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Why following perl script prints all lines (1 to 14) for $a=3 and $b=5. If I change " if (my $num = $a .. $b )" to "if (my $num = 3 .. 5 )" it gives me (as expected)

1 3

2 4

3E0 5

#!/usr/bin/perl
$a=3;
$b=5;
while (<DATA>) {
    if  (my $num = $a .. $b ) {
        print $num,"\t", $_;
    }
}
__DATA__
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 
9
10
11
12
13
14 
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1 Answer 1

When the flipflop operator is given constant operands, it implicitly means to compare them to $. (the current line number), so 3..5 is actually (($.==3) .. ($.==5)). If you use variables, you need to explicitly make the comparison.

So:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $first_line = 3;
my $last_line = 5;
while (<DATA>) {
    if  (my $num = ($first_line==$.) .. ($last_line==$.) ) {
        print $num,"\t", $_;
    }
}

It isn't a bug. It's intentional that it allows you to abbreviate it as just 3..5. It can't take other things and assume they are line numbers, because you can use arbitrary boolean expressions (e.g. 3../last/ to match from line 3 up to a line containing "last").

http://perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Range-Operators:

In scalar context, ".." returns a boolean value. The operator is bistable, like a flip-flop, and emulates the line-range (comma) operator of sed, awk, and various editors. Each ".." operator maintains its own boolean state, even across calls to a subroutine that contains it. It is false as long as its left operand is false. Once the left operand is true, the range operator stays true until the right operand is true, AFTER which the range operator becomes false again. ... If either operand of scalar ".." is a constant expression, that operand is considered true if it is equal (== ) to the current input line number (the $. variable).

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