Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have 2 classes : ShapeTwoD & Square . Square is derived from ShapeTwoD.

class ShapeTwoD
 { 
   public:virtual int get_x()
          { return x;}

          void set_x(int x)
          {x = x; }

   private:
        int x;
 };


class Square:public ShapeTwoD
{    
    public:
          virtual int get_x()
          { return x+5; }

    private:
           int x;

};

In my main programme

int main()
{
 Square* s = new Square;

s->set_x(2);

cout<<s->get_x()  //output : 1381978708 when i am expecting 2
    <<endl;




ShapeTwoD shape[100];

shape[0] = *s;

cout<<shape->get_x(); //output always changes when i am expecting 2


}

The console output i am getting is very weird.

The first output is 1381978708 though i am expecting it to be 2 .

The second output always changes though i am also expecting it to be 7

I am trying to use virtual functions to resolve to the most derived class method , can someone explain to me what is happening ???

share|improve this question
    
The behaviour seems fairly straightforward; you have two x member variables; set_x is modifying the base-class one (actually it isn't, x=x does nothing!), get_x is returning the (uninitialized) derived-class one. – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 20 '13 at 11:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Take a look at the comments in the code:

class ShapeTwoD
{ 
public:
    virtual int get_x()
    {
        return x; // outputs ShapeTwoD::x
    }

    void set_x(int x)
    {
        // x = x;   // sets x to x
        this->x = x // sets ShapeTwoD::x
    }

   private:
        int x;
 };


class Square:public ShapeTwoD
{    
public:
    virtual int get_x()
    {
        return x + 5; // Outputs Square::x
    }

private:
    int x;
};

int main()
{
    Square* s = new Square;

    s->set_x(2);

    cout<<s->get_x()  //output : 1381978708 when i am expecting 2
        <<endl;       // because Square::x is uninitialized

    ShapeTwoD shape[100];

    shape[0] = *s; // slices Square to ShapeTwoD

    cout<<shape->get_x(); //output always changes when i am expecting 2
                          // look at the comments to the set_x function
}

So, because x is declared as private in the ShapeTwoD, Square can't get access to it. You have to do:

  1. Make x protected in ShapeTwoD
  2. Remove x from Square
  3. Change x = x in set_x to this->x = x (or rename member variable, say, to _x)
share|improve this answer

It's because each class have separate x members. So when you call s->set_x(2) you're setting it in the ShapeTwoD part of the object, while Square::get_x fetches the one from the Square part of the object.

Remove the member variable from the Square class, and make the member variable in ShapeTwoD protected.

share|improve this answer

You don't need a second x which hides the base class' x in the derived class' virtual methods, just use

class Square:public ShapeTwoD
{    
public:
      virtual int get_x()
      { return x+5; }
};

In your original code, Square::get_x() referred to Square::x while the setter from ShapeTwoD was setting ShapeTwoD::x.

Also, the setter itself is wrong, you want:

void set_x(int x)
{
    this->x = x;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.