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I am trying to make a class which should inherit the constructors from other classes but without inheriting from those classes itself.

At one point during the initialization of my class, I want to use perfect forwarding to create an object of the type whose constructor matched the given arguments.

Except for the default constructor with no arguments, there shall be no ambiguities.

This is my code:

#include <string>

using namespace std;

//NOTE: this class is just an example to demonstrate the problem
class String {
    public:
        //default constructor to prevent ambiguity
        String() {}

        //construct from wstring
        template<typename... Args>
        String(enable_if<is_constructible<wstring, Args...>::value, Args>::type&&... args) : ws(forward<Args>(args)...) {}

        //construct from string
        template<typename... Args>
        String(enable_if<is_constructible<string, Args...>::value, Args>::type&&... args) : s(forward<Args>(args)...) {}
    private:
        string s;
        wstring ws;
};

void foo(const String& string) {
}

int main()
{
    foo(L"123");
    foo("123");
    return 0;
}

I tried many things but I just can't get it to work.

  • In the current approach enable_if fails to automatically deduct the template args (I think)
  • Since I use the constructor I can't use enable_if on the return value
  • Adding another default parameter for enable_if won't work because the constructor is variadic
  • When I remove enable_if from the function arguments the compiler complains about invalid overloads (of course)

Is there an elegant way to solve this problem?

Edit: The one implicit conversion that is allowed by the standard should not occur in my class. [example code edited]

One solution that works with the example above would be to define a single variadic constructor and perfect forward the arguments to a conditioned initialization function. However, I would like to avoid this overhead because members need to be default constructed and this may not work in other cases.

(Feel free to edit the question if things can be made clearer)

share|improve this question
    
Good question and I don't have an answer. FWIW, without variadic templates it works by using defaulted parameters. –  Daniel Frey Oct 20 '13 at 13:22
    
I asked near related question also in: stackoverflow.com/questions/18700072/…. One answer was also to use specialization instead :-) –  Klaus Oct 20 '13 at 13:25
    
As I said in a comment to Klaus' solution: Only one user-defined conversion is performed implicitly. Either from the string literal to std::basic_string or from a std::basic_string to your String type, but not both. –  dyp Oct 20 '13 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The standard way to make templated constructors viable only for certain types is to employ defaulted template arguments, like so:

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

struct Foo
{
    Bar x;

    template <typename ...Args,
              typename = std::enable_if_t<std::is_constructible<Bar, Args...>::value>>
    Foo(Args &&... args)
    : x(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
    { }
};

(Here enable_if_t<T> is an alias for typename enable_if<T>::type, which is part of the library in C++14.)


A different, unrelated problem is that of picking different constructor actions depending on the arguments. This problem can be solved by introducing private, different overloads, and then making the public constructor dispatch to those private versions (see DyP's solution, which I can elaborate on if you like). However, you still need to SFINAE-control your public constructor to allow only those which would match any one private version. In your case:

template <typename ...Args,
          typename = std::enable_if_t<
              std::is_constructible<std::string, Args...>::value> ||
              std::is_constructible<std::wstring, Args...>::value>>
String(Args &&... args)
: String({}, std::forward<Args>(args)...)
//       ^^^
{ }

Now we just need to make up an arbitrary family of default-constructible types for the first private argument:

class String
{
    std::string s;
    std::wstring ws;

    template <int> struct X {};

    template <typename ...Args,
              typename = std::enable_if_t<
                  std::is_constructible<std::string, Args...>::value>>
    String(X<1>, Args &&... args) : s(std::forward<Args>(args)...), ws() { }
 //        ^^^^^

    template <typename ...Args,
              typename = std::enable_if_t<
                  std::is_constructible<std::wstring, Args...>::value>>
    String(X<2>, Args &&... args) : s(), ws(std::forward<Args>(args)...) { }
 //        ^^^^^

public:
 // as above
};
share|improve this answer
    
This will give me 'xxx cannot be overloaded' errors as soon as i have multiple constructors like that –  user1492625 Oct 20 '13 at 12:52
    
@DyP: Strange though that you'd even have two viable template overloads in the first place - you'd think that one would always be removed because of the substitution error? –  Kerrek SB Oct 20 '13 at 13:25
    
@DyP: Oh wait, never mind -- you cannot even define the two templates in the first place, I see. Mind if I steal your answer? –  Kerrek SB Oct 20 '13 at 13:27
    
@DyP: Actually, that defeats the point of having enable_if to a degree: Your public "anything-goes" constructor makes String constructible from anything, although it isn't. The public constructor needs to be qualified with an if_any_of_is_constructible_from<string, wstring, Args...>. –  Kerrek SB Oct 20 '13 at 13:30
1  
@DyP: I'd say it's more than pure documentation. It's for honesty and hygiene reasons, so that the is_constructible trait doesn't lie about your class. The trait would rapidly become pointless if it says true to every user-defined class. –  Kerrek SB Oct 20 '13 at 13:44

I can't understand the problem and also the solution. If I want to use 2 different types for a method or a constructor I can simply write both types. There is no need to have a template with SFINAE for that reason! This can simply done by specialization.

class A 
{
    public:
    template <typename ... Args>
    A(const wstring &, Args ... );

    template <typename ... Args>
    A(const string &, Args ...);
};

To have a template which exact match for only one type is not really semantically a template :-)

After reading your comment I got this solution:

class foo
{
    public:
        template <typename ... Args>
        foo( const string &&x, Args ... ) { cout << "Using string" << endl; }

        template <typename ... Args>
        foo( const wstring &&x, Args ...) { cout << "Using wstring" << endl; }
};

int main()
{
    foo("123");
    foo(L"123");

    foo("123", 1);
    foo(L"123", 1.11);
    return 0;
}

and this return as expected:

Using string
Using wstring
Using string
Using wstring
share|improve this answer
    
True. This actually works in my current case and not noticing that is a little embarrassing. The only problem is that it may use one implicit conversion which I guess was trying to avoid. –  user1492625 Oct 20 '13 at 12:57
    
An implicit conversion should only take place if the parameter did not match exactly. As I understand your example you have 2 explicit defined types. And in addition, if you could specify your types with a enable_if you have a different effect: If your given type did not match exactly you will have no instantiations of any of the templates which results in an compile error. –  Klaus Oct 20 '13 at 13:12
    
There's an implicit conversion from the supplied string literals to the parameter type (either wstring or string). By the way, this is an example where a by-value sink argument (instead of by-const-ref) is more performant, if you don't provide rvalue-ref overloads additionally. –  dyp Oct 20 '13 at 13:20
    
You are absolutely right! The given types should match exactly but did not in my given example. BTW: It should also be possible to catch rvalue reference types. –  Klaus Oct 20 '13 at 13:23
    
Actually after checking, it does not work in my real case which is a little bit different from the given example. I should think more before writing. What I ultimately trying to achieve is to have a void foo(const String& string); function that i can call like foo("123"); and foo(L"123); instead of foo(string("123")) and foo(wstring(L"123"); Basically, this is synthetic sugar for a framework i am writing. –  user1492625 Oct 20 '13 at 13:24

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