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I'm sure the title looks like something that's been asked before but I've searched for the answer to this and I can't find it.

I'm really very new to coding, so please excuse any really obvious mistakes I've made.

Context to the code I'm working on: I'm in a Game Design class and I've decided to take up a personal project making an HTML JS game.

I understand that the code is possibly rough / bad / definitely-not-the-best-way-to-do-things, but it will continue to be so until I improve my skills (or am given advice on how to improve it).

What I need help with: For two to three weeks, I could not figure out how to get a button to appear when implemented inside of an if else statement.

Like so:

if(condition)
{
    document.write("text");
    //desired button here
}
else  
{  
    //Backup code  
}

Eventually I figured two ways to do that (for Chrome and Internet Explorer).

First way:

function myFunction()
    {
    document.close();
    document.write("text");
    /* There will be buttons in here 
    too when I get things working. */
    }

//In separate script tags 
/* myFunction() dwells in the head of the 
page while the if statement is in the body 
and another function*/

if(condition)
    {
    document.write("text");
    var gameElement=document.createElement("BUTTON");
    var text=document.createTextNode("CLICK ME");
    gameElement.appendChild(text);
    gameElement.onclick = myFunction;
    document.body.appendChild(gameElement);
    }
else
    {
    //Backup code
    }

The second way:

(The same function, they're both in the same places).

if(condition)
    {
    document.write("text");
    var gameElement;
    gameElement = document.createElement('input');
    gameElement.id = 'gameButton';
    gameElement.type = 'button';
    gameElement.value='Continue';
    gameElement.onclick = myFunction;
    document.body.appendChild(gameElement);
    }

This works well for me.

And while it works in IE and Chrome fine, it doesn't work in Firefox.

After how much time and research I've put into just this button, I'd love to know why it won't show up in Firefox. I've read a lot about Firefox and how .onclick won't work or something like JavaScript has to be enabled or disabled. I'm just a bit confused.

I'm also open any real / relevant advice.

share|improve this question
1  
If condition is true, you see the word "text" and a button. you click the button, it dissappears. this works for me in all 3 browsers. What specifically is not working? –  chiliNUT Oct 20 '13 at 21:27
1  
document.write, when called after the initial rendering of the document is finished, will replace the whole document with the new content – so this method is the first thing you want to throw overboard and ban from your arsenal, believe me. –  CBroe Oct 20 '13 at 21:30
    
@chiliNUT- What I was explaining to Mike below, was that I made a mistake in asking the question. I left out a detail. The condition goes to a prompt box, and goes if(name!=null). And I don't receive any problems with that part of the code. It works up until I get to the button in the if else statement. But, if you look at the code, it's like this: if the condition is true; you see the text and button- this works. But the button doesn't call the function in Firefox. That's what doesn't work. –  DanieWrathh Oct 21 '13 at 0:21
    
@CBroe- I've heard all kinds of bad stuff about document.write. I've looked for alternatives to accomplish the same thing, but I've yet to find something. Because my goal is to have a new page or have the same affect as replacing the document with new content. I want the old page gone. But I've heard about how document.write really isn't a good way of doing anything. So, again, I've looked for different methods but my efforts have been fruitless. –  DanieWrathh Oct 21 '13 at 0:26
    
@CBroe- It was the document.write causing my problems. And I've found a way to do basically what I've been using document.write to do without using document.write. I'm hoping it's a better way of doing so, even though it accomplished the same thing ^^; –  DanieWrathh Oct 22 '13 at 4:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I set up this fiddle. I removed your document.write() calls because they're disallowed in JSFiddle, and change your condition to true so the code would work, and it works in FF24.

document.write() might be the cause of your problem. It's bad practice anyway because it can cause a re-parse of a document, or wipe the entire document and start writing it again. You're already using some DOM manipulation to add the button. I suggest you do likewise for anything you're considering using document.write() for.

share|improve this answer
    
In the code, which I considered leaving this but I didn't think it would be necessary because I've seen people just use things like 'if(condition)' on here a lot, the condition is for a prompt box, and the if statement condition is if(name!=null)..so on. And document.write I've heard all about, and I've looked for alternatives for, but my goal actually is to have the page change altogether. I don't know, being as new as I am, of another code that would do that. –  DanieWrathh Oct 21 '13 at 0:13
    
So for a while I had been cleaning up the code, which is why this is a little late. But part of this included getting rid of the document.write. And it hadn't occurred to me to even attempt trying running the code in Firefox after I had cleared the code of document.write. Sure enough, that's what was wrong. When ran in Firefox and the condition is true, the button fires just like with the other four major browsers. Thank you for your help. ^-^ –  DanieWrathh Oct 22 '13 at 4:15

Instead of suggesting a solution to your problem, I would suggest you take a look at jQuery, which is a very nice JavaScript framework, that makes it possible for you to write cross-browser compatible code, which it seems is your problem here.

Using jQuery, you would be able to write something like:

$("#gameButton").click(function() { myFunction(); }

which would trigger your myFunction() function, when the control with the id 'gameButton' is clicked.

Visit www.jquery.com to learn more

share|improve this answer
    
While it is a solution, OP hasn't asked for jQuery. You may find this gets downvoted. –  Popnoodles Oct 20 '13 at 21:33
    
OP probably doesn't realize jQuery exists. I think it's a good idea to make OP aware of the framework. –  CodeMonkey Oct 20 '13 at 21:58
    
I have heard of and seen jQuery. I've been using this site via Google long enough to have seen it. I don't have much idea how it works though. It seems like a really good alternative, but it would take some serious explanation before I could use it in code and know what I'm doing. –  DanieWrathh Oct 21 '13 at 0:30

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