Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to convert the list of Integers in Python into Characters,

Here is what I have done,

S = [55, 58, 5, 13, 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91]

D = ""
for i in S:
    D += chr(i)
D = ''.join(map(str, D))

This wouldn't work because the chr value of 13 is \r , it will return the start of the line and will cause the expulsion of first four values.

The output will be the character values for 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91 only (the first four values will be removed due to \r)

Here is the output,

♫♀▬¶FSZET[P[

So, It cannot be converted back to the original Integer value.

The second approach,

If i do this,

S = [55, 58, 5, 13, 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91]
print(repr( ", ".join(map(str, map(chr, S)))))

It works but it will output,

'7, :, \x05, \r, \x0e, \x0c, \x16, \x14, F, S, Z, E, T, [, P, ['

But, If i convert it back to integer using ord then each character will be converted separately including x , \ etc....

D = repr( ", ".join(map(str, map(chr, S))))
for i in D:
    print(ord(i))

I want to convert the integer to the string and then back to the integers. The final output should be the original integer List which was,

[55, 58, 5, 13, 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91]

How could I acheive this. ?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
import ast

string_version = str(S)
list_version = ast.literal_eval(string_version)

Also, the following works fine:

string_version = ''.join(chr(s) for s in S)
list_verison = list(ord(s) for s in string_version)

The \r does not remove the first four characters, it just makes it print that way to a terminal, and the string isn't very human-readable.

You can abbreviate a bit further if you want:

string_version = ''.join(map(chr, S))
list_version = list(map(ord, string_version))

The \r might cause a problem if you need to print the string_version to a terminal, then copy-paste it and read it back, or something like that. In that case you could do:

string_version = repr(''.join(map(chr, S)))
# print, copy, paste, etc.
list_version = list(map(ord, ast.literal_eval(string_version)))

It's a less readable form than my first code snippet, but it might be more compact.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't work either, print(''.join(chr(s) for s in S)) outputs, ♫♀▬¶FSZET[P[ –  sufiyan Oct 20 '13 at 15:15
    
and string_version = str(S) printing the same list of integers without converting it to string –  sufiyan Oct 20 '13 at 15:16
2  
@Xufyan: Look at the result of print(repr(''.join(chr(s) for s in S))). As I have already said, the four characters are there in the string, but the \r affects how it prints to a terminal. –  Steve Jessop Oct 20 '13 at 15:16
    
@Xufyan: you are mistaken. str(S) is indeed a string. See for yourself by looking at the result of print(type(str(S))). It happens to be the same string that S is converted to by print when you do print(S). –  Steve Jessop Oct 20 '13 at 15:17
    
hello, but if i write "♫♀▬¶FSZET[P[" to a file and then read it from file and convert it then it wont return the original integers –  sufiyan Oct 20 '13 at 16:47

You could use bytearray here:

S = [55, 58, 5, 13, 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91]

as_str = str(bytearray(S))
print list(bytearray(as_str))
# [55, 58, 5, 13, 14, 12, 22, 20, 70, 83, 90, 69, 84, 91, 80, 91]
share|improve this answer

Given a list integers s, you can create the output string d with:

s = [...]
d = "".join(map(chr, [letter for letter in s]))

You can convert the string d back into a list with:

d = "..."
s = map(int, map(ord, list(d)))
share|improve this answer
    
You're right; I didn't realize that. I fixed it. –  coder108 Oct 20 '13 at 15:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.