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first comes the idea of the "smart function":

>>> def f(x,check={}):
    if x not in check:
        print 'call f'
        check[x]=2*x
    return check[x]

>>> f(2)
call f
4
>>> f(2)
4
>>> f(3)
call f
6
>>> 

It means,if you give the same arguments,it only computes once.when not first called,it directly return the value.

I think highly of this kind of functions.Because with it,you don't have to define a varible to store value,yet save the computing source.

but this function is too simple and when I want to define another smart function g,I must repeat someting like:

>>> def g(x,check={}):
    if x not in check:
        print 'call g'
        check[x]=x**2
    return check[x]

So,my question comes up,how to define a decorator "lazy" which works like:

@lazy
def func(a,b,*nkw,**kw):
    print 'call func'
    print a,b
    for k in nkw:
        print k
    for (k,v) in kw.items():
        print k,v
    #do something with a,b,*kw,**nkw to get the result
    result=a+b+sum(nkw)+sum(kw.values())
    return result
print '--------1st call--------'
print func(1,2,3,4,5,x=6,y=7)
print '--------2nd call--------'
print func(1,2,3,4,5,x=6,y=7)

the result:

>>> 
--------1st call--------
call func
1 2
3
4
5
y 7
x 6
28
--------2nd call--------
28

note,when no *kw or **nkw,i.e.:func(1,2) is also required to work smart.thanks in advance!

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1  
You'd call this “memoization”. If you look up Python memoization decorators you should get some useful responses. –  Waleed Khan Oct 20 '13 at 17:27
    
@Waleed Khan thanks,I will see it. –  Pythoner Oct 20 '13 at 17:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonDecoratorLibrary#Memoize:

class memoized(object):
   '''Decorator. Caches a function's return value each time it is called.
   If called later with the same arguments, the cached value is returned
   (not reevaluated).
   '''
   def __init__(self, func):
      self.func = func
      self.cache = {}
   def __call__(self, *args):
      if not isinstance(args, collections.Hashable):
         # uncacheable. a list, for instance.
         # better to not cache than blow up.
         return self.func(*args)
      if args in self.cache:
         return self.cache[args]
      else:
         value = self.func(*args)
         self.cache[args] = value
         return value
   def __repr__(self):
      '''Return the function's docstring.'''
      return self.func.__doc__
   def __get__(self, obj, objtype):
      '''Support instance methods.'''
      return functools.partial(self.__call__, obj)
share|improve this answer
    
update,add"import collections,functools",apply your code to my example,and error:TypeError: __call__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'y'.. –  Pythoner Oct 20 '13 at 17:37
    
import collections –  Mauris Oct 20 '13 at 17:38
    
thanks , i find out the correct code in that page ,later I will share that code. –  Pythoner Oct 20 '13 at 17:46

with the help of nooodl,I found out the answer which is exactly I want ,from page https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonDecoratorLibrary#Memoize.

Here to share it:

import collections,functools
def memoize(obj):
    cache = obj.cache = {}
    @functools.wraps(obj)
    def memoizer(*args, **kwargs):
        key = str(args) + str(kwargs)
        if key not in cache:
            cache[key] = obj(*args, **kwargs)
        return cache[key]
    return memoizer

@memoize
def func(a,b,*nkw,**kw):
    print 'call func'
    print a,b
    for k in nkw:
        print k
    for (k,v) in kw.items():
        print k,v
    #do something with a,b,*kw,**nkw to get the result
    result=a+b+sum(nkw)+sum(kw.values())
    return result

print '--------1st call--------'
print func(1,2,3,4,5,x=6,y=7)
print '--------2nd call--------'
print func(1,2,3,4,5,x=6,y=7)
share|improve this answer

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