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I have declared an array char Buffer[100]="01 05 01 4A 63 41"; now the array looks like this

Buffer[0]='0'
Buffer[1]='1'
Buffer[2]=' '
Buffer[3]='0'
Buffer[4]='5'

i just want to convert these value to int `eg.:

  • Buffer[0]='0', Buffer[1]='1' to 0x01 (1)
  • Buffer[0]='0', Buffer[1]='5' to 0x05 (5)
  • ... etc.

atoi()cannot be used since it converts all the Buffer value as integer.

How to convert a particular space delimited value sub-string to an integer?

share|improve this question
3  
What should be space value? –  Alex Farber Oct 20 '13 at 13:30
    
@Alex: It is not clearly stared, but I believe the space is merely a delimiter. It would be useful to know whether all values are two-digit hex values (in which case the space delimiter is redundant perhaps except for human readability). The value 4A also suggests that the values are hexadecimal. The question could do with clarification. –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 15:15
    
atoi() won't work, but not for the reason you suggest. It stops conversion when a non-digit character is found, so it will not convert all of Buffer; however it only convert decimal strings, and the 4A value suggests these values are to be interpreted as hexadecimal. You could do it with strtol(). –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 15:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Consider this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char Buffer[100] = "01 05 01 4A 63 41" ;
    const char* h = &Buffer[0] ;
    int i ;

    while( *h != 0 )
    {
        if( sscanf( h, "%2x", &i  ) == 1 )
        {
            printf( "0x%02X (%d)\n", i, i ) ;
        }

        h += 3 ;
    }

   return 0;
}

The output from which is:

0x01 (1)
0x05 (5)
0x01 (1)
0x4A (74)
0x63 (99)
0x41 (65)

I have assumed that all the values are hexadecimal, all two digits, and all separated by a single space (or rather a single non-hex-difgit character), and that the array is nul terminated. If either of these conditions are not true, the code will need modification. For example if the values may be variable length, then the format specifiers need changing, and, you should increment h until a space or nul is found, and if a space is found, increment once more.

You could write similar code using strtol() instead of sscanf() for conversion, but atoi() is specific to decimal strings, so could not be used.

If you are uncomfortable with the pointer arithmetic, then by array indexing the equivalent is:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char Buffer[100] = "01 05 01 4A 63 41" ;
    int c = 0 ;
    int i ;

    while( *h != 0 )
    {
        if( sscanf( &Buffer[c], "%2x", &i  ) == 1 )
        {
            printf( "0x%02X (%d)\n", i, i ) ;
        }

        c += 3 ;
    }

   return 0;
}

and the strtol() version if you prefer:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    char Buffer[100] = "01 05 01 4A 63 41" ;
    const char* h = &Buffer[0] ;

    while( *h != 0 )
    {
        int i = strtol( h, 0, 16 ) ; 
        printf( "0x%02X (%d)\n", i, i ) ;

        h += 3 ;
    }

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

My first solution works only for integers, and the following one works also for hexadecimal numbers. I wrote down the function which converts string representation of a hexadec. number into a decimal number. Then, as suggested by Jochim Pileborg, I used strtok to parse the given Buffer array.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int hexToInt(char *tok)
{
  int i,out=0, tens=1, digit;
  for(i=strlen(tok)-1; i>=0; i--)
  {
    switch(tok[i])
    {
      case '0':
      case '1':
      case '2':
      case '3':
      case '4':
      case '5':
      case '6':
      case '7':
      case '8':
      case '9': digit=tok[i]-'0';
                break;
      case 'A': digit=10; break;
      case 'B': digit=11; break;
      case 'C': digit=12; break;
      case 'D': digit=13; break;
      case 'E': digit=14; break;
      case 'F': digit=15; break;
    }
    out+=digit*tens;
    tens*=16;
  }
//  printf("hex:%s  int:%d ", tok, out);
  return out;
}

int main()
{
  char Buffer[100]="01 2A 10 15 20 25";
  int intarr[100],current=0;
  char *tok=malloc(20*sizeof(char));
  tok=strtok(Buffer," ");
  while(tok!=NULL)
  {
    intarr[current]=hexToInt(tok);
    current++;
    tok=strtok(NULL," ");
  }
  printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can use the same 'fall-through' technique for 'A' to 'F' as you have for '1' to '9', with digit = tok[i] - 'A'. It may be necessary to allow 'a' to 'f' too. –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 18:59
    
Good notice, thanks! –  Igor Popov Oct 20 '13 at 19:03

You can treat Buffer as a string (which it is), and use e.g. strtok to "tokenize" the numbers on space boundary. Then use strtol to convert each "token" to a number.

But do note that strtok modifies the string, so if you don't want that you have to make a copy of the original Buffer and work on that copy.

Also note that as the numbers seems to be hexadecimal you can't use atoi because that function only parses decimal numbers. You have to use strtol which can handle any base from 2 to 36.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is no need to use strtok() because strtol() conversion will stop when a non-digit character is encountered. You just need to index the array at a step of three characters, or by scanning for the next space delimiter (or nul). –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 19:04
    
@Clifford That is better actually. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 20 '13 at 19:06
1  
strtok_r() also modifies the string, it differs from strtok() in that it does not retain a static pointer to the current position - that is provided by the caller. –  Clifford Oct 21 '13 at 9:13

You can use sscanf for this, e.g.:

int intarr[6];
sscanf(Buffer,"%d %d %d %d %d %d",&intarr[0],&intarr[1],&intarr[2],&intarr[3],&intarr[4],&intarr[5]);
share|improve this answer
    
His values appear to be hex. %x. –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 15:03

You can cast Buffer[i] to int. Then check its value, which will be in ASCII. 48->0 . . 57->9

You can even compare the char to its ASCII value without casting

int CharToDigit(char c)
{
    if(c>=48 && c<=57) // or as suggested if(c>='0' && c <='9')
        return (int)c - 48; // subtract the ascii of 0
    return -1; // not digit
}

For digits from A to F you'll have to subtract 55 from uppercase letters (65-10, 65 is ascii of A)

Then loop through the chars in Buffer sending them to the function: CharToDigit(Buffer[i]) and check the returned int.

share|improve this answer
1  
Inspection of the array suggests that the string is intended to be interpreted as hexadecimal. Moreover it is clearer to use character constants for this, so if c >= '0' && c <= '9' and `return c -'0' ;', then you also need to deal with 'A' to 'F' and possibly 'a' to 'f'. –  Clifford Oct 20 '13 at 18:49
    
Thanks, just edited the answer –  Jerry Oct 20 '13 at 18:59

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