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I am trying to find whether n exists as a sum of any two numbers in the passed array if so return true else false, the problem with my code is that inject is not iterating as I want it to. What am I doing wrong?

def sum_to_n?(array,n)
  array.each do |i|
    array.inject(i) do |memo,var|
      if memo + var == n
        return true
      else
        return false
      end
    end
  end
end

puts sum_to_n?([1,2,3,4,5],9)
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1  
What happens and what do you instead expect to happen? –  Andrew Marshall Oct 20 '13 at 17:04
    
You return false immediately if memo + var != n. This means that unless the first match sums to n, your method always returns false. Also your inject loop doesn't do what you think it does. –  Hunter McMillen Oct 20 '13 at 17:07
    
@AndrewMarshall it is not iterating and i want it modify so that it can iterate –  prabhu Oct 20 '13 at 17:13
    
@HunterMcMillen yes that seems to be the case –  prabhu Oct 20 '13 at 17:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is an approach :

def sum_to_n?(a,n)
  !!a.find{|e| a.include?(n-e)}
end
a = [1,2,3,4,5]
sum_to_n?(a,9) # => true
sum_to_n?(a,11) # => false

If you want to get those 2 elements:

def sum_to_n?(a,n)
  num=a.find{|e| a.include?(n-e)}
  unless num
    puts "not exist"
  else
    p [n-num,num]
  end
end
a = [1,2,3,4,5]
sum_to_n?(a,9)
# >> [5, 4]
sum_to_n?(a,11)
# >> not exist

Logic

Enumerable#find method passing one array element per iteration.Now for any iteration,say I have an element e,and I subtracted it from n. Now I was just testing that (n-e) is present in the source array.If I found a match #find will stop finding,and immediately will return e.If not found,then it will go for next iteration. If #find completes its iteration,but didn't find (n-e),as per the documentation it will return nil.

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Explaining your code seems like it would be useful. –  Hunter McMillen Oct 20 '13 at 17:17
1  
thats concise and spot-on!! –  prabhu Oct 20 '13 at 17:20
    
@HunterMcMillen I explained it as you told.. :) –  Arup Rakshit Oct 20 '13 at 18:04
    
Arup, perhaps add a line at the beginning: (return a.select {|e| e==0}.size > 1) if n == 0 –  Cary Swoveland Oct 21 '13 at 7:23

This question have already be answered but I think this approach is more readable:

def sum_to_n?(a,n)
  a.combination(2).find{|x,y| x+y==n}
end

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
p sum_to_n?(a,9)  # => [4, 5]
p sum_to_n?(a,11) # => nil
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Never one for doing things the easy way:

n = 14
a = [1,3,5,9,13,3,18]
if n==0
  a.select {|x| x == 0}.size > 1
else
  a.map {|x| 2*x - n}.uniq.group_by(&:abs).values.map(&:size).max > 1 # => true
end
  • for n != 0, double values and subtract n => [-12, -8, -4, 4, 12, -8, 22]. We are now looking for pairs that sum to zero.
  • uniq => [-12, -8, -4, 4, 12, 22] in case a has duplicates (the two 3's). Without uniq, we'd be in trouble at the next step.
  • group by absolute value => {12=>[-12, 12], 8=>[-8], 4=>[-4, 4], 22=>[22]}. Hash values of size 2 correspond to pairs that sum to n (1+13 => [-12,-12] and 5+9 => [-4, 4]).
  • select hash values, and map to .size => [2, 1, 2, 1], then see if [2, 1, 2, 1].max > 1.
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