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When an exception is possible to be thrown in a finally block how to propagate both exceptions - from catch and from finally?

As a possible solution - using an AggregateException:

internal class MyClass
{
    public void Do()
    {
        Exception exception = null;
        try
        {
            //example of an error occured in main logic
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            exception = e;
            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            try
            {
                //example of an error occured in finally
                throw new AccessViolationException();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                if (exception != null)
                    throw new AggregateException(exception, e);
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}

These exceptions can be handled like in following snippet:

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        new MyClass().Do();
    }
    catch (AggregateException e)
    {
        foreach (var innerException in e.InnerExceptions)
            Console.Out.WriteLine("---- Error: {0}", innerException);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("---- Error: {0}", e);
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this question
1  
I can't think of a meaningful scenario where it would be necessary to know both exceptions. Your solution would definitely work, but handling it in the caller would be awfully complex. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 20 '13 at 15:55
    
I think that the re-throw at the end (in the finally catch block) will never be reached, since if an exception occurs the object e is never null. –  pasty Oct 20 '13 at 16:00
4  
If you're catching an exception, you're saying "I know how to fix this" - if it turns out that you don't know how to fix this, then you need to do as little as possible to obscure the error situation. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Oct 20 '13 at 16:01
    
I would like at least display or log these exceptions. –  Sergey Smolnikov Oct 20 '13 at 16:20
    
@SergeySmolnikov if that is all you are doing then you should use the AppDomain.UnhandledException event. –  Scott Chamberlain Oct 20 '13 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As the comments have suggested this may indicate "unfortunately" structured code. For example if you find yourself in this situation often it might indicate that you are trying to do too much within your method. You only want to throw and exception if there is nothing else you can do (your code is 'stuck' with a problem you can't program around. You only want to catch an exception if there is a reasonable expectation you can do something useful. There is an OutOfMemoryException in the framework but you will seldom see people trying to catch it, because for the most part it means you're boned :-)

If the exception in the finally block is a direct result of the exception in the try block, returning that exception just complicates or obscures the real problem, making it harder to resolve. In the rare case where there is a validate reason for returning such as exception then using the AggregateException would be the way to do it. But before taking that approach ask yourself if it's possible to separate the exceptions into separate methods where a single exception can be returned and handled (separately).

share|improve this answer
    
Agree, the design of code should be revised before using such solution. I try to find more save way than to use finally blocks with "try-catch with empty catch block". –  Sergey Smolnikov Oct 20 '13 at 18:39
    
To add to @Dweeberly's answer, typically use the finally block to do any resource cleanup. Well structured code will not attempt to do any recovery or further processing in the finally block. finally is provided as a last ditch effort for your code to have a one last shot before the exception is propagated up the stack. As the adage goes " with great power comes great responsibility", use "finally" wisely –  Abhijeet Patel Oct 20 '13 at 18:50
    
@AbhijeetPatel: It is normal for some kinds of classes to enter into states whose cleanup will require actions that might fail (e.g. one could construct a File class where every write-data method would ensure data was written before returning, but performance would be horrible compared with a class that used deferred writes). Often, failures in finally are more serious than those in try, but there's seldom any nice way to know whether that will be true in any particular situation. –  supercat Dec 13 '13 at 18:16

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