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In class I have this :

public class CustomerMvc 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "LastName mandatory.")]
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    [EmailValidation(ErrorMessage = "Email not valid.")]
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

In another class, I have this :

public class CartMvc
{
    public CustomerMvc Customer { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "VAT mandatory.")]
    public int VatId { get; set; }
}

A Save method int the controller, receive a model type CartMvc. The problem is, in this case, I don't want validate the property type CustomerMvc but only VatId.

Is there a way to bypass, in this case, the validation on CustomerMvc ? Other way ?

Thanks,

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use a view model:

public class SaveCustomerMvcViewModel
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public string Email { get; set; }
}

and then:

public class SaveCartMvcViewModel
{
    public SaveCustomerMvcViewModel Customer { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "VAT mandatory.")]
    public int VatId { get; set; }
}

Now of course your Save controller action will take the appropriate view model as parameter:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Save(SaveCartMvcViewModel model)
{
    ...
}

And as a side remark, putting the [Required] attribute on a non-nullable integer property (your VatId property) hardly makes any sense because a non-nullable integer will always have a value. If you want to validate that the user actually entered some value you'd better use a nullable integer on your view model:

public class SaveCartMvcViewModel
{
    public SaveCustomerMvcViewModel Customer { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "VAT mandatory.")]
    public int? VatId { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes of course but it's another class. I wanted to avoid duplicate class. In this case the customer doesn't need to be validated. But if no other way ok :) –  Kris-I Oct 20 '13 at 13:17
    
It is not a duplicate, it has a different purpose. it is called View model, whereas other classs is domain model. –  DarthVader Oct 20 '13 at 13:18
    
What do you mean it's in another class? Best practices in ASP.NET MVC dictate that you should have view model for each view. As you can see you have different validation logic between the different actions. So you should have different view models for them. And to ease the mapping between your view models and your domain models I would recommend you AutoMapper. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 20 '13 at 13:18
    
and of course, you can use a mapper to save typing. –  DarthVader Oct 20 '13 at 13:18

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