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I'm trying to return a value from a function but all it return is the value 1.

It's suppose to have 5 arguments in the computeCivIndex(), even if I hard coded the values the output I receive would still be 1.

Why is this so ?

float LocationData::computeCivIndex()
{
     civNum1 = 45.0 / 100;
     civNum2 = 20 + 50;
     civNum3 = civNum2 / 200;
     civNum4 = civNum1 - civNum3;
     civNum5 = 5 + 10;


    return civNum;
}

//display data
void LocationData::displaydata()
{
cout << "CIV value: " << computeCivIndex << endl;
}
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civNum is uninitialized. –  l19 Oct 20 '13 at 17:31
    
But you're returning civNum, not any of the values inside the function... –  0x499602D2 Oct 20 '13 at 17:31
    
What is civNum and how is it modified in computeCivIndex()? Add relevant code. –  Kunal Oct 20 '13 at 17:31

3 Answers 3

You miss () in cout << "CIV value: " << computeCivIndex() << endl;. For importance of braces you can check this link.

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2  
Some explanation of what is happening without () would be nice. –  jrok Oct 20 '13 at 17:31
    
civNum is not being used in function too –  P0W Oct 20 '13 at 17:32
    
Without the (), a pointer to the method is passed to cout (as a void*). –  xorguy Oct 20 '13 at 17:37
    
@xorguy: That doesn't sound right; if it's a non-static member function then that's an invalid use, and even if it is static there's no conversion from float() to void*. –  Anton Golov Oct 20 '13 at 18:20
    
@Anton Golov you're right I tried to compile that and the compiler threw an error because it wasn't a static member. –  xorguy Oct 20 '13 at 18:38

cout << "CIV value: " << computeCivIndex << endl;

seems to be printing the value of the function (not the return value). You need to put the function brackets in:

cout << "CIV value: " << computeCivIndex() << endl;

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because I have 5 arguments in computeCivIndex so do I need to put in the 5 arguments for the cout? –  user2900611 Oct 20 '13 at 17:46
    
err...no :) What I (and also Igor Popov) means is that writing the function name without the brackets does not "call" the function, it merely returns the functions address (i.e. you are printing the value of the function). If you put in brackets at the end of the function then this is the correct syntax to call the function and return the value calculated by the function to the cout. –  code_fodder Oct 20 '13 at 17:55
    
Also as others have mentioned, you civNum itself is returned by the function but its value is NEVER changed. You need to assign a new value to this variable before you return it. For example: civNum = civNum1 + civNum5; –  code_fodder Oct 20 '13 at 17:57
//convert sunType to sunTypePercentage
float LocationData::computeCivIndex(string st, int earth, int moons, float particle, float plasma)
{

    float sunTypePercent;

    if(st == "Type 0")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 80.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type B")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 45.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type A")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 60.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type F")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 75.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type G")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 90.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type K")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 80.0;
    }
    else if(st == "Type M")
    {
        sunTypePercent = 70.0;
    }

    // calculate CIV Value
    float civNum,civNum1,civNum2,civNum3,civNum4,civNum5;

    civNum1 = sunTypePercent / 100;
    civNum2 = plasma + particle;
    civNum3 = civNum2 / 200;
    civNum4 = civNum1 - civNum3;
    civNum5 = earth + moons;

    civNum = civNum4 * civNum5;


    return civNum;
}

//display data
void LocationData::displaydata()
{

    cout << "suntype: " << sunType << endl;
    cout << "earth: " << noOfEarthLikePlanets << endl;
    cout << "moons: " << noOfEarthLikeMoons << endl;
    cout << "particle: " << aveParticulateDensity << endl;
    cout <<"density: " << avePlasmaDensity << endl;
    cout << "CIV value: " << computeCivIndex()<< endl;
}

This is the actual code which i'm having problem with. For the computeCivIndex() function it is actually a static under the public LocationData class in my LocationData.h file which look something like this.

static float compute CivIndex(string st, int earth, int moons, float particle, float plasma);

so in order to retrieve the value from the function should I do this instead?

cout << "CIV value: " << LocationData.computeCivIndex() << endl;

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