Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am currently working on a project involving modifying the way linux priorities are implemented.

To do so I have :

  • a custom syscall : That modifies the task_struct of a process to change its priority

  • modified kernel/sched/fair.c

  • modified the standard task_struct to add new fields

    While the custom syscall works : it gets correctly called and prints to dmesg the fair.c file doesn't seem to take into account the changes.

original fair.c

Changes to fair.c :

 /*
  * move_task - move a task from one runqueue to another runqueue.
  * Both runqueues must be locked.
  */
 static void move_task(struct task_struct *p, struct lb_env *env)
 {
         deactivate_task(env->src_rq, p, 0);
         if (p->prio_per_cpu)
         {            
            p->rt_priority = p->smp_prio[env->dst_cpu];
            printk(KERN_EMERG "We are in move_task function");
         }
         set_task_cpu(p, env->dst_cpu);
         activate_task(env->dst_rq, p, 0);
         check_preempt_curr(env->dst_rq, p, 0);
 }

p->prio_per_cpu is set to 1 in the syscall, but move_task function doesn't seem to see it.

The syscall :

/* system call to set the new field in 
 * task struct 'smp_prio' that allows 
 * one priority per processor on SMP machines
 */

asmlinkage long sys_set_smp_prio(pid_t pid, const char *smp_prio)
{
 struct pid *pid_struct;
 struct task_struct *p;

 pid_struct = find_get_pid(pid);
 p = pid_task(pid_struct,PIDTYPE_PID);
 p->prio_per_cpu = 1;
 p->smp_prio = (char*) smp_prio;
 printk(KERN_EMERG "SMP priorities are correctly set \n");
 return 1;
}

I get the syscall printk message.

The original task_struct

The modified task_struct :

#define INIT_TASK(tsk)  \
 {                                                                       \
     .state          = 0,                                            \
     .stack          = &init_thread_info,                            \
     .usage          = ATOMIC_INIT(2),                               \
     .flags          = PF_KTHREAD,                                   \
     .prio_per_cpu   = 0,                                            \
     .smp_prio       = NULL,                                         \
     .prio           = MAX_PRIO-20,                                  \
     .static_prio    = MAX_PRIO-20,                                  \
     .normal_prio    = MAX_PRIO-20,                                  \
     .policy         = SCHED_NORMAL,                                 \
     .cpus_allowed   = CPU_MASK_ALL,                                 \
     .nr_cpus_allowed= NR_CPUS,                                      \
     .mm             = NULL,                                         \
     .active_mm      = &init_mm,                                     \
     .se             = {                                             \
             .group_node     = LIST_HEAD_INIT(tsk.se.group_node),    \
     },                                                              \
     .rt             = {                                             \
             .run_list       = LIST_HEAD_INIT(tsk.rt.run_list),      \
             .time_slice     = RR_TIMESLICE,                         \
     },         
     [...]

When I modified move_task() to print a message unconditionally it did print that message.

I am sure move_task gets called with the task_struct argument of the thread modified by the syscall because I manually force thread migration by setting cpusets (bitmask) and move_task is the very bit of code that performs migration from one cpu to another.

Why aren't the changes done by the custom syscall not effective in the move_task() function ?

Thank you for any help!

share|improve this question
    
First obvious question I think of is have you put a breakpoint at the line if (p->prio_per_cpu) to see what the value of p->prio_per_cpu is at the time of evaluation. If it is 0, it never gets to the print function. – ryyker Oct 20 '13 at 18:01
    
What does deactivate_task(env->src_rq, p, 0); do to p? – ryyker Oct 20 '13 at 18:02
    
Also, it looks like p is has local scope to sys_set_smp_prio() True? – ryyker Oct 20 '13 at 18:04
    
deactivate_task removes the task represented by p from the runqueue it is actually in – MSI Oct 20 '13 at 19:02
    
What are the changes made to task_struct ? Could you please post it ? – Vivek S Oct 21 '13 at 8:13

The locally defined struct task_struct *p; in this function:

asmlinkage long sys_set_smp_prio(pid_t pid, const char *smp_prio)
{
 struct pid *pid_struct;
 struct task_struct *p;  //THIS COPY OF task_struct *p HAS NO CONNECTION...

 pid_struct = find_get_pid(pid);
 task = pid_task(pid_struct,PIDTYPE_PID);
 p->prio_per_cpu = 1;
 p->smp_prio = (char*) smp_prio;
 printk(KERN_EMERG "SMP priorities are correctly set \n");
 return 1;
}   

Has no visible relationship to the argument passed struct task_struct *p (at least in the provided code)

static void move_task(struct task_struct *p, struct lb_env *env) //TO THIS ONE
 {
         deactivate_task(env->src_rq, p, 0);
         if (p->prio_per_cpu)  //If this value is zero, printk will never be called.
         {            
            p->rt_priority = p->smp_prio[env->dst_cpu];
            printk(KERN_EMERG "We are in move_task function");
         }
         set_task_cpu(p, env->dst_cpu);
         activate_task(env->dst_rq, p, 0);
         check_preempt_curr(env->dst_rq, p, 0);
 }  

That is, I do not see where you are calling move_task() from within sys_set_smp_prio() with its updated value for p->prio_per_cpu = 1;. Could this be the problem?

share|improve this answer
    
@rykker Sorry my fault, the code I posted was wrong I have just edited it. The code compiles properly. – MSI Oct 20 '13 at 19:00
    
So, your question is answered then? – ryyker Oct 20 '13 at 19:44
    
I mean my code compiled properly which would not have been the case with an access to p->prio_per_cpu (would have segfaulted), it is just when copying the code on stackoverflow that there have been an error. – MSI Oct 20 '13 at 20:09
    
@MehdiSouihed What ryyker is pointing to is that the argument p in move_task might belong to a different task than the one whose prio_per_cpu field you are modifying in function sys_set_smp_prio. If you think otherwise, please print the PID inside move_task and cross check whether the PID of the task you modified in sys_set_smp_prio is also printed there. – Vivek S Oct 21 '13 at 7:58
    
@VivekS Thanks for your comment. I forgot to mention that I have a test program that forces thread migration by pinning them consecutively on different cpus (cpu bitmask). I am sure that works because I can visualize it with trace-cmd and kernelshark. move_task() has to be called during a thread migration from one cpu to another. – MSI Oct 21 '13 at 8:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found the solution a long time ago, but just for the record : I am testing this new kernel facilities with real-time threads. They aren't scheduled by the CFS scheduler (fair.c)

share|improve this answer
    
If you found a solution, do tell it - otherwise this has no value to anyone else and the question should rather be deleted. – nos Jan 24 '14 at 17:57
    
Sorry if I haven't been clear, the solution is in my post : real-time programs are not scheduled using fair.c hence move_task() not being called... – MSI Jan 24 '14 at 18:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.