Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm building an email-monitoring framework that I'll be using for a handful of users, so I'm building a class library to wrap everything in. I'm instantiating the configuration (sender, subject, last-received, ...) in a static class. Therefore, I have something like this.

public static class MyConfig 
{
     public static int Sender { get; set; }
     // and so on and so forth

     public static void BuildMyConfig(string theSender, string theRecipient, ...) 
     {
         Sender = theSender;
         // yada yada yada...
     }
}

public class Monitoring 
{
    public delegate void DoSomethingWithEmail(EmailContents theContents);

    public void StartMonitoring() {

       //When I get an email, I call the method
       DoSomethingWithEmail(theEmailWeJustGot);
    }
}

Obviously, what we do with the email will be something completely different in each case. What I'm trying to is instantiate that delegate. Where would I do that? The MyConfig class and then invoke it from there as a static method? The instance of the Monitoring class?

An application would look like...

public class SpecificMonitor 
{
    Monitoring.BuildMyConfig("foo@bar.com", "bar@foo.com", ...);

    Monitoring m = new Monitoring();
    m.StartMonitoring();

    //But where do I build the delegate method???

}

I've gotten compiling errors with every option I've tried so far. I've also tried overriding a method instead of using a delegate, using interfaces... but I think delegation is where it's at.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consistent with the rest of your design (although I do not necessarily agree that the design is great) you could allow for the callback to be set in the configuration class

public static class MyConfig
{
    public static string Sender { get; set; }
    public static DoSomethingWithEmail EmailReceivedCallback { get; set; }

    public static void BuildMyConfig(string theSender, string theRecipient,
            DoSomethingWithEmail callback)
    {
        Sender = theSender;
        EmailReceivedCallback = callback;
    }
}

//  Make sure you bring the delegate outside of the Monitoring class!
public delegate void DoSomethingWithEmail(string theContents);

When an incoming email is acknowledged by your application you can now pass the email to the callback assigned to the configuration class

public class Monitoring
{
    public void StartMonitoring()
    {
        const string receivedEmail = "New Answer on your SO Question!";

        //Invoke the callback assigned to the config class
        MyConfig.EmailReceivedCallback(receivedEmail);
    }
}

Here is an example of usage

static void Main()
{
    MyConfig.BuildMyConfig("...", "...", HandleEmail);

    var monitoring = new Monitoring();
    monitoring.StartMonitoring();
}

static void HandleEmail(string thecontents)
{
    // Sample implementation
    Console.WriteLine("Received Email: {0}",thecontents);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey! It looks like that will compile just fine. Will put it through its paces soon. So, basically, the delegate is housed in the monitoring class but I can instantiate it through another class. Nice! Out of curiosity, though... what issue do you have with the design? Just trying to improve, that's all, so by all means, be frank. :) – napo Oct 20 '13 at 19:18
    
I am sure that an object-orientated approach (think polymorphism) would be more suitable this purpose. – User 12345678 Oct 20 '13 at 19:55
    
So, basically, you're suggesting overriding the DoSomethingWithEmail method when instantiating the Monitoring class? That's actually how I actually started, trying to do that, but I couldn't override a static method inside of the Monitoring class. – napo Oct 20 '13 at 20:00
    
Yeah basically. Maybe something like this this. – User 12345678 Oct 20 '13 at 20:08
    
Oh, I see how you're instantiating it now. Haven't played much with abstract classes, but this looks very promising. Worth poking around with — because inheritance was what I wanted to do in the first place. Thanks for the snippet! – napo Oct 20 '13 at 20:21

Define the constructor so that when people instantiate a Monitoring object, they must define the delegate:

public class Monitoring 
{
    public delegate void DoSomethingWithEmail(EmailContents theContents);

    public Monitoring(Delegate DoSomethingWithEmail)
    {
        this.DoSomethingWithEmail = DoSomethingWithEmail;
    }

    public void StartMonitoring() {

       //When I get an email, I call the method
       DoSomethingWithEmail(theEmailWeJustGot);
    }
}

Then pass in the delegate you want when you instantiate each Monitoring:

Monitoring m = new Monitoring(delegate(EmailContents theContents) 
{ 
    /* Do stuff with theContents here */
});
m.StartMonitoring();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Between your answer and the one above, it looks like I'll have options. Let me compare the different options and see what shakes out. Thanks again! – napo Oct 20 '13 at 19:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.