 Apr 16 '13 at 6:59
    
if it turns XML instead of the format you expected - that means the setting in your properties file did not found your formatter class, you can do 2 things: 1. make sure your class is in a package and set the formatter property to that class and package 2. make sure your class has a unique name like "MyFormatter", last: make sure all handlers have the formatter you wanted (java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.formatter=my.package.MyFormatter and also: java.util.logging.FileHandler.formatter=my.package.MyFormatter) –  Shaybc Mar 29 at 10:55
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As of Java 7, java.util.logging.SimpleFormatter supports getting its format from a system property, so adding something like this to the JVM command line will cause it to print on one line:

-Djava.util.logging.SimpleFormatter.format='%1$tY-%1$tm-%1$td %1$tH:%1$tM:%1$tS %4$s %2$s %5$s%6$s%n'
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2  
True as of Java7. There is no mention of this in the Java6 docs. –  jbruni Jun 11 '12 at 22:51
1  
It works in Eclipse after I changed it to use double quotes. –  Salvador Valencia May 21 '13 at 18:26
1  
Also in IDEA, works with double quotes. @jbruni This does not work in Java6. –  Joshua Davis Jul 26 '13 at 15:15
1  
Works with single quotes in Eclipse for me. –  rich Feb 14 at 15:22
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1) Java 7 supports a property with the java.util.Formatter format string syntax.

-Djava.util.logging.SimpleFormatter.format=... 

See here.

2)

I have a library with few java.util.logging related classes. Amongst them, it's SingleLineFormatter. Downloadable jar here.

public class SingleLineFormatter extends Formatter {

  Date dat = new Date();
  private final static String format = "{0,date} {0,time}";
  private MessageFormat formatter;
  private Object args[] = new Object[1];

  // Line separator string.  This is the value of the line.separator
  // property at the moment that the SimpleFormatter was created.
  //private String lineSeparator = (String) java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(
  //        new sun.security.action.GetPropertyAction("line.separator"));
  private String lineSeparator = "\n";

  /**
   * Format the given LogRecord.
   * @param record the log record to be formatted.
   * @return a formatted log record
   */
  public synchronized String format(LogRecord record) {

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    // Minimize memory allocations here.
    dat.setTime(record.getMillis());    
    args[0] = dat;


    // Date and time 
    StringBuffer text = new StringBuffer();
    if (formatter == null) {
      formatter = new MessageFormat(format);
    }
    formatter.format(args, text, null);
    sb.append(text);
    sb.append(" ");


    // Class name 
    if (record.getSourceClassName() != null) {
      sb.append(record.getSourceClassName());
    } else {
      sb.append(record.getLoggerName());
    }

    // Method name 
    if (record.getSourceMethodName() != null) {
      sb.append(" ");
      sb.append(record.getSourceMethodName());
    }
    sb.append(" - "); // lineSeparator



    String message = formatMessage(record);

    // Level
    sb.append(record.getLevel().getLocalizedName());
    sb.append(": ");

    // Indent - the more serious, the more indented.
    //sb.append( String.format("% ""s") );
    int iOffset = (1000 - record.getLevel().intValue()) / 100;
    for( int i = 0; i < iOffset;  i++ ){
      sb.append(" ");
    }


    sb.append(message);
    sb.append(lineSeparator);
    if (record.getThrown() != null) {
      try {
        StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
        PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(sw);
        record.getThrown().printStackTrace(pw);
        pw.close();
        sb.append(sw.toString());
      } catch (Exception ex) {
      }
    }
    return sb.toString();
  }
}
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nicer memory consumption than the other solution. –  Tim Williscroft Sep 23 '11 at 0:36
    
I tried this - but it gives me the log in XML - what am I doing wrong - stackoverflow.com/questions/16030578/… –  user93353 Apr 16 '13 at 6:58
    
if it turns XML instead of the format you expected - that means the setting in your properties file did not found your formatter class, you can do 2 things: 1. make sure your class is in a package and set the formatter property to that class and package 2. make sure your class has a unique name like "MyFormatter", last: make sure all handlers have the formatter you wanted (java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.formatter=my.package.MyFormatter and also: java.util.logging.FileHandler.formatter=my.package.MyFormatter) –  Shaybc Mar 29 at 10:56
    
Thanks for sharing. I shared a Formatter I wrote in response to another question. Its performed alright for me. I like seeing the tricks other developers come up with for making code smaller and faster. –  Ryan Jul 11 at 17:02
    
@ondra-Žižka For what its worth I just sent you a patch on your google code repo. –  Ryan Jul 11 at 17:24
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I've figured out a way that works. You can subclass SimpleFormatter and override the format method

	public String format(LogRecord record) {
		return new java.util.Date() + " " + record.getLevel() + " " + record.getMessage() + "\r\n";
	}

A bit surprised at this API I would have thought that more functionality/flexibility would have been provided out of the box

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Eclipse config

Per screenshot, in Eclipse select "run as" then "Run Configurations..." and add the answer from Trevor Robinson with double quotes instead of quotes. If you miss the double quotes you'll get "could not find or load main class" errors.

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1  
As per the previous answer, this works in Java 7. Java 6 doesn't have this feature. –  Joshua Davis Jul 26 '13 at 15:16
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This logging is specific to your application and not a general Java feature. What application(s) are you running?

It might be that this is coming from a specific logging library that you are using within your own code. If so, please post the details of which one you are using.

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It's not some random logger application. It's java's own java.util.logging.Logger –  André Christoffer Andersen Jan 3 at 12:52
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if you're using java.util.logging, then there is a configuration file that is doing this to log contents (unless you're using programmatic configuration). So, your options are
1) run post -processor that removes the line breaks
2) change the log configuration AND remove the line breaks from it. Restart your application (server) and you should be good.

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