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I'd like to fill array of MyStruct with same value. How can it be done in fastest and simplest way? I'm operating on rather low-level methods, like memset or memcpy.

edit: std::fill_n indeed complies and works fine. But it's C++ way. How can it be done in pure C?

struct MyStruct
{
    int a;
    int b;
};

void foo()
{
    MyStruct abc;
    abc.a = 123;
    abc.b = 321;

    MyStruct arr[100];
    // fill 100 MyStruct's with copy of abc
    std::fill_n(arr, 100, abc); // working C++ way

    // or maybe loop of memcpy? But is it efficient?
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        memcpy(arr[i],abc,sizeof(MyStruct));
}
share|improve this question
2  
What error did you get with std::fill_n? –  juanchopanza Oct 20 '13 at 18:39
1  
std::fill_n(arr, 100, abc); compiles –  P0W Oct 20 '13 at 18:43
1  
C or C++? Pick one. –  user529758 Oct 20 '13 at 18:43
2  
When you post a question like this to SO you'll get to a useful answer fastest, if not solve the problem yourself, but posting a working sscce and all relevant output - in this case posting the compiler error would probably have revealed the problem was that you didn't #include <algorithm>. For your sscce, use something like ideone.com to put together an example independent of your build system. –  kfsone Oct 20 '13 at 18:56
    
@P0W : it compiles indeed. My bad. I've modified question. –  gogowitczak Oct 20 '13 at 19:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Be careful to type names of your types correctly (it's case sensitive) and don't forget the semicolon after the definition of your struct, apart from these, your program should compile with no problems:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

struct MyStruct
{
    int a;
    int b;
}; // <------------- HERE

int main() {
    MyStruct abc;
    abc.a = 123;
    abc.b = 321;

    MyStruct arr[100];
    std::fill_n(arr, 100, abc);

    std::cout << arr[99].b;
}

outputs 321.


"How can it be done in fastest and simplest way?"

The simplest way would probably be using std::vector and its appropriate constructor instead:

#include <vector>

void foo()
{
    MyStruct abc;
    abc.a = 123;
    abc.b = 321;

    std::vector<MyStruct> vec(100, abc);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Simplest but not sure if its fastest ? –  P0W Oct 20 '13 at 18:45
    
@P0W: Fair enough. Edited. –  LihO Oct 20 '13 at 18:50
1  
@POW: I bet it is: std::vector is so much slower than plain arrays?. Ps vector is not slower. Personally I would not even declare the extra variable abc. Either add a constructor so you can use like this: std::vector<MyStruct> vec(100, MyStruct(123,321)); or use C++11 initializer list std::vector<MyStruct> vec(100, {123,321}); –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '13 at 19:35
    
It's working fine, thanks! My problem is solved, but question is still open - is there a pure C way of doing that? –  gogowitczak Oct 20 '13 at 19:38
    
@gogowitczak: Unfortunately I don't know C its a completely different language. –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '13 at 19:42
for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    arr[i] = abc;
}

Fastest and cleanest. The optimizer will most likely work it's magic too.

share|improve this answer

Not pure C, but GCC allows you to do it quite nicely:

MyStruct arr[100] = { [ 0 ... 99 ] = { .a = 123, .b = 321 } };

If you need pure C, I'd follow Tri-Edge Al's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Again, it's only for initializing. I need to set whole table without reallocating memory. –  gogowitczak Oct 20 '13 at 21:51

My guess in the C99 would be below code:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct MyStruct
{
    int a ;
    int b ;
} MyStruct_t;

const MyStruct_t abc = 
{
    .a = 0,
    .b = 321, 
};

void main(void)
{
    int i = 0 ;

    MyStruct_t arr[100] = {0} ;

    for(i=0 ;i <sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]);i++)
    {
        arr[i] = abc ;
    }
}

In my opinion this is cleanest, safest solution.

share|improve this answer

The following should work in C

MyStruct arr[100] = {
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},
   {123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321},{123,321}};
share|improve this answer
    
Downvote from me. That works only when initializing array and it's stupid way. –  gogowitczak Oct 20 '13 at 20:07
    
@gogowitczak: You don;t have anything else in C. –  Loki Astari Oct 20 '13 at 22:12
    
Yes I do, look at other answers. –  gogowitczak Oct 21 '13 at 12:12
    
@gogowitczak: I was referring to you only have arrays in C. There are no other container structures. You can fill an array with 0 (using memcpy (That is the only value guaranteed to work for an array with a structure like that)). Use a loop to fill it. Or use an initializer list. Those are your ONLY options in 'C'. –  Loki Astari Oct 21 '13 at 12:38
    
voting up, it is still an option, and I was looking for this one. –  Snake Sanders Dec 16 '13 at 14:49

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