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I created a program for removing extra spaces from string.

void removeDuplicateSpaces(char **c){  //a-b---c
    char *a=*c;
    char *b=malloc(sizeof(char)*strlen(*c));  <-- allocation
    int i=0,nf=0,space=0;
    for(;a[i]!='\0';i++){
        if(a[i] != ' '){             //a-b-
            if(space>1){
                b[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
                space=0;
            }else{
                b[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
            }
        }else{
            space++;
            if(space==1 && i!=0){
                b[nf]=' ';
                nf++;
            }
        }
    }
    b[i]='\0';
    *c=b;
    }

int main(void) {
    char *a="    Arista    is     hiring    from   ISM   Dhanbad";
    removeDuplicateSpaces(&a); //function prototype can't be changed.
    printf("%s",a);     // ? where to deallocate.
    return 0;
}

Working demo

It is working fine. But the issue is where should i deallocate memory, allocated in removeDuplicateSpaces() function. If i add free statement after the printf in main then it make my program to crash(signal 6 abort). So what is the correct way ?


Original Problem

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
    char *foo = "    Arista    is     hiring    from   ISM   Dhanbad";
    void removeDuplicateSpaces(foo);
    printf("%s\n", foo);
}

Above code was given. Write a function removeDuplicateSpaces so as to remove the extra spaces in the given string.

For Example : ( ‘-’ denotes spaces for clarity)

Input String : (without quotes)
“—-Arista——is—-hiring—-from-ISM–Dhanbad”
Output String :
“Arista-is-hiring-from-ISM-Dhanbad”
share|improve this question
    
The return value you do need to deallocate. The original pointer you do not. free(a); after you printf(), but before the return statement. And you should probably know that this function has undefined behavior. You only allocate space equivalent to the size of a pointer, not the original string. char *b=malloc(sizeof(a)); allocates the size of a pointer, not the length of the input string. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 20:11
    
I mean you need to fix the original function so it doesn't have undefined behavior first. And I already told you where to delicate the (incorrectly sized) malloced data: after the closing printf() but before the return, free(a);. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 20:16
    
Changing it from sizeof(a) to sizeof(*a) isn't the solution. That will allocate space for one character rather than the space for the length of the string + 1 for the terminating zero. Do you know what a zero-terminated string in C is? How do you find its length ? –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 20:20
    
Still missing space for the terminating zero, and I hope you realize this function is prototyped rather poorly. It takes a pointer to a const-char-pointer. This means passing the address of a non-const char pointer is technically invalid, as it the inner const qualifier is removed. Further, you can't "fix" that by making main()s variable a const, because then you can't free() it without a hard cast. In short, the input parameter for this is typed wrong. I don't know what the original problem was that this function solves, but it smells like an XY problem to me. Good luck. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 20:32
    
@WhozCraig Posted the actual problem. It was asked during the interview. –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

here is an alternative way to do it

char* removeDuplicateSpaces( char const * src )  // show that input string is read-only
{
  char* strnospaces = calloc( 1, strlen(src)+1 );// string is filled with \0's
  for (char *t = strnospaces, *s = src; *s; )    // copy until \0
    if (!isspace(*s)) *t++=*s++; else s++;       // copy only if not space
  return strnospaces;  
}
share|improve this answer
    
It was suggested by me during interview. But i'm not allowed to change the void return type. :( –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:45
    
ah ok! then i would suggest you use char [] as input instead of a pointer, that way it is more clear that you are modifying the string i.e. void removeDuplicateSpaces( char src[] ) –  Claptrap Oct 20 '13 at 20:49
    
if the input is in array format, will it modify the original string ? +1 i like the solution. –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:53
    
if you pass an array to the function you can modify it, you should not pass a pointer to a string literal if you are modifying the contents. a string literal is read-only. e.g. char* p = "mytext"; otoh char p[] = "mytext"; is not read-only –  Claptrap Oct 20 '13 at 20:59

It's better not to return some allocated string from your removeDuplicateSpaces function. Instead modify it to operate on already allocated buffer, then you will know exactly when memory you allocated can be freed.

Something like this:

char *a="    Arista    is     hiring    from   ISM   Dhanbad";
char *b = (char *)malloc(sizeof(a)); // for sure result string will be less or equal to origin
removeDuplicateSpaces(&a, b);
printf("%s",b);
free(b);

and in removeDuplicateSpaces you don't need to allocate anything then.

EDIT: Try this

void removeDuplicateSpaces(const char **c){  //a-b---c
    char *a=*c;
    int i=0,nf=0,space=0;
    for(;a[i]!='\0';i++){
        if(a[i] != ' '){             //a-b-
            if(space>1){
                a[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
                space=0;
            }else{
                a[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
            }
        }else{
            space++;
            if(space==1 && i!=0){
                a[nf]=' ';
                nf++;
            }
        }
    }
    a[nf]='\0';
}

int main()
{
    char *a="    Arista    is     hiring    from   ISM   Dhanbad";
    char *b = (char *)malloc(strlen(a)+1);
    strcpy(b, a);
    removeDuplicateSpaces(&b); //function prototype can't be changed.
    printf("%s",b);
    free(b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Function prototype cannot be changed. –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:19
    
Then you have to modify your algorithm not to allocate new string but change existing one. It's just an array of chars and you can "compress" it by shifting values left and put '\0' at the new end. –  Denis Oct 20 '13 at 20:30
    
Please provide the code. I can't think of it. I mean i don't know how to modify(if possible) literal strings. –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:32
    
why do you have char *b = (char *)malloc(sizeof(a));? Were you thinking about strlen(a) maybe ? –  cacho Oct 20 '13 at 20:42
1  
@cacho just copy-pasted it and didn't notice :) ty. WhozCraig pointed it out in comments to original post already. –  Denis Oct 20 '13 at 20:50

You would suggest the following solution. Make return type of your function to be char* which will return the allocated memory pointed by b. Then change invocation of the function like shown in the following updated code. You can free the memory in main() after printf then.

#include<stdio.h>

char *removeDuplicateSpaces(const char **c){  //a-b---c
    char *a=*c;
    char *b=malloc(sizeof(a));  <-- allocation
    int i=0,nf=0,space=0;
    for(;a[i]!='\0';i++){
        if(a[i] != ' '){             //a-b-
            if(space>1){
                b[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
                space=0;
            }else{
                b[nf]=a[i];
                nf++;
            }
        }else{
            space++;
            if(space==1 && i!=0){
                b[nf]=' ';
                nf++;
            }
        }
    }
    b[i]='\0';
    *c=b;
    return b;
    }

int main(void) {
    char *a="    Arista    is     hiring    from   ISM   Dhanbad";
    char *c;
    c=removeDuplicateSpaces(&a);
    printf("%s",a);     // ? where to deallocate.a
    free(c);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Function prototype can't be changed. –  Arpit Oct 20 '13 at 20:16
    
@Arpit Per your posted update, the prototype must be changed (though not necessarily to conform to this answer) as the original problem requires a char*, and your function requires a const char **. they're completely different types and not compatible. –  WhozCraig Oct 20 '13 at 21:45

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